Search results for 'Philosophy of Language' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  29
    Social Philosophy (1973). Meaning and Structure: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. Philosophical Books 14 (3):8-10.
    A review of a work in which a systematic and general theory of the nature of the conventions governing the semantics of a natural language is developed, with the object of offering a conceptual framework within which semantic phenomena can be understood in relation to syntax and to the communicative and social aspects of language. The empiricist theory of language is criticized for not supplying an adequate framework for the explanation of language learning. Taxonomy is a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mark Schroeder (2012). Philosophy of Language for Metaethics. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge
    Metaethics is the study of metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language, insofar as they relate to the subject matter of moral or, more broadly, normative discourse – the subject matter of what is good, bad, right or wrong, just, reasonable, rational, what we must or ought to do, or otherwise. But out of these four ‘core’ areas of philosophy, it is plausibly the philosophy of language that is (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  6
    Savas L. Tsohatzidis (2007). Introduction to 'John Searle's Philosophy of Language'. In John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press
    -/- This volume presents eleven original essays that critically examine aspects of John Searle's seminal contributions to the philosophy of language, and explore new ways in which some of their themes could be developed. After an opening essay by Searle in which he summarizes the essentials of his conception of language and what he currently takes its most distinctive implications to be, the critical essays are grouped into two interconnected parts – “From mind to meaning” and “From (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  88
    Michael Dummett (1973). Frege: Philosophy of Language. Duckworth.
    This highly acclaimed book is a major contribution to the philosophy of language as well as a systematic interpretation of Frege, indisputably the father of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   370 citations  
  5.  28
    Géza Kállay (2011). At T-Time, the Inchoative Nick of Time, and “Statements About the Past”: Time and History in the Analytic Philosophy of Language. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):322-351.
    The paper, drawing on articles by J. M. E. McTaggart, G. E. Moore, D. Davidson, J. L. Austin, B. Russell, A. J. Ayer and G. E. M. Anscombe, argues that the philosophy of language in the analytic tradition has developed an “inchoative“ view of time, and history is a problem as regards the existence of events in the past and how these events can be known. An alternative view is hinted at through the work of L. Wittgenstein and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  67
    Nathaniel Hansen, Experimental Philosophy of Language. Oxford Handbooks Online.
    Experimental philosophy of language uses experimental methods developed in the cognitive sciences to investigate topics of interest to philosophers of language. This article describes the methodological background for the development of experimental approaches to topics in philosophy of language, distinguishes negative and positive projects in experimental philosophy of language, and evaluates experimental work on the reference of proper names and natural kind terms. The reliability of expert judgments vs. the judgments of ordinary speakers, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  75
    Albert Atkin (2008). Peirce's Final Account of Signs and the Philosophy of Language. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (1):pp. 63-85.
    In this paper I examine parallels between C.S. Peirce's most mature account of signs and contemporary philosophy of language. I do this by first introducing a summary of Peirce's final account of Signs. I then use that account of signs to reconstruct Peircian answers to two puzzles of reference: The Problem of Cognitive Significance, or Frege's Puzzle; and The Same-Saying Phenomenon for Indexicals. Finally, a comparison of these Peircian answers with both Fregean and Direct Referentialist approaches to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  15
    Michael Devitt (1999). Language and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. MIT Press.
    Completely revised and updated in its Second Edition, _Language and Reality_ provides students, philosophers and cognitive scientists with a lucid and provocative introduction to the philosophy of language.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   80 citations  
  9.  50
    Andrew Jorgensen (2010). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (2):303-306.
    This Article is a review of Barry Smith and Ernest Lepore's "Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language".
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  90
    Nam-In Lee (2010). Phenomenology of Language Beyond the Deconstructive Philosophy of Language. Continental Philosophy Review 42 (4):465-481.
    In Speech and Phenomena and other works, Derrida criticizes Husserl’s phenomenology and attempts to pave the way to his deconstructive philosophy. The starting point of his criticism of Husserl’s phenomenology is his assessment of the latter’s phenomenology of language developed in the Logical Investigations. Derrida claims that Husserl’s phenomenology of language in the Logical Investigations and the subsequent works is guided by the premise of the metaphysics of presence. The aim of this paper is twofold: on the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  72
    Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.) (2007). John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a volume of original essays on key aspects of John Searle's philosophy of language. It examines Searle's work in relation to current issues of central significance, including internalism versus externalism about mental and linguistic content, truth-conditional versus non-truth-conditional conceptions of content, the relative priorities of thought and language in the explanation of intentionality, the status of the distinction between force and sense in the theory of meaning, the issue of meaning scepticism in relation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Markus Schrenk & Albert Newen (2008). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language (German). WBG.
    The Philosophy ofLanguage belongs to the foundations of philosophical reflexion. In this volume, its central problems and strategies are explained, and the nature of sentences and other elements of language are analysed. The didactical exposition of the most important schools and thinkers makes the volume particularly interesting for readers new to the subject.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  49
    John Michael Krois (2011). The Priority of "Symbolism" Over Language in Cassirer's Philosophy. Synthese 179 (1):9 - 20.
    This essay reconstructs the steps by which Cassirer moved from the philosophy of language in the early 1920s to his more general theory of symbolism. The linguistic turn in philosophy overcame idealism without falling into naturalism or psychologism, but according to Cassirer proclaiming the primacy of language was one-sided. He claimed that language is but one symbolic form among many and, what is more, it is not the most fundamental kind of symbolism. The basic function (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Richard Heck & Robert May (2006). Frege's Contribution to Philosophy of Language. In Barry C. Smith (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press 3--39.
    An investigation of Frege’s various contributions to the study of language, focusing on three of his most famous doctrines: that concepts are unsaturated, that sentences refer to truth-values, and that sense must be distinguished from reference.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  60
    Sebastian Lutz (2012). Artificial Language Philosophy of Science. European Journal for Philosophy of Science (Browse Results) 2 (2):181–203.
    Abstract Artificial language philosophy (also called ‘ideal language philosophy’) is the position that philosophical problems are best solved or dissolved through a reform of language. Its underlying methodology—the development of languages for specific purposes—leads to a conventionalist view of language in general and of concepts in particular. I argue that many philosophical practices can be reinterpreted as applications of artificial language philosophy. In addition, many factually occurring interrelations between the sciences and (...) of science are justified and clarified by the assumption of an artificial language methodology. Content Type Journal Article Category Original paper in Philosophy of Science Pages 1-23 DOI 10.1007/s13194-011-0042-6 Authors Sebastian Lutz, Theoretical Philosophy Unit, Utrecht University, Postbus 80126, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands Journal European Journal for Philosophy of Science Online ISSN 1879-4920 Print ISSN 1879-4912. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  4
    Robert J. Clack (1969). Bertrand Russell's Philosophy of Language. The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff.
    Still wanting is a systematic examination of the various aspects of his analytic method which, collectively, give to his philosophy of language its ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. John R. Searle (1969). Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    Written in an outstandingly clear and lively style, it provokes its readers to rethink issues they may have regarded as long since settled.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   524 citations  
  18.  21
    Robert Stainton (2006). Words and Thoughts: Subsentences, Ellipsis, and the Philosophy of Language. Published in the United States by Oxford University Press.
    It is a near truism of philosophy of language that sentences are prior to words--that they are the only things that fundamentally have meaning. Robert's Stainton's study interrogates this idea, drawing on a wide body of evidence to argue that speakers can and do use mere words, not sentences, to communicate complex thoughts.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  19. Sebastian Lutz (2012). Artificial Language Philosophy of Science. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (2):181-203.
    Artificial language philosophy (also called ‘ideal language philosophy’) is the position that philosophical problems are best solved or dissolved through a reform of language. Its underlying methodology—the development of languages for specific purposes—leads to a conventionalist view of language in general and of concepts in particular. I argue that many philosophical practices can be reinterpreted as applications of artificial language philosophy. In addition, many factually occurring interrelations between the sciences and philosophy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. William G. Lycan (2000). Philosophy of Language: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.
    Philosophy of Language introduces the non-specialist to the main issues and theories in twentieth-century philosophy of language, focusing specifically on linguistic phenomena. Part I explores several theories of how proper names, descriptions, and other terms bear a referential relation to non-linguistic objects. Part II surveys competing theories of linguistic meaning and compares their various advantages and liabilities. Part III introduces the basic concepts of linguistic pragmatics, includes a detailed discussion of the problems of indirect force, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  21.  2
    John M. Ramsey (2014). "What Is This Thing Called Philosophy of Language?," by Gary Kemp. [REVIEW] Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):280-284.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  83
    Sarah Moss (2012). The Role of Linguistics in the Philosophy of Language. In Delia Graff Fara & Gillian Russell (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language.
    This paper discusses several case studies that illustrate the relationship between the philosophy of language and three branches of linguistics: syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Among other things, I identify binding arguments in the linguistics literature preceding (Stanley 2000), and I invent binding arguments to evaluate various semantic and pragmatic theories of belief ascriptions.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Sarah Sawyer (ed.) (2009). New Waves in Philosophy of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Notes on ContributorsLinguistic Puzzles and Semantic Pretence--B.Armour-Garb &--J.Woodbridge Minimal Semantics and the Nature of Psychological Evidence--E.BorgA Naturalistic Approach to the Philosophy of Language --J.Collins In Praise of our Linguistic Intuitions--A.EverettPhenomenal Continua and Secondary Properties--P.Greenough Semantic Oughts in Context--A.Hattiangadi Content, Force and Semantic Norms--M.KlbelLinguistic Competence and Propositional Knowledge--G.LongworthExpressives and Beyond--S.PredelliAnalyticity in Externalist Languages --G.Russell Names as Predicates--S.SawyerThe Epistemic Reading of Counterfactual Conditionals--K.Schulz Introduction, Transmission, and the Foundations of Meaning--J.SpeaksIndex.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  24.  29
    Howard K. Wettstein (2004). The Magic Prism: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    The late 20th century saw great movement in the philosophy of language, often critical of the fathers of the subject-Gottlieb Frege and Bertrand Russell-but sometimes supportive of (or even defensive about) the work of the fathers. Howard Wettstein's sympathies lie with the critics. But he says that they have often misconceived their critical project, treating it in ways that are technically focused and that miss the deeper implications of their revolutionary challenge. Wettstein argues that Wittgenstein-a figure with whom (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  25.  16
    Ori Simchen (2012). Philosophy of Language: Key Thinkers by Barry Lee (Ed.). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  8
    Toula Nicolacopoulos & George Vassilacopoulos (2005). On the Systemic Meaning of Meaningless Utterances: The Place of Language in Hegel's Speculative Philosophy. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (1):17-26.
    The aim of our paper is to offer a reading of the systemic significance of Hegel’s inclusion of the concept of the sign in the ‘Psychology’ of his Philosophy of Mind. We hope to explain why it is that the Hegelian system positions a specific form of sign, the meaningless utterance, at the point of Mind’s transition from ‘mechanical memory’ to ‘Thinking’. Rather than analyse the subtle advancements in the unfolding of the self-determining activity of ‘Theoretical Mind’, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  12
    Nikolay Milkov (1992). Philosophy of Language Without Meaning, and Without... Language. In Maksim Stamenov (ed.), Current Advances in Semantic Theory, vol. 73. J. Benjamins Pub. Co. 197-203.
    The paper presetns a criticism on Donald Davidson's philosophy of language that tries to dispence with theory of meaning.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  39
    Marcelo Carvalho, Celso Braida, João Carlos Salles & Marcelo E. Coniglio (eds.) (2015). Filosofia da Linguagem e da Lógica (Philosophy of Language and Philosophy of Logic, in Portuguese). ANPOF.
  29. Aloysius Martinich (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    What is meaning? How is linguistic communication possible? What is the nature of language? What is the relationship between language and the world? How do metaphors work? The Philosophy of Language, considered the essential text in its field, is an excellent introduction to such fundamental questions. This revised edition collects forty-six of the most important articles in the field, making it the most up-to-date and comprehensive volume on the subject. Revised to address changing trends and contemporary (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  30.  1
    Léo Peruzzo Júnior (2015). Mind, Language and Society in the Philosophy of John Searle. Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 19 (1):177-181.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  25
    P. G. Ingram (1978). Art, Language and Community on Collingwood's 'Philosophy of Art'. Journal of Aesthetic and Art Criticism 37 (1):53-64.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  16
    Hidé Ishiguro (1990). Leibniz's Philosophy of Logic and Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the second edition of an important introduction to Leibniz's philosophy of logic and language first published in 1972. It takes issue with several traditional interpretations of Leibniz (by Russell amongst others) while revealing how Leibniz's thought is related to issues of great interest in current logical theory. For this new edition, the author has added new chapters on infinitesimals and conditionals as well as taking account of reviews of the first edition.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  33.  64
    Neil Dewar (2015). Symmetries and the Philosophy of Language. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 52:317-327.
    In this paper, I consider the role of exact symmetries in theories of physics, working throughout with the example of gravitation set in Newtonian spacetime. First, I spend some time setting up a means of thinking about symmetries in this context; second, I consider arguments from the seeming undetectability of absolute velocities to an anti-realism about velocities; and finally, I claim that the structure of the theory licences us to interpret models which differ only with regards to the absolute velocities (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Barry C. Smith (ed.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    Ernie Lepore and Barry Smith present the definitive reference work for this diverse and fertile field of philosophy. A superb international team contribute forty brand-new essays covering topics from the nature of language to meaning, truth, and reference, and the interfaces of philosophy of language with linguistics, psychology, logic, epistemology, and metaphysics. It will be an essential resource for anyone working in the central areas of philosophy, for linguists interested in syntax, semantics, and pragmatics, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35. Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.) (2008). The Oxford Handbook to the Philosophy of Language. OUP Oxford.
    The Oxford Handbooks series is a major new initiative in academic publishing. Each volume offers an authoritative and up-to-date survey of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned essays from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities and social sciences. -/- Ernie Lepore and Barry Smith present the definitive reference work (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Michael Morris (2007). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    In this textbook, Michael Morris offers a critical introduction to the central issues of the philosophy of language. Each chapter focusses on one or two texts which have had a seminal influence on work in the subject, and uses these as a way of approaching both the central topics and the various traditions of dealing with them. Texts include classic writings by Frege, Russell, Kripke, Quine, Davidson, Austin, Grice and Wittgenstein. Theoretical jargon is kept to a minimum and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37. Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    Ernie Lepore and Barry Smith present the definitive reference work for this diverse and fertile field of philosophy. A superb international team contribute forty brand-new essays covering topics from the nature of language to meaning, truth, and reference, and the interfaces of philosophy of language with linguistics, psychology, logic, epistemology, and metaphysics. It will be an essential resource for anyone working in the central areas of philosophy, for linguists interested in syntax, semantics, and pragmatics, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38. Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    Ernie Lepore and Barry Smith present the definitive reference work for this diverse and fertile field of philosophy. A superb international team contribute forty brand-new essays covering topics from the nature of language to meaning, truth, and reference, and the interfaces of philosophy of language with linguistics, psychology, logic, epistemology, and metaphysics. It will be an essential resource for anyone working in the central areas of philosophy, for linguists interested in syntax, semantics, and pragmatics, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  8
    Amichai Kronfeld (1990). Reference and Computation: An Essay in Applied Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This book deals with a major problem in the study of language: the problem of reference. The ease with which we refer to things in conversation is deceptive. Upon closer scrutiny, it turns out that we hardly ever tell each other explicitly what object we mean, although we expect our interlocutor to discern it. Amichai Kronfeld provides an answer to two questions associated with this: how do we successfully refer, and how can a computer be programmed to achieve this? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  51
    Albert Borgmann (1974). The Philosophy of Language. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER ONE THE ORIGIN OF THE PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE 1. The accessibility of the original reflections on language. Heraclitus The philosophy of language has ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Michael Devitt & Richard Hanley (eds.) (2006). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..
    The _Blackwell Guide to Philosophy of Language_ is a collection of twenty new essays in a cutting-edge and wide-ranging field. Surveys central issues in contemporary philosophy of language while examining foundational topics Provides pedagogical tools such as abstracts and suggestions for further readings Topics addressed include the nature of meaning, speech acts and pragmatics, figurative language, and naturalistic theories of reference.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  13
    Dorothea Frede & Brad Inwood (eds.) (2005). Language and Learning: Philosophy of Language in the Hellenistic Age. Cambridge University Press.
    Hellenistic philosophers and scholars laid the foundations upon which Western tradition developed analytical grammar, linguistics, philosophy of language and other disciplines. Building on the pioneering work of Plato, Aristotle and earlier thinkers, they developed a wide range of theories about the nature and origin of language. Ten essays explore the ancient theories, their philosophical adequacy, and their impact on later thinkers from Augustine through the Middle Ages.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. María José Frápolli (ed.) (2007). Saying, Meaning and Referring: Essays on François Recanati's Philosophy of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The distinguished philosopher of language, Francois Recanati, has proposed a wide-ranging truth-conditional model of pragmatics. In this collection, various aspects of his theories are addressed by distinguished contributors, and are then commented on or answered by Recanati himself. This allows the reader to be drawn into the central debate within philosophy of language and cognitive science as to what kind of pragmatics system is needed.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  19
    Manuel García-Carpintero & Max Kölbel (eds.) (2012). The Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Continuum International Pub..
    The Continuum Companion to Philosophy of Language offers the definitive guide to contemporary philosophy of language. The book covers all the fundamental questions asked by the philosophy of language - areas that have continued to attract interest historically as well as topics that have emerged more recently as active areas of research. Ten specially commissioned essays from an international team of experts reveal where important work continues to be done in the area and, most (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (eds.) (1997). A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..
    This volume provides a survey of contemporary philosophy of language. As well as providing a synoptic view of the key issues, figures, concepts and debates, each essay makes new and original contributions to ongoing debate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  95
    Jennifer Hornsby & Guy Longworth (eds.) (2006). Reading Philosophy of Language: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. Blackwell Pub..
    Designed for readers new to the subject, Reading Philosophy of Language presents key texts in the philosophy of language together with helpful editorial guidance. A concise collection of key texts in the philosophy of language Ideal for readers new to the subject. Features seminal texts by leading figures in the field, such as Austin, Chomsky, Davidson, Dummett and Searle. Presents three texts on each of five key topics: speech and performance; meaning and truth; knowledge (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Ernie Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.) (2005). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbooks series is a major new initiative in academic publishing. Each volume offers an authoritative and up-to-date survey of original research in a particular subject area. Specially commissioned essays from leading figures in the discipline give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates. Oxford Handbooks provide scholars and graduate students with compelling new perspectives upon a wide range of subjects in the humanities and social sciences. -/- Ernie Lepore and Barry Smith present the definitive reference work (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Limin Liu (2007). Zai Yu Yan Zhong Pan Xuan: Xian Qin Ming Jia "Gui Bian" Ming Ti de Chun Yu Yan Si Bian Li Xing Yan Jiu = Raising Questions in and of Language: A Study on Rationalistic Philosophy of Language of Pre-Qin School of Names. Sichuan da Xue Chu Ban She.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  28
    Andrea Nye (ed.) (1998). Philosophy of Language: The Big Questions. Blackwell Publishers.
    This anthology brings together a diversity of readings in the philosophy of language from the ancient Greeks to contemporary analytic, feminist, and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. R. D. Rollinger (ed.) (2010). Philosophy of Language and Other Matters in the Work of Anton Marty: Analysis and Translations. Rodopi.
    One of the most important students of Franz Brentano was Anton Marty, who made it his task to develop a philosophy of language on the basis of Brentano’s analysis of mind. It is most unfortunate that Marty does not receive the attention he deserves, primarily due to his detailed and distracting polemics. In the analysis presented here his philosophy of language and other aspects of his thought, such as his ontology , are examined first and foremost (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000