Search results for 'Philosophy of mind History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Severin Schroeder (ed.) (2001). Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Palgrave.score: 219.0
    Wittgenstein and Contemporary Philosophy of Mind aims to reassess the work of Wittgenstein in terms of its importance to contemporary debates surrounding the philosophy of mind.The first part of this study examines Wittgenstein in the context of current views on the human mind in relation to the body and behavior. The arguments confront the views of Quine and Dennett, as well as functionalism, eliminative materialism, and the current debate about consciousness. The essays that make up (...)
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  2. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 210.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, Koch discusses (...)
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  3. Louis O. Mink (1969/1987). Mind, History, and Dialectic: The Philosophy of R.G. Collingwood. Distributed by Harper & Row.score: 202.5
     
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  4. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 199.5
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection of history by formalists like Clive Bell. I then attempt to show how the arguments of people like Morris Weitz and Arthur Danto led to a re-appreciation of history by philosophers of art such as Richard Wollheim, Jerrold Levinson, Robert Stecker and others.
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  5. J. M. Kuukkanen (2009). Towards a Philosophy of the History of Thought? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):25-54.score: 199.5
    There are a large number of disciplines that are interested in the theoretical aspects of the history of thought. Their perspectives and subjects may vary, but fundamentally they have a common research interest: the history of human thinking and its products. Despite this, they are studied in relative isolation. I argue that having different subjects as specific objects of research, such as political or scientific thinking, is not a valid justification for the separation. I propose the formation of (...)
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  6. Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen (2009). Towards a Philosophy of the History of Thought? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):25-54.score: 199.5
    There are a large number of disciplines that are interested in the theoretical aspects of the history of thought. Their perspectives and subjects may vary, but fundamentally they have a common research interest: the history of human thinking and its products. Despite this, they are studied in relative isolation. I argue that having different subjects as specific objects of research, such as political or scientific thinking, is not a valid justification for the separation. I propose the formation of (...)
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  7. Giuseppina D’Oro (2008). The Ontological Backlash: Why Did Mainstream Analytic Philosophy Lose Interest in the Philosophy of History? Philosophia 36 (4):403-415.score: 192.8
    This paper seeks to explain why mainstream analytic philosophy lost interest in the philosophy of history. It suggests that the reasons why the philosophy of history no longer commands the attention of mainstream analytical philosophy may be explained by the success of an ontological backlash against the linguistic turn and a view of philosophy as a form of conceptual analysis. In brief I argue that in the 1950s and 1960s the philosophy (...)
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  8. Stephen Gaukroger (2012). What Does History Matter to the History of Philosophy? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):406-424.score: 190.5
    Abstract Contrary to most modern interpretations, in the early modern period, history was an indispensable resource for many philosophers. The different uses of history by Bacon, Gassendi, Locke, and Hume are explored to establish the role of history as a resource in early-modern philosophy.
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  9. Gerard J. P. O'Daly (1987). Augustine's Philosophy of Mind. University of California Press.score: 189.8
    CHAPTER ONE Augustine the Philosopher There are, according to Augustine in the early work entitled soliloquia, two principal (indeed, strictly speaking, ...
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  10. Lilli Alanen (1982). Studies in Cartesian Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind. Distributed by Akateeminen Kirjakauppa.score: 189.8
  11. Frederick Gustav Weiss (1969). Hegel's Critique of Aristotle's Philosophy of Mind. The Hague, Martinus Nijhoff.score: 189.8
  12. Martin Kusch (1999). Psychological Knowledge: A Social History and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 186.8
    An introduction to the workings of constructivism, Psychological Knowledge is an insightful introduction to the history of psychology and the recent philosophy of mind.
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  13. Cassandra Pinnick & George Gale (2000). Philosophy of Science and History of Science: A Troubling Interaction. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 31 (1):109-125.score: 184.5
    History and philosophy complement and overlap each other in subject matter, but the two disciplines exhibit conflict over methodology. Since Hempel's challenge to historians that they should adopt the covering law model of explanation, the methodological conflict has revolved around the respective roles of the general and the particular in each discipline. In recent years, the revival of narrativism in history, coupled with the trend in philosophy of science to rely upon case studies, joins the methodological (...)
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  14. Dun Zhang (2010). “The End of History ” and the Fate of the Philosophy of History. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):631-651.score: 183.0
    The end of history by Fukuyama is mainly based on Hegel’s treatise of the end of history and Kojeve’s corresponding interpretation. But Hegel’s end of history is a purely philosophical question, i.e., an ontological premise that must be fulfilled to complete absolute knowledge. When Kojeve further demonstrates its universal and homogeneous state, Fukuyama extends it into a political view: The victory of the Western system of freedom and democracy marks the end of the development of human (...) and Marxist theory and practice. This is a misunderstanding of Hegel. Marx analyzes, scientifically, the historical limitation of Western capitalism and maintains, by way of a kind of revolutionary teleology, the expectation of and belief in human liberation, which is the highest historical goal. His philosophy of history is hence characterized by theoretical elements from both historical scientificalness and historical teleology. (shrink)
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  15. Steve Matthews (2010). A History of Philosophy of Mind in Australasia. In N. N. Trakakis (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Monash University Publishing.score: 180.8
  16. E. J. Lowe (2000). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 178.5
    In this book Jonathan Lowe offers a lucid and wide-ranging introduction to the philosophy of mind. Using a problem-centred approach designed to stimulate as well as instruct, he begins with a general examination of the mind-body problem and moves on to detailed examination of more specific philosophical issues concerning sensation, perception, thought and language, rationality, artificial intelligence, action, personal identity and self-knowledge. His discussion is notably broad in scope, and distinctive in giving equal attention to deep metaphysical (...)
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  17. Anita Konzelmann Ziv (2008). Naturalized Rationality – A Glance at Bolzano's Philosophy of Mind. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1):1-21.score: 178.5
    Bernard Bolzano's philosophy of mind is closely related to his metaphysical conceptions of substance, adherence and force. Questions as to how the mind is working are treated in terms of efficient (causal) faculties producing simple and complex representations, conclusive and non-conclusive judgments, and meta-representational attitudes such as believing and knowing. My paper outlines the proximity of Bolzano's account of "mental forces" to contemporary accounts of faculty psychology such as Modularity Theory and Simple Heuristics. While the modularist notions (...)
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  18. Vivienne Brown (2007). Historical Interpretation, Intentionalism and Philosophy of Mind. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (1):25-62.score: 177.8
    Historiographic debates keep returning to issues of authorial intention in the interpretation of texts. This paper offers a response to these debates by differentiating between two versions of intentionalism, termed 'substantive intentionalism' and 'formal intentionalism', according to two different senses of 'identity' in the thesis that assigned meaning is identified with authorial intention, such that these two versions of intentionalism imply different ontological commitments to what are construed as the relevant authorial intentions. These distinctions and arguments are then related to (...)
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  19. Darren Abramson (2011). Philosophy of Mind Is (in Part) Philosophy of Computer Science. Minds and Machines 21 (2):203-219.score: 176.5
    In this paper I argue that whether or not a computer can be built that passes the Turing test is a central question in the philosophy of mind. Then I show that the possibility of building such a computer depends on open questions in the philosophy of computer science: the physical Church-Turing thesis and the extended Church-Turing thesis. I use the link between the issues identified in philosophy of mind and philosophy of computer science (...)
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  20. Joseph Earley (2008). How Philosophy of Mind Needs Philosophy of Chemistry. Hyle 14 (1):1 - 26.score: 175.5
    By the 1960s many, perhaps most, philosophers had adopted 'physicalism' – the view that physical causes fully account for mental activities. However, controversy persists about what counts as 'physical causes'. 'Reductive' physicalists recognize only microphysical (elementary-particle-level) causality. Many, perhaps most, physicalists are 'non-reductive' – they hold that entities considered by other 'special' sciences have causal powers. Philosophy of chemistry can help resolve main issues in philosophy of mind in three ways: developing an extended mereology applicable to chemical (...)
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  21. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (2007/1972). Hegel's Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press,.score: 175.5
    Hegel is an immensely important yet difficult philosopher. His Philosophy of Mind is one of the main pillars of his thought. Michael Inwood, highly respected for his previous work on Hegel, presents this central work to the modern reader in an accurate new translation supported by a philosophically sophisticated editorial introduction and elucidating scholarly commentary.
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  22. Stephen Puryear (2009). Review of Janice Thomas, The Minds of the Moderns: Rationalism, Empiricism and Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 175.5
    In this work Thomas surveys the contributions of (pre-Kantian) early modern philosophy to our understanding of the mind. She focuses on the six canonical figures of the period -- Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Hume -- and asks what each has to say about five topics within the philosophy of mind. The topics are (1) the ontological status of mind, (2) the scope and nature of self-knowledge, (3) the nature of consciousness, (4) the problem (...)
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  23. William P. Bechtel (1988). Philosophy of Mind: An Overview for Cognitive Science. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 175.5
    Specifically designed to make the philosophy of mind intelligible to those not trained in philosophy, this book provides a concise overview for students and researchers in the cognitive sciences. Emphasizing the relevance of philosophical work to investigations in other cognitive sciences, this unique text examines such issues as the meaning of language, the mind-body problem, the functionalist theories of cognition, and intentionality. As he explores the philosophical issues, Bechtel draws connections between philosophical views and theoretical and (...)
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  24. David Braddon-Mitchell (2007). The Philosophy of Mind and Cognition. Blackwell Pub..score: 175.5
    David Braddon-Mitchell and Frank Jackson’s popular introduction to philosophy of mind and cognition is now available in a fully revised and updated edition. Ensures that the most recent developments in the philosophy of mind and cognitive science are brought together into a coherent, accessible whole. Revisions respond to feedback from students and teachers and make the volume even more useful for courses. New material includes: a section on Descartes’ famous objection to materialism; extended treatment of connectionism; (...)
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  25. Steven W. Horst (2007). Beyond Reduction: Philosophy of Mind and Post-Reductionist Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 175.5
    Contemporary philosophers of mind tend to assume that the world of nature can be reduced to basic physics. Yet there are features of the mind consciousness, intentionality, normativity that do not seem to be reducible to physics or neuroscience. This explanatory gap between mind and brain has thus been a major cause of concern in recent philosophy of mind. Reductionists hold that, despite all appearances, the mind can be reduced to the brain. Eliminativists hold (...)
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  26. Carsten Held, Markus Knauff & Gottfried Vosgerau (eds.) (2006). Mental Models and the Mind: Current Developments in Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. Elsevier.score: 175.5
    "Cognitive psychology," "cognitive neuroscience," and "philosophy of mind" are names for three very different scientific fields, but they label aspects of the same scientific goal: to understand the nature of mental phenomena. Today, the three disciplines strongly overlap under the roof of the cognitive sciences. The book's purpose is to present views from the different disciplines on one of the central theories in cognitive science: the theory of mental models. Cognitive psychologists report their research on the representation and (...)
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  27. Ezio Di Nucci & Conor McHugh (eds.) (2006). Content, Consciousness, and Perception: Essays in Contemporary Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge Scholars Press.score: 175.5
    What sort of thing is the mind? And how can such a thing at the same time - belong to the natural world, - represent the world, - give rise to our subjective experience, - and ground human knowledge? Content, Consciousness and Perception is an edited collection, comprising eleven new contributions to the philosophy of mind, written by some of the most promising young philosophers in the UK and Ireland. The book is arranged into three parts. Part (...)
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  28. John Heil (ed.) (2004). Philosophy of Mind: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge.score: 175.5
    This comprehensive textbook, written by a leading author in the field, provides a survey of mainstream conceptions of the nature of mind accessible to readers with little or no background in philosophy. Included are the dualist, behaviourist, and functionalist accounts of the nature of mind, along with a critical assessment of recent trends in the subject. The problem of consciousness, widely thought to be the chief roadblock to our understanding of the mind, is addressed throughout the (...)
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  29. William Jaworski (2011). Philosophy of Mind: A Comprehensive Introduction. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 175.5
    Philosophy of mind is an incredibly active field thanks in part to the recent explosion of work in the sciences of the mind. ...
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  30. Brian P. McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.) (2009/2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 175.5
    The study of the mind has always been one of the main preoccupations of philosophers, and has been a booming area of research in recent decades, with remarkable advances in psychology and neuroscience. Oxford University Press now presents the most authoritative and comprehensive guide ever published to the philosophy of mind. An outstanding international team of contributors offer 45 specially written critical surveys of a wide range of topics relating to the mind. The first two sections (...)
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  31. Peter Smith & Jones O. R. (1986). The Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge University Press.score: 175.5
    This is a straightforward, elementary textbook for beginning students of philosophy. The general aim is to provide a clear introduction to the main issues arising in the philosophy of mind. Part I discusses the Cartesian dualist view which many find initially appealing, and contains a careful examination of arguments for and against. Part II introduces the broadly functionalist type of physicalism which has Aristotelian roots. This approach is developed to yield accounts of perception, action, belief and desire, (...)
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  32. Scott M. Christensen & Dale R. Turner (eds.) (1993). Folk Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind. L. Erlbaum.score: 175.5
    Within the past ten years, the discussion of the nature of folk psychology and its role in explaining behavior and thought has become central to the philosophy of mind. However, no comprehensive account of the contemporary debate or collection of the works that make up this debate has yet been available. Intending to fill this gap, this volume begins with the crucial background for the contemporary debate and proceeds with a broad range of responses to and developments of (...)
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  33. Jacques Brunschwig & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1993). Passions & Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum. Cambridge University Press.score: 175.5
    The philosophers of the Hellenistic schools in ancient Greece and Rome (Epicureans, Stoics, Sceptics, Academics, Cyrenaics) made important contributions to the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of psychology. This volume, which contains the proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum, describes and analyses their contributions on issues such as: the nature of perception, imagination and belief; the nature of the passions and their role in action; the relationship between mind and body; freedom and determinism; the role (...)
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  34. Pete Mandik (2010). Key Terms in Philosophy of Mind. Continuum.score: 175.5
    Introduction: What is philosophy of mind? -- The key terms -- The key thinkers -- The key texts.
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  35. Xiaogang Ke (2006). A Phenomenological Reading of Hegel's Concept of History of Philosophy: An Analysis of “the Gallery of Opinions”, “the Gallery of Knowledge” and “the Gallery of Dresden”. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (1):51-59.score: 175.5
    From a phenomenological perspective of game-space and horizon, this paper tries to make a deconstructive reading of Hegel's "two galleries", namely, "the gallery of opinions" and "the gallery of knowledge", which are mentioned in the introduction of Hegel's Lectures on the History of Philosophy. The reading shows that the Game-space or the ab-gruendiger Grund of the Hegelian concept of philosophical history lies in an originally differencing space that is keeping in absence, which is called by Edmund Husserl (...)
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  36. Paulo Abrantes (2010). Philosophy of Mind. J. Kim [Resenha]. Principia 1 (2):312-325.score: 175.5
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  37. István Aranyosi (2013). The Peripheral Mind: Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System. Oxford University Press.score: 175.5
    Philosophers of mind, both in the conceptual analysis tradition and in the empirical informed school, have been implicitly neglecting the potential conceptual role of the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) in understanding sensory and perceptual states. Instead, the philosophical as well as the neuroscientific literature has been assuming that it is the Central Nervous System (CNS) alone, and more exactly the brain, that should prima facie be taken as conceptually and empirically crucial for a philosophical analysis of such states This (...)
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  38. Ansgar Beckermann & Brian P. McLaughlin (eds.) (2009/2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 175.5
    The study of the mind has always been one of the main preoccupations of philosophers, and has been a booming area of research in recent decades, with remarkable advances in psychology and neuroscience. Oxford University Press now presents the most authoritative and comprehensive guide ever published to the philosophy of mind. An outstanding international team of contributors offer 45 specially written critical surveys of a wide range of topics relating to the mind. The first two sections (...)
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  39. David J. Chalmers (ed.) (2002). Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press.score: 175.5
    What is the mind? Is consciousness a process in the brain? How do our minds represent the world? Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings is a grand tour of writings on these and other perplexing questions about the nature of the mind. The most comprehensive collection of its kind, the book includes sixty-three selections that range from the classical contributions of Descartes to the leading edge of contemporary debates. Extensive sections cover foundational issues, the nature (...)
     
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  40. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1971). Hegel's Philosophy of Mind: Being Part Three of the 'Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences' (1830). Oxford,Clarendon Press.score: 175.5
    Hegel is an immensely important yet difficult philosopher. His Philosophy of Mind is one of the main pillars of his thought. Michael Inwood, highly respected for his previous work on Hegel, presents this central work to the modern reader in an accurate new translation supported by a philosophically sophisticated editorial introduction and elucidating scholarly commentary.
     
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  41. Brian P. McLaughlin & Jonathan D. Cohen (eds.) (2007). Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell Pub..score: 175.5
    Contemporary Debates in Philosophy of Mind showcases the leading contributors to the field, debating the major questions in philosophy of mind today. Comprises 20 newly commissioned essays on hotly debated issues in the philosophy of mind Written by a cast of leading experts in their fields, essays take opposing views on 10 central contemporary debates A thorough introduction provides a comprehensive background to the issues explored Organised into three sections which explore the ontology of (...)
     
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  42. Ian Ravenscroft (2005). Philosophy of Mind: A Beginner's Guide. Oxford University Press.score: 175.5
    Designed specifically for students with no background knowledge in the subject, this accessible introduction covers all of the basic concepts and major theories in the philosophy of mind. Topics discussed include dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, functionalism, the computational theory of mind, connectionism, physicalism, mental causation, and consciousness. The text is enhanced by chapter summaries, a glossary, suggestions for further reading, and self-assessment questions.
     
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  43. Mel Thompson (2004). Teach Yourself Philosophy of Mind. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 175.5
    From Plato's cave to Dennett's emergent systems, Teach Yourself Philosophy of Mind explores more than two millennia of thought on the knottiest of all philosophical questions. What is the mind? Is it a function of language, a neuropsychological artifact, or a metaphysical essence? Will machines ever be conscious? Is free will just an illusion? Beginning with the pre-Socratics and moving up through the latest in cognitive science, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence, this book explores major thinking on consciousness, (...)
     
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  44. Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.) (2010). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.score: 174.8
    This collection opens a dialogue between process philosophy and contemporary consciousness studies. Approaching consciousness from diverse disciplinary perspectives—philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, neuropathology, psychotherapy, biology, animal ethology, and physics—the contributors offer empirical and philosophical support for a model of consciousness inspired by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead (1861–1947). Whitehead’s model is developed in ways he could not have anticipated to show how it can advance current debates beyond well-known sticking points. This has trenchant consequences for epistemology and (...)
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  45. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2008). In Defence of Metanarrative in the Philosophy of History. Interstitio. East European Review of Historical Anthropology 2 (1):7-22.score: 174.0
    The aim of this paper is to consider the standard objections put against the construction of metanarratives in the philosophy of history. The author distinguishes following intelectual sources questioning the grasp of Entirety in the philosophy of history: anti-naturalistic German philosophy of science, dogmatic Marxism, liberalism and postmodernism. Analysis of the content of these stances allows for disclose of hidden methodological and theoretical premises which are responsible for misunderstanding and critique of the historiosophical discourse.
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  46. Admir Skodo (2013). Analytical Philosophy and the Philosophy of Intellectual History: A Critical Comparison and Interpretation. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):137-161.score: 173.3
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  47. Crispin Wright & Annalisa Coliva (eds.) (2012). Mind, Meaning, and Knowledge: Themes From the Philosophy of Crispin Wright. Oxford University Press.score: 172.5
    This volume is a collective exploration of major themes in the work of Crispin Wright, one of today's leading philosophers. These newly commissioned papers are divided into four sections, preceded by a substantial Introduction, which places them in the context of the development of Wright's ideas. The distinguished contributors address issues such as the rule-following problem, knowledge of our meanings and minds, truth, realism, anti-realism and relativism, as well as the nature of perceptual justification, the cogency of arguments such as (...)
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  48. Daria Drozdova (2011). Cristina Chimisso . Writing the History of the Mind: Philosophy and Science in France, 1900 to 1960s . Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008. Pp. Ix+209. £55.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (2):348-351.score: 172.5
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  49. Alan G. Soble (2003). The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.score: 171.0
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is examined in (...)
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  50. Aaron D. Cobb (2011). History and Scientific Practice in the Construction of an Adequate Philosophy of Science: Revisiting a Whewell/Mill Debate. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):85-93.score: 171.0
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