Search results for 'Philosophy of nature in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Newton Phelps Stallknecht (1977). Strange Seas of Thought: Studies in William Wordsworth's Philosophy of Man and Nature. Greenwood Press.score: 303.6
     
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  2. Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). Philosophy of Nature, Realism, and the Postulated Ontology of Scientific Theories. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Philosophy of Nature Today, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa. 59–80.score: 264.6
    The first part of the paper is a metatheoretical consideration of such philosophy of nature which allows for using scientific results in philosophical analyses. An epistemological 'judgment' of those results becomes a preliminary task of this discipline: this involves taking a position in the controversy between realistic and antirealistic accounts of science. It is shown that a philosopher of nature has to be a realist, if his task to build true ontology of reality is to be achieved. (...)
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  3. Marije Martijn (2010). Proclus on Nature: Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Brill.score: 256.8
    One of the hardest questions to answer for a (Neo)platonist is to what extent and how the changing and unreliable world of sense perception can itself be an object of scientific knowledge. My dissertation is a study of the answer given to that question by the Neoplatonist Proclus (Athens, 411-485) in his Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. I present a new explanation of Proclus’ concept of nature and show that philosophy of nature consists of several related subdisciplines matching (...)
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  4. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1970/2004). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature: Being Part Two of the Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences (1830), Translated From Nicolin and Pöggeler's Edition (1959), and From the Zusätze in Michelet's Text (1847). [REVIEW] Oxford University Press.score: 256.8
    This is a much-needed reissue of the standard English translation of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature, originally published in 1970. The Philosophy of Nature is the second part of Hegel's Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, all of which is now available in English from OUP (Part I being his Logic, Part III being his Philosophy of Mind). Hegel's aim in this work is to interpret the varied phenomena of Nature from the standpoint of a dialectical (...)
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  5. Shiling Xiang (2008). A Study on the Theory of “Returning to the Original” and “Recovering Nature” in Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):502-519.score: 246.6
    The approach of returning to the original and recovering nature is a typical characteristic of Chinese philosophy. It was founded by the Daoist School and followed by both Daoist and Confucian schools. The precondition of returning to the original and recovering nature is the stillness and goodness within nature integrated into a whole afterwards. Its implementation includes not only returning to the original root so as to achieve the philosophical aim but also restoration (...)
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  6. Lawrence D. Roberts (ed.) (1982). Approaches to Nature in the Middle Ages: Papers of the Tenth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies. Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies.score: 238.2
     
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  7. Weidong Yu & Jin Xu (2009). Morality and Nature: The Essential Difference Between the Dao of Chinese Philosophy and Metaphysics in Western Philosophy. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):360-369.score: 229.8
    Both thinkings on Dao in Chinese philosophy and metaphysics in Western philosophy investigate things on a spiritual level that transcends experience, but there are incommensurable differences between them. The objective of “metaphysics” is ontological knowledge about nature from the perspective of epistemological “truth-pursuing”. Western metaphysics is thus a “metaphysics of nature”. Dao in Chinese philosophy, on the other hand, more often manifests itself in “good-pursuing” by means of the internal, experiential pursuit of moral stature and (...)
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  8. Karen R. Zwier (2012). The Status of Laws of Nature in the Philosophy of Leibniz. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:149-160.score: 228.6
    Is it possible to take the enterprise of physics seriously while also holding the belief that the world contains an order beyond the reach of that physics? Is it possible to simultaneously believe in objective laws of nature and in miracles? Is it possible to search for the truths of physics while also acknowledging the limitations of that search as it is carried out by limited human knowers? As a philosopher, as a Christian, and as a participant in the (...)
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  9. Bruce V. Foltz (2006). The Resurrection of Nature: Environmental Metaphysics in Sergei Bulgakov's Philosophy of Economy. Philosophy and Theology 18 (1):121-142.score: 226.8
    Although equal in power to other facets of the rich cultural ferment of modern Russia that have profoundly influenced Western civilization—such as painting, literature, drama, and politics—the authentic legacy of twentieth-century Russian philosophy has until recently been eclipsed by Soviet ideological dominance. Of the important philosophers drawing upon the characteristically Russian synthesis of Ancient Neoplatonism, German Idealism, and Byzantine spirituality, Sergei Bulgakov is outstanding, and his work has important implications for our contemporary thinking about the relationship between humanity (...)
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  10. Rico Vitz (forthcoming). The Nature and Functions of Sympathy in Hume's Philosophy. In Paul Russell (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of David Hume. Oxford University Press.score: 225.6
    My aim, in this chapter, is to outline the key details of this particularly interesting aspect of Hume's philosophical system. My presentation will be threefold. In the first section of the paper, I will elucidate the nature of sympathy, drawing upon some of the more recent ways in which Hume's commentators have attempted to resolve the interpretive puzzles Hume's works present. In the second section, I will explicate some of the functions sympathy has in Hume's philosophy, including not (...)
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  11. David Davies & Carl Matheson (eds.) (2008). Contemporary Readings in the Philosophy of Literature: An Analytic Approach. Broadview Press.score: 223.8
    What, if anything, distinguishes works of fiction such as Hamlet and Madame Bovary from biographies, news reports, or office bulletins? Is there a "right" way to interpret fiction? Should we link interpretation to the author's intention? Ought our moral unease with works that betray sadistic, sexist, or racist elements lower our judgments of their aesthetic worth? And what, when it comes down to it, is literature? The readings in this collection bring together some of the most important recent work (...)
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  12. Duck-joo Kwak (2011). Skepticism and Education: In Search of Another Filial Tie of Philosophy to Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):535-545.score: 216.6
    As a way of participating in the discussion on the disciplinary nature of philosophy of education, this article attempts to find another distinctive way of relating philosophy to education for the studies in philosophy of education. Recasting philosophical skepticism, which has been dismissed by Dewey and Rorty in their critiques of modern epistemology, it explores whether Cavell's romantic interpretation of it can allow us to conceive of skepticism as an exemplary practice of education, especially internal to (...)
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  13. Bruno Snell (1960/1982). The Discovery of the Mind: In Greek Philosophy and Literature. Dover.score: 216.0
    German classicist's monumental study of the origins of European thought in Greek literature and philosophy. Brilliant, widely influential. Includes "Homer's View of Man," "The Olympian Gods," "The Rise of the Individual in the Early Greek Lyric," "Pindar's Hymn to Zeus," "Myth and Reality in Greek Tragedy," and "Aristophanes and Aesthetic Criticism.".
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  14. Nancy Yousef (2004). Isolated Cases: The Anxieties of Autonomy in Enlightenment Philosophy and Romantic Literature. Cornell University Press.score: 216.0
    While individuals presented in central texts of the period are indeed often alone or separated from others, Yousef regards this isolation as a problem the texts attempt to illuminate, rather than a condition they construct as normative or ...
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  15. Ian Wylie (1989). Young Coleridge and the Philosophers of Nature. Oxford University Press.score: 212.6
    As a young man, Samuel Taylor Coleridge lived in an age of great social change. The political upheavals in America and France, the industrial revolution, and the explosion in humanity's knowledge of the natural order all had a profound effect on Coleridge and radical intellectuals like him. This book examines Coleridge's ideas on science and society in the critical years 1794 to 1796, setting them within the moral, political, and scientific context of the time. Wylie shows how the complex poem, (...)
     
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  16. Pamela Schirmeister (1999). Less Legible Meanings: Between Poetry and Philosophy in the Work of Emerson. Stanford University Press.score: 212.4
    Examining both why and how Emerson evades the ancient quarrel between literature and philosophy, this book entirely rethinks the nature of Emerson's radical individualism and its relation to the possibility of an ethics and a politics. The author argues that the quarrel between literature and philosophy never took place in America, and that instead traditional philosophical work staged itself here as a form of literary praxis and cultural therapeutics, epitomized in the work of Emerson. A (...)
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  17. Riccardo Chiaradonna & Franco Trabattoni (eds.) (2009). Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism: Proceedings of the European Science Foundation Exploratory Workshop (Il Ciocco, Castelvecchio Pascoli, June 22-24, 2006). [REVIEW] Brill.score: 211.8
    This volume makes an important contribution to the understanding of Greek Neoplatonism and its historical significance.
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  18. Walter R. Ott (2009). Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    Arguing for controversial readings of many of the canonical figures, the book also focuses on lesser-known writers such as Pierre-Sylvain Regis, Nicolas ...
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  19. Joseph Maria Marling (1934). The Order of Nature in the Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America.score: 207.0
     
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  20. Simon P. James (2009). The Presence of Nature: A Study in Phenomenology and Environmental Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 205.2
     
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  21. Jessy E. G. Jordan (2013). Thick Ethical Concepts in the Philosophy and Literature of Iris Murdoch. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (3):402-417.score: 204.0
    Although thick ethical concepts have been neglected in Murdochian scholarship, this article argues that they were central to the thought of Iris Murdoch. In the first section, the article provides a sustained account of thick ethical concepts in Murdoch's philosophy, demonstrating how these concepts align with and illuminate familiar aspects of her philosophical essays. The first section also explores the ways in which Murdoch's alternative account of moral concepts was at the heart of her overall attack on the noncognitivism (...)
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  22. Guido Kums, Hugo Roeffaers, Elisabeth Bekers & D. J. Conlon (eds.) (2004). Sans Everything: Essays on English Literature, Philosophy, and Culture in Honour of Guido Kums and Hugo Roeffaers. Acco.score: 204.0
     
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  23. Dalia Nassar (2014). Romantic Empiricism After the ‘End of Nature’: Contributions to Environmental Philosophy. In , The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 202.8
    Since Bill McKibben’s 1989 book, The End of Nature, it has become commonplace to pronounce the ‘end’ of that which, for many decades, we called nature. Although in many instances the reiterations of the end of nature do not agree with McKibben’s reasoning, they concur that nature is not a plausible or desirable concept for environmental thought or activism. Alongside this growing trend in environmental philosophy, a number of studies have recently appeared which reconsider the (...)
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  24. Arthur Schopenhauer (1992). On the Will in Nature: A Discussion of the Corroborations From the Empirical Sciences That the Author's Philosophy has Received Since its First Appearance. Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by St. Martin's Press.score: 201.6
     
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  25. Howard Rollin Patch (1922/1978). The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Medieval Philosophy and Literature. R. West.score: 200.4
     
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  26. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2005). The Loss of Nature in Axel Honneth's Social Philosophy. Rereading Mead with Merleau-Ponty. Critical Horizons 6 (1):153-181.score: 199.2
    This paper analyses the model of interaction at the heart of Axel Honneth's social philosophy. It argues that interaction in his mature ethics of recognition has been reduced to intercourse between human persons and that the role of nature is now missing from it. The ethics of recognition takes into account neither the material dimensions of individual and social action, nor the normative meaning of non-human persons and natural environments. The loss of nature in the mature ethics (...)
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  27. Elaine Miller (2002). The Vegetative Soul: From Philosophy of Nature to Subjectivity in the Feminine. State University of New York Press.score: 199.2
    Rethinks the soul in plant-like terms rather than animal, drawing from nineteenth-century philosophy of nature.
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  28. Charles Taliaferro & Jil Evans (eds.) (2011). Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, and Religion: A New Book of Nature. OUP Oxford.score: 197.0
    Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, and Religion: A New Book of Nature brings together new essays addressing the role of images and imagination recruited in the perennial debates surrounding nature, mind, and God. -/- The debate between "new atheists" and religious apologists today is often hostile. This book sets a new tone by locating the debate between theism and naturalism (most "new atheists" are self-described "naturalists") in the broader context of reflection on imagination and aesthetics. The eleven (...)
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  29. Jasper Hopkins, Theological Language and the Nature of Man in Jean-Paul Sartre's Philosophy.score: 196.8
    There is no more prominent atheist today than Jean-Paul Sartre. Yet serious students of Sartre’s philosophy are struck by his unabashed use of theological idiom. This use is so extensive that Professor Hazel Barnes in her translator’s introduction to Being and Nothingness comments: Many people who consider themselves religious could quite comfortably accept Sartre’s philosophy if he did not embarrass them by making his pronouncement, “ There is no God,” quite so specific.1 The present chapter will explore the (...)
     
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  30. Daniel E. Shannon (2013). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature of 1805-6; Its Relation to the Phenomenology of Spirit. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):101-132.score: 196.6
    800x600 Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (1807) was supposed to be the introduction and first part of the Jena System III, and as such it was to introduce us to the other parts of the project. Most commentators on Hegel’s Phenomenology , however, do not consider how the Phenomenology relates the other parts, and some discount Hegel understanding and commitment to the natural philosophy of his day. This paper attempts to make the connection between the Phenomenology and the Natural (...) of 1805-06 explicit; to show where and how the connections are made; to identify how Hegel uses the natural sciences of his day in creating his system. By showing this I hope to prove that his concept of Spirit is born within his natural philosophy. It is part of his cosmology. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}. (shrink)
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  31. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 196.2
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue (...)
     
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  32. Carlos Sanchez (2007). The Nature of Belief and the Method of Its Justification in Husserl's Philosophy. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2).score: 195.0
    The present paper attempts to accomplish the following: (1) to clarify and critically discuss the phenomenology of “belief” as we find it in Husserl’s Ideas Pertaining to a Pure Phenomenology and to a Phenomenological Philosophy, First Book (1913) (henceforward, Ideas I); (2) to clarify and critically discuss the manner in which the phenomenological method treats beliefs; (3) to clarify and critically discuss the manner of belief justification as described by the phenomenological method; and (4) to argue that, just as (...)
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  33. Marije Martijn (2010). Proclus on the Order of Philosophy of Nature. Synthese 174 (2):205 - 223.score: 193.8
    In this paper I show that Proclus is an adherent of the Classical Model of Science as set out elsewhere in this issue (de Jong and Betti 2008), and that he adjusts certain conditions of the Model to his Neoplatonic epistemology and metaphysics. In order to show this, I develop a case study concerning philosophy of nature, which, despite its unstable subject matter, Proclus considers to be a science. To give this science a firm foundation Proclus distills from (...)
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  34. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1970/2004). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature. Oxford,Clarendon Press.score: 193.8
    This is a much-needed reissue of the standard English translation of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature, originally published in 1970. The Philosophy of Nature is the second part of Hegel's Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, all of which is now available in English from OUP (Part I being his Logic, Part III being his Philosophy of Mind). Hegel's aim in this work is to interpret the varied phenomena of Nature from the standpoint of a dialectical (...)
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  35. Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling (1988). Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature as Introduction to the Study of This Science, 1797. Cambridge University Press.score: 193.8
    This is the first English translation of Schelling's Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature (first published in 1797 and revised in 1803), one of the most significant works in the German tradition of philosophy of nature and early nineteenth-century philosophy of science. It stands in opposition to the Newtonian picture of matter as constituted by inert, impenetrable particles, and argues instead for matter as an equilibrium of active forces that engage in dynamic polar opposition to (...)
     
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  36. Richard Thomas Eldridge (2001). The Persistence of Romanticism: Essays in Philosophy and Literature. Cambridge University Press.score: 193.2
    These challenging essays defend Romanticism against its critics. They argue that Romantic thought, interpreted as the pursuit of freedom in concrete contexts, remains a central and exemplary form of both artistic work and philosophical understanding. Marshalling a wide range of texts from literature, philosophy and criticism, Richard Eldridge traces the central themes and stylistic features of Romantic thinking in the work of Kant, Hölderlin, Wordsworth, Hardy, Wittgenstein, Cavell and Updike. Through his analysis he shows that Romanticism is neither (...)
     
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  37. Zailin Zhang (2009). Theories of Family in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):343-359.score: 192.6
    Unlike traditional Western philosophy, which places no special emphasis on the importance of family structure, traditional Chinese philosophy represented by Confucianism is a set of theories that give family a primary position. With family as the foundation, a complete framework of “human body → two genders → family and clan” is formed. Therefore, family in Chinese philosophy is existent, gender-interactive and diachronic. It should also be noted that family also plays a fundamental role in Chinese theories on (...)
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  38. Tao Liang (2009). Mencius and the Tradition of Articulating Human Nature in Terms of Growth. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):180-197.score: 192.6
    This article analyses the tradition of “articulating xing in terms of sheng ” and related other expressions, and also examines the debate between Mencius and Gaozi concerning “ xing is known by sheng .” It claims that while Mencius’ “human nature is good” discourse is influenced by the interpretive tradition of “articulating xing in terms of sheng ”, Mencius also transcends and develops this tradition. Therefore it is only when Mencius’ views about the goodness of human nature are (...)
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  39. Liang Tao & Andrew Lambert (2009). Mencius and the Tradition of Articulating Human Nature in Terms of Growth. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):180 - 197.score: 192.6
    This article analyses the tradition of "articulating xing in terms of sheng" and related other expressions, and also examines the debate between Mencius and Gaozi concerning "xing is known by sheng" It claims that while Mencius' "human nature is good" discourse is influenced by the interpretive tradition of "articulating xing in terms of sheng", Mencius also transcends and develops this tradition. Therefore it is only when Mencius' views about the goodness of human nature are understood in the context (...)
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  40. Isaac Newton (1953/2005). Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings. Dover Publications.score: 192.0
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
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  41. Nancy Stepan (2001). Picturing Tropical Nature. Cornell University Press.score: 190.8
    From the earliest photographic attempts to represent tropical hybrid races to depictions of disease in new tropical medicines, Picturing Tropical Nature offers ...
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  42. Pauline Kleingeld (2001). Nature or Providence? On the Theoretical and Moral Importance of Kant’s Philosophy of History. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 75 (2):201-219.score: 190.2
    Kant’s use of the terms ‘Nature’ and ‘Providence’ in his essays on history has long puzzled commentators. Kant personifies Nature and Providence in a curious way, by speaking of them as “deciding” to give humankind certain predispositions, “wanting” these to be developed, and “knowing” what is best for humans Moreover, he leaves the relationship between the two terms unclear. In this essay, I argue that Kant’s use of ‘Nature’ and ‘Providence’ can be clarified and explained. Moreover, I (...)
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  43. Zhang Pengwei, Guo Qiyong & Wang Bei (2008). New Insight Into Mencius' Theory of the Original Goodness in Human Nature. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):27 - 38.score: 190.2
    In Mencius' theory of the original goodness in human nature, fate is the original source of xing (nature). Heart is the appearance of nature. There are two aspects to nature and heart: ti (form) and yong (function). From the perspective of form, nature is liangzhi (the goodness in conscience) and liangneng (the inborn ability to be good) in human beings and heart is human's conscience and original heart. From the perspective of function, nature is (...)
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  44. A. P. Martinich (2011). Reason and Reciprocity in Hobbes's Political Philosophy: On Sharon Lloyd's: Morality in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes. Hobbes Studies 23 (2):158-169.score: 190.2
    Lloyd's book, Morality in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes , correctly stresses the deductive element in Hobbes's proofs of the laws of nature. She believes that “the principle of reciprocity” is the key to these proofs. This principle is effective in getting ego-centric people to recognize moral laws and their moral obligations. However, it is not, I argue, the basic principle Hobbes uses to derive the laws of nature, from definitions. The principle of reason, which dictates that (...)
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  45. Bence Nanay (2013). From Philosophy of Science to Philosophy of Literature (and Back) Via Philosophy of Mind. Philip Kitcher’s Philosophical Pendulum. Theoria (77):257-264.score: 190.2
    A recent focus of Philip Kitcher’s research has been, somewhat surprisingly in the light of his earlier work, the philosophical analyses of literary works and operas. Some may see a discontinuity in Kitcher’s oeuvre in this respect – it may be difficult to see how his earlier contributions to philosophy of science relate to this much less mainstream approach to philosophy. The aim of this paper is to show that there is no such discontinuity: Kitcher’s contributions to the (...)
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  46. Jean-Gabriel Ganascia (2010). Epistemology of AI Revisited in the Light of the Philosophy of Information. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (1-2):57-73.score: 190.2
    Artificial intelligence has often been seen as an attempt to reduce the natural mind to informational processes and, consequently, to naturalize philosophy. The many criticisms that were addressed to the so-called “old-fashioned AI” do not concern this attempt itself, but the methods it used, especially the reduction of the mind to a symbolic level of abstraction, which has often appeared to be inadequate to capture the richness of our mental activity. As a consequence, there were many efforts to evacuate (...)
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  47. Naly Thaler (2011). Traces of Good in Plotinus's Philosophy of Nature: Ennead VI.7.1-141. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2).score: 188.4
    Ennead VI.7, the thirty-eighth treatise in order of composition, opens with a sustained attack on the idea that the form and function of various animal organs are the result of divine forethought and deliberation. In the first three chapters of the treatise, Plotinus argues that no formulation of the notion of deliberation can be made consistent with the facts about the nature of the intelligible2 and its priority over the physical world. As has been noted in the past,3 Plotinus's (...)
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  48. Mark Bedau (ed.) (2010). The Nature of Life: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives From Philosophy and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 187.8
    Bringing together the latest scientific advances and some of the most enduring subtle philosophical puzzles and problems, this book collects original historical and contemporary sources to explore the wide range of issues surrounding the nature of life. Selections ranging from Aristotle and Descartes to Sagan and Dawkins are organised around four broad themes covering classical discussions of life, the origins and extent of natural life, contemporary artificial life creations and the definition and meaning of 'life' in its most general (...)
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  49. Mark Bedau & Carol Cleland (eds.) (2010). The Nature of Life: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives From Philosophy and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 187.8
    Bringing together the latest scientific advances and some of the most enduring subtle philosophical puzzles and problems, this book collects original historical and contemporary sources to explore the wide range of issues surrounding the nature of life. Selections ranging from Aristotle and Descartes to Sagan and Dawkins are organised around four broad themes covering classical discussions of life, the origins and extent of natural life, contemporary artificial life creations and the definition and meaning of 'life' in its most general (...)
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  50. Catherine Osborne (2007/2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.score: 187.8
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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