Search results for 'Philosophy of nature History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pauline Kleingeld (2001). Nature or Providence? On the Theoretical and Moral Importance of Kant’s Philosophy of History. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (2):201-219.score: 1188.0
    Kant’s use of the terms ‘Nature’ and ‘Providence’ in his essays on history has long puzzled commentators. Kant personifies Nature and Providence in a curious way, by speaking of them as “deciding” to give humankind certain predispositions, “wanting” these to be developed, and “knowing” what is best for humans Moreover, he leaves the relationship between the two terms unclear. In this essay, I argue that Kant’s use of ‘Nature’ and ‘Providence’ can be clarified and explained. Moreover, (...)
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  2. Markus Schrenk (2010). Mauro Dorato * The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (E-Version) 62 (1):225-232.score: 1074.0
    This is a review of Mauro Dorato's book "The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature".
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  3. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 890.0
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, Koch discusses (...)
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  4. R. G. Collingwood (1924). The Nature and Aims of a Philosophy of History. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 25:151-174.score: 834.0
  5. Robert A. Di Curcio (1975). The Natural Philosophy of the Greeks: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Science. Aeternium Pub..score: 828.0
  6. James Wilberding & Christoph Horn (eds.) (2012). Neoplatonism and the Philosophy of Nature. Oxford UP.score: 827.0
    This volume dispels the idea that Platonism was an otherworldly enterprise which neglected the study of the natural world. Leading scholars examine how the Platonists of late antiquity sought to understand and explain natural phenomena: their essays offer a new understanding of the metaphysics of Platonism, and its place in the history of science.
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  7. Daniel E. Shannon (2013). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature of 1805-6; Its Relation to the Phenomenology of Spirit. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):101-132.score: 797.0
    800x600 Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (1807) was supposed to be the introduction and first part of the Jena System III, and as such it was to introduce us to the other parts of the project. Most commentators on Hegel’s Phenomenology , however, do not consider how the Phenomenology relates the other parts, and some discount Hegel understanding and commitment to the natural philosophy of his day. This paper attempts to make the connection between the Phenomenology and the Natural (...) of 1805-06 explicit; to show where and how the connections are made; to identify how Hegel uses the natural sciences of his day in creating his system. By showing this I hope to prove that his concept of Spirit is born within his natural philosophy. It is part of his cosmology. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}. (shrink)
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  8. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1970/2004). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature. Oxford,Clarendon Press.score: 786.0
    This is a much-needed reissue of the standard English translation of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature, originally published in 1970. The Philosophy of Nature is the second part of Hegel's Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, all of which is now available in English from OUP (Part I being his Logic, Part III being his Philosophy of Mind). Hegel's aim in this work is to interpret the varied phenomena of Nature from the standpoint of a dialectical (...)
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  9. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1970/2004). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature: Being Part Two of the Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences (1830), Translated From Nicolin and Pöggeler's Edition (1959), and From the Zusätze in Michelet's Text (1847). [REVIEW] Oxford University Press.score: 786.0
    This is a much-needed reissue of the standard English translation of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature, originally published in 1970. The Philosophy of Nature is the second part of Hegel's Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, all of which is now available in English from OUP (Part I being his Logic, Part III being his Philosophy of Mind). Hegel's aim in this work is to interpret the varied phenomena of Nature from the standpoint of a dialectical (...)
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  10. David J. Furley (1966/1989). Cosmic Problems: Essays on Greek and Roman Philosophy of Nature. Cambridge University Press.score: 783.0
    Cambridge English Worldwide offers: - a school-based approach with links to other subject areas throughout the course, and to other classes in different countries - content and concepts related to learners' ages and levels of ability - an organisation based on the realities of teaching English at school: mixed abilities, mixed motivation, time available, and class size - material developed and successfully piloted in collaboration with teachers and classes in many parts of the world. The course consists of six levels: (...)
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  11. David Ludwig (2012). Language and Human Nature. Kurt Goldstein's Neurolinguistic Foundation of a Holistic Philosophy. Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences 48 (1):40-54.score: 774.0
  12. Astrida Orle Tantillo (2002). The Will to Create: Goethe's Philosophy of Nature. University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 771.0
    This makes The Will to Create accessible to a wide audience, including philosophers, historians of science, and literary theorists, as well as general readers.
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  13. Iain Hamilton Grant (2006/2008). Philosophies of Nature After Schelling. Continuum International Pub. Group.score: 771.0
    Preface to paperback edition -- Why Schelling? why naturephilosophy? -- The powers due to becoming: the reemergence of platonic physics in the genetic philosophy -- Antiphysics and neo-Fichteanism -- The natural history of the unthinged -- "What thinks in me is what is outside me". phenomenality, physics and the idea -- Dynamic philosophy, transcendental physics -- Conclusion: transcendental geology.
     
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  14. Peter Dear (2006). The Intelligibility of Nature: How Science Makes Sense of the World. University of Chicago Press.score: 768.0
    Throughout the history of the Western world, science has possessed an extraordinary amount of authority and prestige. And while its pedestal has been jostled by numerous evolutions and revolutions, science has always managed to maintain its stronghold as the knowing enterprise that explains how the natural world works: we treat such legendary scientists as Galileo, Newton, Darwin, and Einstein with admiration and reverence because they offer profound and sustaining insight into the meaning of the universe. In The Intelligibility of (...)
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  15. John Torrance (ed.) (1992). The Concept of Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 768.0
    In this stimulating work, six distinguished authors describe the major phases in the development of scientific conceptions of nature, from classical Greece to the present. Geoffrey Lloyd shows how different ideas of nature originated in the polemics of ancient Athens. Alexander Murray analyzes medieval conceptions of nature in terms of contrasts between learned and unlearned, between schools of thought, and between Christianity and Greek philosophy. Richard Westfall argues that the essence of the scientific revolution of the (...)
     
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  16. Michael R. Matthews (1994). Science Teaching: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 756.0
    History, Philosophy and Science Teaching argues that science teaching and science teacher education can be improved if teachers know something of the history and philosophy of science and if these topics are included in the science curriculum. The history and philosophy of science have important roles in many of the theoretical issues that science educators need to address: the goals of science education; what constitutes an appropriate science curriculum for all students; how science should (...)
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  17. Phillip R. Sloan (2006). Kant on the History of Nature: The Ambiguous Heritage of the Critical Philosophy for Natural History. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (4):627-648.score: 711.0
  18. J. Roberts (2006). M. Dorato, The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Laws of Nature, Ashgate, Aldershot (2005) ISBN 0754639940 (174pp. £ 40.00 Hardback). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (4):738-744.score: 708.0
  19. John David North, John J. Roche & A. C. Crombie (eds.) (1985). The Light of Nature: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science Presented to A.C. Crombie. Distributors for the United States and Canada Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 702.0
    INTRODUCTION This volume of essays is meant as a tribute to Alistair Crombie by some of those who have studied with him. The occasion of its publication is ...
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  20. John H. Zammito (2008). Kant's "Naturalistic" History of Mankind? Some Reservations. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):29-62.score: 684.0
    Among many important claims, Allen Wood in Kant's Ethical ought proposes that Kant's philosophy of history can be grasped as a "naturalist" approach, grounding human nature in biology. I suggest some reservations. First, I question Kant's conception of biology as (a still emergent) science. Second, I question Kant's extension of his notion of "natural predisposition" to reason and freedom. Third, I question the naturalism of Kant's philosophy of history by suggesting the excessive role providence must (...)
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  21. Robert C. Solomon (1979/1984). History and Human Nature: A Philosophical Review of European Philosophy and Culture, 1750-1850. University Press of America.score: 672.0
  22. Carolyn Merchant (2003). Reinventing Eden: The Fate of Nature in Western Culture. Routledge.score: 666.0
    Visionary quests to return to the Garden of Eden have shaped Western culture from Columbus' voyages to today's tropical island retreats. Few narratives are so powerful - and, as Carolyn Merchant shows, so misguided and destructive - as the dream of recapturing a lost paradise. A sweeping account of these quixotic endeavors by one of America's leading environmentalists, Reinventing Eden traces the idea of rebuilding the primeval garden from its origins to its latest incarnations in shopping malls, theme parks and (...)
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  23. A. Jacob (1992). De Naturae Natura: A Study of Idealistic Conceptions of Nature and the Unconscious. F. Steiner.score: 644.0
    The sections on Schelling, Eschenmayer, and Schopenhauer in Chapters VI and IX appear in the 1992 Schopenhauer Jahrbuch as “From the World-Soul to the Will: The natural philosophy of Schelling, Eschenmayer, and Schopenhauer”.
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  24. Bernd Warlich (1974). “State of Nature” and the “Natural History” of Bourgeois Society. The Origins of Bourgeois Social Theory as a Philosophy of History and Social Science in Samuel Pufendorf, John Locke and Adam Smith. Philosophy and History 7 (2):153-157.score: 642.0
  25. Nicolaas A. Rupke (1983). The Study of Fossils in the Romantic Philosophy of History and Nature. History of Science 21:389-413.score: 642.0
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  26. M. C. Lemon (2003). Philosophy of History: A Guide for Students. Routledge.score: 636.0
    This work is an essential introduction to the vast body of writing about history, from classical Greece and Rome to the contemporary world. M.C. Lemon maps out key debates and central concepts of philosophy of history placing principal thinkers in the context of their times and schools of thought. Lemon explains the crucial differences between speculative philosophy as an n enquiry into the course and meaning of history and analytic philosophy of history as (...)
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  27. C. Chimisso (2003). The Tribunal of Philosophy and its Norms: History and Philosophy in Georges Canguilhem's Historical Epistemology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (2):297-327.score: 636.0
    In this article I assess Georges Canguilhem's historical epistemology with both theoretical and historical questions in mind. From a theoretical point of view, I am concerned with the relation between history and philosophy, and in particular with the philosophical assumptions and external norms that are involved in history writing. Moreover, I am concerned with the role that history can play in the understanding and evaluation of philosophical concepts. From a historical point of view, I regard historical (...)
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  28. A. Nuri Yurdusev (2003). International Relations and the Philosophy of History: A Civilizational Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 636.0
    International Relations and the Philosophy of History examines the concept of civilization in relation to international systems through an extensive use of the literature in the philosophy of history. A. Nuri Yurdusev demonstrates the relevance of a civilizational approach to the study of contemporary international relations by looking at the multi-civilizational nature of the modern international system, the competing claims of national and civilizational identities and the rise of civilizational consciousness after the Cold War.
     
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  29. J. Elster & M. Dascal (1988). The Nature and Scope of Rational-Choice Explanation in Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:51-79.score: 630.0
     
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  30. Lorraine Daston & Fernando Vidal (eds.) (2004). The Moral Authority of Nature. University of Chicago Press.score: 624.0
    For thousands of years, people have used nature to justify their political, moral, and social judgments. Such appeals to the moral authority of nature are still very much with us today, as heated debates over genetically modified organisms and human cloning testify. The Moral Authority of Nature offers a wide-ranging account of how people have used nature to think about what counts as good, beautiful, just, or valuable. The eighteen essays cover a diverse array of topics, (...)
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  31. Lloyd P. Gerson (1990/1994). God and Greek Philosophy: Studies in the Early History of Natural Theology. Routledge.score: 624.0
    THE PRE-SOCRATIC ORIGINS OF NATURAL THEOLOGY § INTRODUCTION St Augustine informs us that pagan philosophers divided theology into three parts: () civic ...
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  32. Ron Tobias (2011). Film and the American Moral Vision of Nature: Theodore Roosevelt to Walt Disney. Michigan State University Press.score: 624.0
    Introduction -- Tales of dominion -- The plow and the gun -- Picturing the West, 1883-1893 -- American idol, 1898 -- The end of nature -- African romance -- The dark continent -- When cowboys go to heaven -- Transplanting Africa -- Of ape-men, sex, and cannibal kings -- Adventures in monkeyland -- Nature, the film -- The world scrubbed clean.
     
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  33. Anthony Kenny (ed.) (1997). The Oxford Illustrated History of Western Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 618.0
    Written by a team of distinguished scholars, this is an authoritative and comprehensive history of Western philosophy from its earliest beginnings to the present day. Illustrated with over 150 color and black-and-white pictures, chosen to illuminate and complement the text, this lively and readable work is an ideal introduction to philosophy for anyone interested in the history of ideas. From Plato's Republic and St. Augustine's Confessions through Marx's Capital and Sartre's Being and Nothingness, the extraordinary philosophical (...)
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  34. Anthony Kenny (ed.) (1994). The Oxford History of Western Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 618.0
    From Plato's Republic and St. Augustine's Confessions through Marx's Capital and Sartre's Being and Nothingness, the extraordinary philosophical dialogue between great Western minds has flourished unabated through the ages. Dazzling in its genius and breadth, the long line of European and American intellectual discourse tells a remarkable story--a quest for truth and wisdom that continues to shape our most basic ideas about human nature and the world around us. That quest is brilliantly brought to life in The Oxford (...) of Western Philosophy. Featuring hundreds of spectacular illustrations--including sixteen pages of full-color plates--this splendidly written volume takes the reader on a magnificient chronological tour through the revolutions of thought that have forged the Western philosophical tradition from ancient times to the present. Throughout, the six contributors--an internationally renowned team of philosophers including Roger Scruton, Anthony Quinton, and Anthony Kenny--bring the astonishingly diverse, wide-ranging landscape of intellectual history into sharp focus, emphasizing how notions seen today as part of an inevitable march of ideas were in their own time often considered radical, if not revolutionary. Thus we are treated, for example, to lively accounts of how Plato's "theory of forms" and Aristotle's pioneering exercises in logic broke with the past to irrevocably alter the course of Western thought. The authors also reveal the relationships between landmark thinkers, and the ways they drew on their intellectual heritage. They show, for instance, how St. Augustine and Aquinas, though advancing the cause of Christian doctrine, picked up where their pagan Greek forebears had left off. We witness how, during the Renaissance, the profound empiricist ideas underlying Descarte's famous utterance--"I think, therefore I exist"--lived in a tense but complementary relationship with Locke's rationalist theories. Moving into the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the book explores how Hume greatly influenced Kant's conception of the "transcendental aesthetic," and how Hegel drew upon the lesser known (but groundbreaking) work of Fichte and Schelling. The authors bring the story up to our own time, vividly recounting the existential trend from Nietzsche ("God is dead") to Sartre, along with other increasingly fractious schools of thought. Along the way, we not only encounter the vast intellectual riches of the Western mind, but we also meet the personalities behind the great thoughts, from the saintly Hume (described by Adam Smith as having "come as near to perfection as anybody could") to the ill-mannered outcast Fichte. And the hundreds of maps and striking illustrations (including full-color reproductions of art ranging from medieval manuscripts to the works of Raphael, Ingres, and Magritte) form an integral part of the book, revealing the interweaving of art and ideas through the ages, as artists have striven to give visual immediacy to philosophical concepts. The Oxford History of Western Philosophy is the most authoritative single-volume account ever written for the general reader. Engagingly written and astonishingly far-reaching, it provides the consummate introduction to the intellectual bedrock upon which Western civilization is built. (shrink)
     
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  35. Robert C. Solomon (1996). A Short History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 618.0
    In this accessible and comprehensive work, Robert Solomon and Kathleen Higgins cover the entire history of philosophy--ancient, medieval, and modern, from cultures both East and West--in its broader historical and cultural contexts. Major philosophers and movements are discussed along with less well-known but interesting figures. The authors examine the early Greek, Indic, and Chinese philosophers and the mythological traditions that preceded them, as well as the great religious philosophies, including Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, and Taoism. Easily understandable to students (...)
     
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  36. Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). Philosophy of Nature, Realism, and the Postulated Ontology of Scientific Theories. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Philosophy of Nature Today, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa. 59–80.score: 614.3
    The first part of the paper is a metatheoretical consideration of such philosophy of nature which allows for using scientific results in philosophical analyses. An epistemological 'judgment' of those results becomes a preliminary task of this discipline: this involves taking a position in the controversy between realistic and antirealistic accounts of science. It is shown that a philosopher of nature has to be a realist, if his task to build true ontology of reality is to be achieved. (...)
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  37. Allen W. Wood & Songsuk Susan Hahn (eds.) (2011). Cambridge History of Philosophy in the 19th Century (1790-1870). Cambridge University Press.score: 614.0
    The latest volume in the Cambridge Histories of Philosophy series, The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century brings together twenty-nine leading experts in the field and covers the years 1790-1870. Their twenty-seven chapters provide a comprehensive survey of the period, organizing the material topically. After a brief editor's introduction, it begins with three chapters surveying the background of nineteenth century philosophy: followed by two on logic and mathematics, two on nature and natural science, (...)
     
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  38. Allen W. Wood & Songsuk Susan Hahn (eds.) (2011). The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790-1870). Cambridge University Press.score: 614.0
    The latest volume in the Cambridge Histories of Philosophy series, The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century brings together twenty-nine leading experts in the field and covers the years 1790-1870. Their twenty-seven chapters provide a comprehensive survey of the period, organizing the material topically. After a brief editor's introduction, it begins with three chapters surveying the background of nineteenth century philosophy: followed by two on logic and mathematics, two on nature and natural science, (...)
     
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  39. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (1997). History of Jewish Philosophy. Routledge.score: 612.0
    Consciously writing from a Jewish background, thirty-five esteemed authors, from Britain, Canada, Israel, and the United States cover the whole breadth of Jewish philosophy, concentrating upon the philosophical interest of the ideas themselves. The contributors to this work explore numerous issues raised in the text of the Bible and in the history of the Jewish people, and discuss the major schools of thought and most serious controversies of ancient and modern Jewish philosophy. Topics include postmodern techniques, the (...)
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  40. Knud Haakonssen (ed.) (2006). The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 612.0
    More than thirty eminent scholars from nine different countries have contributed to The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy - the most comprehensive and up-to-date history of the subject available in English. For the eighteenth century the dominant concept in philosophy was human nature and so it is around this concept that the work is centered. This allows the contributors to offer both detailed explorations of the epistemological, metaphysical and ethical themes that continue to stand at (...)
     
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  41. Donald Phillip Verene (2008). The History of Philosophy: A Reader's Guide: Including a List of 100 Great Philosophical Works From the Pre-Socratics to the Mid-Twentieth Century. Northwestern University Press.score: 612.0
    With the aim of guiding readers along, in Hegel’s words, “the long process of education towards genuine philosophy,” this introduction emphasizes the importance of striking up a conversation with the past. Only by looking to past masters and their works, it holds, can old memories and prior thought be brought fully to bear on the present. This living past invigorates contemporary practice, enriching today’s study and discoveries. In this book, groundbreaking philosopher and author Donald Verene addresses two themes: why (...)
     
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  42. Max Kistler (2007). Causation and Laws of Nature. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge.score: 606.0
    Causation is important. It is, as Hume said, the cement of the universe, and lies at the heart of our conceptual structure. Causation is one of the most fundamental tools we have for organizing our apprehension of the external world and ourselves. But philosophers' disagreement about the correct interpretation of causation is as limitless as their agreement about its importance. The history of attempts to elucidate the nature of this concept and to situate it with respect to other (...)
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  43. J. A. van Ruler (1995). The Crisis of Causality: Voetius and Descartes on God, Nature, and Change. E.J. Brill.score: 606.0
    This study on the reception of Cartesianism is the result of a four-year fellowship as assistant-in-training at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Groningen. Zie: Preface.
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  44. Owen Goldin & Patricia Kilroe (eds.) (1997). Human Life and the Natural World: Readings in the History of Western Philosophy. Broadview Press.score: 606.0
    Human concern over the urgency of current environmental issues increasingly entails wide-ranging discussions of how we may rethink the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world. In order to provide a context for such discussions this anthology provides a selection of some of the most important, interesting and influential readings on the subject from classical times through to the late nineteenth century. Included are such figures as Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Hildegard of Bingen, St Francis of Assisi, Bacon, (...)
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  45. Shannon Mussett (2003). On the Threshold of History: The Role of Nature and Africa in Hegel’s Philosophy. The American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and the Black Experience 3 (1):39-46.score: 606.0
     
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  46. Noel Carroll (2012). History and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):370-382.score: 598.5
    Abstract In this essay I trace the role of history in the philosophy of art from the early twentieth century to the present, beginning with the rejection of history by formalists like Clive Bell. I then attempt to show how the arguments of people like Morris Weitz and Arthur Danto led to a re-appreciation of history by philosophers of art such as Richard Wollheim, Jerrold Levinson, Robert Stecker and others.
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  47. J. M. Kuukkanen (2009). Towards a Philosophy of the History of Thought? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):25-54.score: 598.5
    There are a large number of disciplines that are interested in the theoretical aspects of the history of thought. Their perspectives and subjects may vary, but fundamentally they have a common research interest: the history of human thinking and its products. Despite this, they are studied in relative isolation. I argue that having different subjects as specific objects of research, such as political or scientific thinking, is not a valid justification for the separation. I propose the formation of (...)
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  48. Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen (2009). Towards a Philosophy of the History of Thought? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (1):25-54.score: 598.5
    There are a large number of disciplines that are interested in the theoretical aspects of the history of thought. Their perspectives and subjects may vary, but fundamentally they have a common research interest: the history of human thinking and its products. Despite this, they are studied in relative isolation. I argue that having different subjects as specific objects of research, such as political or scientific thinking, is not a valid justification for the separation. I propose the formation of (...)
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  49. Anthony Burns (2011). Conceptual History and the Philosophy of the Later Wittgenstein: A Critique of Quentin Skinners Contextualist Method. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):54-83.score: 595.0
    Although first published in 1969, the methodological views advanced in Quentin Skinner's “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas” remain relevant today. In his article Skinner suggests that it would be inappropriate to even attempt to write the history of any idea or concept. In support of this view, Skinner advances two arguments, one derived from the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein and the other from that of J. L. Austin. In this paper I focus on (...)
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  50. Penelope Deutscher (1997). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.score: 594.0
    Yielding Gender explores and reconsiders the tensions that deconstruction poses for feminist philosophy. Emphasizing the important role of deconstruction in revealing the ambiguity and unstable nature of gender, Penelope Deutscher asks the crucial question: does the very instability of gender mean that we can no longer talk of a man or a woman of reason in the history of philosophy? Using the work of Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, Deutscher explores this question by examining (...)
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