Search results for 'Philosophy of Human Rights' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Adam Etinson (2010). To Be or Not to Be: Charles Beitz on the Philosophy of Human Rights. Res Publica 16 (4):441-448.score: 1632.0
    This is a review article of Charles Beitz's 2009 book on the philosophy of human rights, The Idea of Human Rights. The article provides a charitable overview of the book's main arguments, but also raises some doubts about the depth of the distinction between Beitz's 'practical' approach to humans rights and its 'naturalistic' counterparts.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 1347.0
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thaddeus Metz (2010). Human Dignity, Capital Punishment, and an African Moral Theory: Toward a New Philosophy of Human Rights. Journal of Human Rights 9 (1):81-99.score: 1254.0
    In this article I spell out a conception of dignity grounded in African moral thinking that provides a plausible philosophical foundation for human rights, focusing on the particular human right not to be executed by the state. I first demonstrate that the South African Constitutional Court’s sub-Saharan explanations of why the death penalty is degrading all counterintuitively entail that using deadly force against aggressors is degrading as well. Then, I draw on one major strand of Afro-communitarian thought (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alan S. Rosenbaum (ed.) (1980). The Philosophy of Human Rights: International Perspectives. Greenwood Press.score: 1248.0
  5. Patrick Hayden (2001). The Philosophy of Human Rights. Paragon House.score: 1248.0
  6. Christoph Lüth, Dieter Jedan, Thomas Altfelix & Rita E. Guare (eds.) (2002). The Enlightenment Idea of Human Rights in Philosophy and Education and Postmodern Criticism. Winkler.score: 1233.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Amar Dhall (2010). On the Philosophy and Legal Theory of Human Rights in Light of Quantum Holism. World Futures 66 (1):1 – 25.score: 1203.0
    This article explores the traditional basis of modern human rights doctrines and exposes some of the systemic shortcomings. It then posits that a number of these problems are advanced via integrating some developments in the philosophy of science and substantive scientific research into legal philosophy. This article argues that supervening holism grounded in quantum mechanics provides an alternative basis to human rights by positing an ontological construct that is congruous with many of the wisdom (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 1164.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Clark Butler, Review of the Book,The Philosophy of Human Rights, Edited by Alan Rosenbaum. [REVIEW]score: 1137.0
    Chaim Perelman's article in this volume first set me on the path of human rights ethics. A professor of Rhetoric, he understood the construction of human rights to be the construction of a universal audience, or potential universal audience, for the exercise of freedom of expression.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Costas Douzinas (2007). Human Rights and Empire: The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 1110.0
    Erudite and timely, this book is a key contribution to the renewal of radical theory and politics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Eric D. Smaw (2008). An Analysis of the Philosophy of Universal Human Rights: Hobbes, Locke, and Ignatieff. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):39-58.score: 1107.0
    This project is, in part, motivated by my contention that one cannot adequately answer the question regarding the proper justification for human rights until one has answered the metaphysical question regarding the fundamental nature of human rights and the ontological question regarding the proper status of human rights. I offer a sustained analysis of metaphysical, ontological, and justificatory questions regarding human rights with the purpose of illustrating the point that theories that fail (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David Heise (2008). The Philosophy of Human Rights. Essays in Philosophy 9 (2):8.score: 1032.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. A. J. M. Milne (1986). Human Rights and Human Diversity: An Essay in the Philosophy of Human Rights. State University of New York Press.score: 1020.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Raymond Aron (1970). Sociology and the Philosophy of Human Rights. In Howard Evans Kiefer & Milton Karl Munitz (eds.), Ethics and Social Justice. Albany,State University of New York Press. 282--299.score: 1020.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Anat Biletzki (2015). The Philosophy of Human Rights: A Systematic Introduction. Routledge.score: 1020.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Michael Lessnoff (1988). Human Rights and Human Diversity: An Essay in the Philosophy of Human Rights. Philosophical Books 29 (3):173-175.score: 1020.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Concepts, Communication, and the Relevance of Philosophy to Human Rights: A Response to Randall Peerenboom. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):320-324.score: 1017.0
  18. G. K. D. Crozier & Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Jennifer Caseldine-Bracht is a Ph. D. Student in the Department of Philosophy at Michigan State University. She is a Research Associate for the Institute of Human Rights at Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1).score: 1017.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Jorge Guerra Gonz�Lez (2003). Taupitz, J. (Ed.): Die Bedeutung der Philosophie F�R Die Rechtswissenschaft?Dargestellt Am Beispiel der Menschenrechtskonvention Zur Biomedizin. (The Meaning of Philosophy for the Legal Sciences?According to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Biomedicine). [REVIEW] Poiesis and Praxis 1 (4):308-316.score: 1005.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Fausto Brito (2013). Breach of Human Rights in the Political Philosophy of Hannah Arendt. Kriterion 54 (127):177-196.score: 1005.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Wouter Werner (2008). Costas Douzinas, Human Rights and Empire. The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (2):197-199.score: 1002.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. W. Kersting (2002). Global Human Rights, Peace and Cultural Difference: Huntington and the Political Philosophy of International Relations. Kantian Review 6 (1):5-34.score: 990.0
  23. Laurence Rosan (1971). Human Dignity and Human Rights in the Philosophy of Absolute Idealism. World Futures 9 (1):99-105.score: 990.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Alan Mittleman (2009). No Fear of Foundations: Reflections on Human Rights in Contemporary Jewish Philosophy. Heythrop Journal 50 (6):923-929.score: 990.0
  25. Borin Dubin (2003). Ph. D. In Philosophy, Lecturer in the Philosophical Faculty of the Novosibirsk State University, Director of the Non-Governmental Library for Human Rights and the Situation of Women (Resursnyj Centr Gumanitarnogo Obrazovanija), Author of Articles About Problems of Gender Relations. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 55:81-83.score: 990.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alexandre Lefebvre (2013). Human Rights as a Way of Life: On Bergson's Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.score: 990.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Joseph Hoover & Marta Iñiguez De Heredia (2011). Philosophers, Activists, and Radicals: A Story of Human Rights and Other Scandals. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (2):191-220.score: 948.0
    Paradoxically, the political success of human rights is often taken to be its philosophical failing. From US interventions to International NGOs to indigenous movements, human rights have found a place in diverse political spaces, while being applied to disparate goals and expressed in a range of practices. This heteronomy is vital to the global appeal of human rights, but for traditional moral and political philosophy it is something of a scandal. This paper is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Robin Redhead & Nick Turnbull (2011). Towards a Study of Human Rights Practitioners. Human Rights Review 12 (2):173-189.score: 948.0
    The expansion of human rights provisions has produced an increasing number of human rights practitioners and delineated human rights as a field of its own. Questions of who is practicing human rights and how they practice it have become important. This paper considers the question of human rights practice and the agency of practitioners, arguing that practice should not be conceived as the application of philosophy, but instead approached from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Mark F. N. Franke (2013). A Critique of the Universalisability of Critical Human Rights Theory: The Displacement of Immanuel Kant. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (4):367-385.score: 933.0
    While the critically oriented writings of Immanuel Kant remain the key theoretical grounds from which universalists challenge reduction of international rights law and protection to the practical particularities of sovereign states, Kant’s theory can be read as also a crucial argument for a human rights regime ordered around sovereign states and citizens. Consequently, universalists may be tempted to push Kant’s thinking to greater critical examination of ‘the human’ and its properties. However, such a move to more (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Mahoney (2007). The Challenge of Human Rights: Origin, Development, and Significance. Blackwell Pub..score: 930.0
    The Challenge of Human Rights traces the history of human rights theory from classical antiquity through the enlightenment to the modern human rights movement, and analyses the significance of human rights in today’s increasingly globalized world. Provides an engaging study of the origin and the philosophical and political development of human rights discourse. Offers an original defence of human rights. Explores the significance of human rights in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Clinton Timothy Curle (2007). Humanité: John Humphrey's Alternative Account of Human Rights. University of Toronto Press.score: 930.0
    Curle concludes that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, understood in a Bergsonian context, provides us with a way to affirm in the modern context that ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Filip Spagnoli (2003). Homo Democraticus: On the Universal Desirability and the Not so Universal Possibility of Democracy and Human Rights. Cambridge Scholars.score: 915.0
    The subject of the book - the universal value of human rights and democracy - is highly topical in view of the "democratic imperialism" of the current US ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Marcus Arvan (2014). A Better, Dual Theory of Human Rights. Philosophical Forum 45 (1):17-47.score: 894.0
    Human rights theory and practice have long been stuck in a rut. Although disagreement is the norm in philosophy and social-political practice, the sheer depth and breadth of disagreement about human rights is truly unusual. Human rights theorists and practitioners disagree – wildly in many cases – over just about every issue: what human rights are, what they are for, how many of them there are, how they are justified, what (...) interests or capacities they are supposed to protect, what they require of persons and institutions, etc. Disagreement about human rights is so profound, in fact, that several prominent theorists have remarked that the very concept of a “human right” appears nearly criterionless. In my 2012 article, “Reconceptualizing Human Rights”, I diagnosed the root cause of these problems. Theorists and practitioners have falsely supposed that the concept of “human right” picks out a single, unified class of moral entitlements. However, the concept actually refers to two fundamentally different types of moral entitlements: (A) international human rights, which are universal human moral entitlements to coercive international protections, and (B) domestic human rights, which are universal human moral entitlements to coercive domestic protections. Accordingly, I argue, an adequate “theory of human rights” must be a dual theory. The present paper provides the first such theory. First, I show that almost every justificatory ground given for “human rights” in the literature – such as the notion of a “minimally decent human life”, “urgent human interests”, and “human needs” – faces at least one of two fatal problems. Second, I show that after some revisions, James Griffin’s conception of “personhood” provides a compelling justificatory ground for international human rights. Third, I show that the account entails that there are very few international human rights – far fewer than existing human rights theories and practices suggest. Fourth, I show that there are reasons to find my very short list of international human rights compelling: “human rights justifications” for coercive international and foreign policy actions over the past several have consistently overstepped what can be morally justified, and my account reveals precisely how existing human rights theories and practices have failed to adequately grapple with these moral hazards. Finally, I outline an account of domestic human rights which fits well with many existing human rights beliefs and practices, vindicating those beliefs and practices, but only at a domestic level. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Shannon Brincat (2008). `Death to Tyrants': The Political Philosophy of Tyrannicide - Part I. Journal of International Political Theory 4 (2):212-240.score: 876.0
    This paper examines the conceptual development of the philosophical justifications for tyrannicide. It posits that the political philosophy of tyrannicide can be categorised into three distinct periods or models, the classical, medieval, and liberal, respectively. It argues that each model contained unique themes and principles that justified tyrannicide in that period; the classical, through the importance attached to public life and the functional role of leadership; the medieval, through natural law doctrine; and the liberal, through the postulates of social (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jennifer Szende (2011). Review of Charles Beitz The Idea of Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (4):639-641.score: 861.0
  36. S. Matthew Liao & Adam Etinson (2012). Political and Naturalistic Conceptions of Human Rights: A False Polemic? Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (3):327-352.score: 858.0
    What are human rights? According to one longstanding account, the Naturalistic Conception of human rights, human rights are those that we have simply in virtue of being human. In recent years, however, a new and purportedly alternative conception of human rights has become increasingly popular. This is the so-called Political Conception of human rights, the proponents of which include John Rawls, Charles Beitz, and Joseph Raz. In this paper we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Charles Blattberg (2009). The Ironic Tragedy of Human Rights. In Patriotic Elaborations: Essays in Practical Philosophy. McGill-Queen's University Press.score: 822.0
    With the 1948 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the idea of human rights came into its own on the world stage. More than anything, the Declaration was a response to the Holocaust, to both its perpetrators and the failure of the rest of the world adequately to come to the aid of its victims. Since that year, however, we have seen many more cases of mass murder. Think of China, Bali, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Guatemala, the former (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Stefano Semplici (forthcoming). Balancing the Principles: Why the Universality of Human Rights is Not the Trojan Horse of Moral Imperialism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-9.score: 819.0
    The new dilemmas and responsibilities which arise in bioethics both because of the unprecedented pace of scientific development and of growing moral pluralism are more and more difficult to grapple with. At the ‘global’ level, the call for the universal nature at least of some fundamental moral values and principles is often being contended as a testament of arrogance, if not directly as a new kind of subtler imperialism. The human rights framework itself, which provided the basis for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas Cushman (ed.) (2011). Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge.score: 813.0
  40. Vladimir Dedijer & Rudi Rizman (eds.) (1982). The Universal Validity of Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Analysis: The Case of Russell Tribunals. R. Rizman.score: 813.0
  41. Benulal Dhar (2013). The Philosophical Understanding of Human Rights. D.K. Printworld.score: 813.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Costas Douzinas (2000). The End of Human Rights: Critical Legal Thought at the Turn of the Century. Hart Pub..score: 813.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jonathan Power (2003). Do We Need to Make War on Behalf of Human Rights? Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Studies.score: 813.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Michalinos Zembylas (2012). Citizenship Education and Human Rights in Sites of Ethnic Conflict: Toward Critical Pedagogies of Compassion and Shared Fate. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (6):553-567.score: 807.0
    The present essay discusses the value of citizenship as shared fate in sites of ethnic conflict and analyzes its implications for citizenship education in light of three issues: first, the requirements of affective relationality in the notion of citizenship-as-shared fate; second, the tensions between the values of human rights and shared fate in sites of ethnic conflict; and third, the ways in which citizenship education might overcome these tensions without falling into the trap of psychologization and instrumentalization, but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Diana Tietjens Meyers (2009). Narrative Structures, Narratives of Abuse, and Human Rights. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non- Ideal. Kluwer.score: 804.0
    This paper explores the relation between victims’ stories and normativity. As a contribution to understanding how the stories of those who have been abused or oppressed can advance moral understanding, catalyze moral innovation, and guide social change, this paper focuses on narrative as a variegated form of representation and asks whether personal narratives of victimization play any distinctive role in human rights discourse. In view of the fact that a number of prominent students of narrative build normativity into (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Emmanuel Kabengele Mpinga, Leslie London & Philippe Chastonay (2011). Health and Human Rights: Epistemological Status and Perspectives of Development. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):237-247.score: 804.0
    The health and human rights movement (HHR) shows obvious signs of maturation both internally and externally. Yet there are still many questions to be addressed. These issues include the movement’s epistemological status and its perspectives of development. This paper discusses critically the conditions of emergence of HHR, its identity, its dominant schools of thought, its epistemological postures and its methodological issues. Our analysis shows that: (a) the epistemological status of HHR is ambiguous; (b) its identity is uncertain in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Cheryl Hughes (1999). Reconstructing the Subject of Human Rights. Philosophy and Social Criticism 25 (2):47-60.score: 798.0
    Recent philosophical criticisms of individual rights and the postmodern deconstruction of the sovereign subject raise serious questions for the defense of universal human rights. This paper critically examines Paul Ricoeur's effort to reconstruct a viable notion of the human subject as the bearer of human rights. Ricoeur's analysis of the narrative structure of human experiences and action takes account of the recent philosophical criticisms of sovereign subjectivity; it avoids both the fiction of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ch Perelman (1982). The Safeguarding and Foundation of Human Rights. Law and Philosophy 1 (1):119 - 129.score: 798.0
    Human rights, as legally understood, must be safeguarded. This presupposes a state of law. The safeguarding of human rights further presupposes an independent judiciary applying the law in a community with common values and aspirations. The foundation of human rights is an individualistic philosophy dependent on the respect for truth and the possibility for the individual to attain it. The respect for the dignity of the human person is the result of a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Patrick Loobuyck (2010). Intrinsic and Equal Human Worth in a Secular Worldview. Fictionalism in Human Rights Discourse. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):58-77.score: 798.0
    One of the most central ideas of secular, humanistic morality is the thesis of intrinsic and equal human worth. Paradoxically, it is very hard to place this thesis in a secular worldview, because an indifferent universe can not make room for intrinsic values and a priori human rights. Nevertheless, it would not be a good solution to jettison the whole human rights discourse. Therefore, this paper proposes the stance of moral fictionalism: to believe that the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Hailiang Yan (2008). Ren Quan Lun Zheng Fan Shi de Bian Ge: Cong Zhu Ti Xing Dao Guan Xi Xing = Theories of Justifications for Human Rights. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.score: 798.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999