Search results for 'Philosophy of physics' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Meinard Kuhlmann & Wolfgang Pietsch (2012). What Is and Why Do We Need Philosophy of Physics? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (2):209-214.score: 762.0
    Philosophy of physics is a small but thriving research field situated at the intersection between the natural sciences and the humanities. However, what exactly distinguishes philosophy of physics from physics is rarely made explicit in much depth. We provide a detailed analysis in the form of eleven theses, delineating both the nature of the questions asked in philosophy of physics and the methodology with which they are addressed.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. A. Quale (2008). The Issue of Reductionism. A Radical Constructivist Approach to the Philosophy of Physics. Constructivist Foundations 4 (1):43-49.score: 720.0
    Purpose: To examine the role of reductionism in the theoretical development of modern physics -- more specifically, in the quest for a complete unification of physical theory -- from the perspective of radical constructivism (RC). Approach: Some central features of the impact of RC on philosophy of physics are pointed out: its position of scientific relativism, with important implications for the validation of scientific propositions; and the notion of sharing constructed knowledge among individual knowers and its consequences (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Thomas Ryckman (2012). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Physics? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):496-512.score: 654.0
    Abstract Naturalized metaphysics remains a default presupposition of much contemporary philosophy of physics. As metaphysics is supposed to be about the general structure of reality, so a naturalized metaphysics draws upon our best physical theories: Assuming the truth of such a theory, it attempts to answer the “foundational question par excellence “, “how could the world possibly be the way this theory says it is?“ It is argued that attention to historical detail in the development and formulation of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John Honner (1987). The Description of Nature: Niels Bohr and the Philosophy of Quantum Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 645.0
    Niels Bohr, founding father of modern atomic physics and quantum theory, was as original a philosopher as he was a physicist. This study explores several dimensions of Bohr's vision: the formulation of quantum theory and the problems associated with its interpretation, the notions of complementarity and correspondence, the debates with Einstein about objectivity and realism, and his sense of the infinite harmony of nature. Honner focuses on Bohr's epistemological lesson, the conviction that all our description of nature is dependent (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Peter Kosso (1998). Appearance and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 624.0
    Appearance and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics addresses quantum mechanics and relativity and their philosophical implications, focusing on whether these theories of modern physics can help us know nature as it really is, or only as it appears to us. The author clearly explains the foundational concepts and principles of both quantum mechanics and relativity and then uses them to argue that we can know more than mere appearances, and that we can know to (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Vincent Edward Smith (1961). The Philosophy of Physics. Jamaica, N.Y.,St. John's University Press.score: 624.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Riccardo Chiaradonna & Franco Trabattoni (eds.) (2009). Physics and Philosophy of Nature in Greek Neoplatonism: Proceedings of the European Science Foundation Exploratory Workshop (Il Ciocco, Castelvecchio Pascoli, June 22-24, 2006). [REVIEW] Brill.score: 618.0
    This volume makes an important contribution to the understanding of Greek Neoplatonism and its historical significance.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman (eds.) (2007). Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier.score: 612.0
    The ambition of this volume is twofold: to provide a comprehensive overview of the field and to serve as an indispensable reference work for anyone who wants to work in it. For example, any philosopher who hopes to make a contribution to the topic of the classical-quantum correspondence will have to begin by consulting Klaas Landsman’s chapter. The organization of this volume, as well as the choice of topics, is based on the conviction that the important problems in the (...) of physics arise from studying the foundations of the fundamental theories of physics. It follows that there is no sharp line to be drawn between philosophy of physics and physics itself. Some of the best work in the philosophy of physics is being done by physicists, as witnessed by the fact that several of the contributors to the volume are theoretical physicists: viz., Ellis, Emch, Harvey, Landsman, Rovelli, ‘t Hooft, the last of whom is a Nobel laureate. Key features - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences that have grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Roberto Torretti (1999). The Philosophy of Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 612.0
    A magisterial study of the philosophy of physics that both introduces the subject to the non-specialist and contains many original and important contributions for professionals in the area. Modern physics was born as a part of philosophy and has retained to this day a properly philosophical concern for the clarity and coherence of ideas. Any introduction to the philosophy of physics must therefore focus on the conceptual development of physics itself. This book pursues (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Lawrence Sklar (1992). Philosophy of Physics. Westview Press.score: 612.0
    The study of the physical world had its origins in philosophy, and, two-and-one-half millennia later, the scientific advances of the twentieth century are bringing the two fields closer together again. So argues Lawrence Sklar in this brilliant new text on the philosophy of physics.Aimed at students of both disciplines, Philosophy of Physics is a broad overview of the problems of contemporary philosophy of physics that readers of all levels of sophistication should find accessible (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Earman & Jeremy Butterfield (eds.) (2007). Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier.score: 612.0
    The ambition of this volume is twofold: to provide a comprehensive overview of the field and to serve as an indispensable reference work for anyone who wants to work in it. For example, any philosopher who hopes to make a contribution to the topic of the classical-quantum correspondence will have to begin by consulting Klaas Landsman’s chapter. The organization of this volume, as well as the choice of topics, is based on the conviction that the important problems in the (...) of physics arise from studying the foundations of the fundamental theories of physics. It follows that there is no sharp line to be drawn between philosophy of physics and physics itself. Some of the best work in the philosophy of physics is being done by physicists, as witnessed by the fact that several of the contributors to the volume are theoretical physicists: viz., Ellis, Emch, Harvey, Landsman, Rovelli, ‘t Hooft, the last of whom is a Nobel laureate. Key features - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences that have grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Dugald Murdoch (1987). Niels Bohr's Philosophy of Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 603.0
    Murdoch describes the historical background of the physics from which Bohr's ideas grew; he traces the origins of his idea of complementarity and discusses its meaning and significance. Special emphasis is placed on the contrasting views of Einstein, and the great debate between Bohr and Einstein is thoroughly examined. Bohr's philosophy is revealed as being much more subtle, and more interesting than is generally acknowledged.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Michael Esfeld (1999). Holism in Cartesianism and in Today's Philosophy of Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 30 (1):17-36.score: 582.0
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more balanced judgement than the widespread impression that the changes which are called for in today's philosophy of physics and which centre around the concept of holism amount to a rupture with the framework of Cartesian philosophy of physics. I argue that this framework includes a sort of holism: As a result of the identification of matter with space, any physical property can be instantiated only if (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Max Jammer (1991). Sir Karl Popper and His Philosophy of Physics. Foundations of Physics 21 (12):1357-1368.score: 579.0
    The eminent mathematical physicist Sir Hermann Bondi once said: “There is no more to science than its method, and there is no more to its method than Popper has said.” Indeed, many regard Sir Karl Raimund Popper the greatest philosopher of science in our generation. Much of what Popper “has said” refers to physics, but physicists, generally speaking, have little knowledge of what he has said. True, Popper's philosophy of science and, in particular, his realistic interpretation of quantum (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Leibniz's Philosophy of Physics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 576.0
    entry for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) This entry will attempt to provide a broad overview of the central themes of Leibniz’s philosophy of physics, as well as an introduction to some of the principal arguments and argumentative strategies he used to defend his positions. It tentatively includes sections entitled, The Historical Development of Leibniz’s Physics, Leibniz on Matter, Leibniz’s Dynamics, Leibniz on the Laws of Motion, Leibniz on Space and Time. A bibliography arranged by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Dean Rickles (ed.) (2008). The Ashgate Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Physics. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..score: 564.0
    "Introducing the reader to the very latest developments in the philosophical foundations of physics, this book covers advanced material at a level suitable for ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Dudley Shapere (1988). Modern Physics and the Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:201 - 210.score: 564.0
    This paper examines some sources of the concepts of existence, explanation, and force (together with some related ideas) in ancient thought, and shows how those ideas have been altered in fundamental ways in modem physics. Some lessons for the philosophy of science, in particular implications for its methodology, are considered.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. K. V. Laurikainen (1990). Quantum Physics, Philosophy, and the Image of God: Insights From Wolfgang Pauli. Zygon 25 (4):391-404.score: 558.0
    Nobel Laureate in physics Wolfgang Pauli studied philosophy and the history of ideas intensively, especially in his later years, to form an accurate ontology vis-à-vis quantum theory. Pauli's close contacts with the Swiss psychiatrist C.G. Jung gave him special qualifications for also understanding the basic problems of empirical knowledge. After Pauli's sudden death in 1958, this work was maintained mainly in his posthumously published correspondence, which so far extends only to 1939. Because Pauli's view differs essentially from the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Bruce Silver (1977). Reply to Professor Mirarchi's Force and Absolute Motion in Berkeley's Philosophy of Physics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38.score: 549.0
    Professor l a mirarchi argues, In his "force and absolute motion in berkeley's philosophy of physics" (_journal of the history of ideas, Volume 38, Pages 705-713), That I have misunderstood berkeley's treatment of inertial motion. I contend, Despite professor mirarchi's criticism, That while berkeley accepts the newtonian principle of inertia, He cannot accommodate it into his own radically contingent picture of the universe.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman, Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics: Volume 2 of the North-Holland Series, the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science.score: 540.0
    This is the editors' introduction to a new anthology of commissioned articles covering the various branches of philosophy of physics. We introduce the articles in terms of the three pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory and thermal physics. We end by discussing the present state, and future prospects, of fundamental physics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Thomas Ryckman (2005). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915-1925. Oxford University Press.score: 540.0
    Universally recognized as bringing about a revolutionary transformation of the notions of space, time, and motion in physics, Einstein's theory of gravitation, known as "general relativity," was also a defining event for 20th century philosophy of science. During the decisive first ten years of the theory's existence, two main tendencies dominated its philosophical reception. This book is an extended argument that the path actually taken, which became logical empiricist philosophy of science, greatly contributed to the current impasse (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Marc Lange (2002). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics. Blackwell.score: 540.0
    This book combines physics, history, and philosophy in a radical new approach to introducing the philosophy of physics.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Henrik Zinkernagel (2011). Some Trends in the Philosophy of Physics. Theoria 26 (2):215-241.score: 540.0
    A short review of some recent developments in the philosophy of physics is presented. I focus on themes which illustrate relations and points of common interest between philosophy of physics and three of its ‘neighboring’ fields: Physics, metaphysics and general philosophy of science. The main examples discussed inthese three ‘border areas’ are (i) decoherence and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; (ii) time in physics and metaphysics; and (iii) methodological issues surrounding the multiverse idea (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Dean Rickles (2008). Advancing the Philosophy of Physics. In , The Ashgate Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Physics. Ashgate Pub. Ltd.. 4--15.score: 540.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jeremy Butterfield, The Philosophy of Physics.score: 537.0
    This is an excellent book, by a very distinguished historian and philosopher of physics. Roberto Torretti is principally known to historians and philosophers of physics through his previous books, Philosophy of Geometry from Riemann to Poincaré (1978), Relativity and Geometry (1983), and Creative Understanding: Philosophical Reflections on Physics (1990). As the first two titles suggest, his forte is the history and philosophy of geometry and spacetime physics, especially from the nineteenth century onwards. These two (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Karim J. Gherab-Martin (2013). From Structuralism to Neutral Monism in Arthur S. Eddington's Philosophy of Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 44 (4):500-512.score: 537.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Elaine Maria Paiva de Andrade, Jean Faber & Luiz Pinguelli Rosa (2013). A Spontaneous Physics Philosophy on the Concept of Ether Throughout the History of Science: Birth, Death and Revival. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (3):559-577.score: 534.0
    In the course of the history of science, some concepts have forged theoretical foundations, constituting paradigms that hold sway for substantial periods of time. Research on the history of explanations of the action of one body on another is a testament to the periodic revival of one theory in particular, namely, the theory of ether. Even after the foundation of modern Physics, the notion of ether has directly and indirectly withstood the test of time. Through a spontaneous physics (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Eleanor Knox (2011). The Ashgate Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Physics. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):199 - 202.score: 534.0
    International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Volume 25, Issue 2, Page 199-202, June 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Barry Loewer, The Philosophy of Physics.score: 531.0
    It is not so much a distinct and established academic discipline as it is a sort of boundary, a sort of frontier, across which theoretical physics and modern western philosophy have been interrogating and informing and unsettling one another, for something on the order of four hundred years now, about the character of matter, the nature of space and time, the question of determinism, meaning of chance, the possibility of knowledge, and much else besides.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Mario Augusto Bunge (1973). Philosophy of Physics. Boston,Reidel.score: 531.0
    PHILOSOPHY: BEACON OR TRAP* There was a time when everyone expected almost everything from philosophy. It was the time when philosophers drew confidently ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Emily R. Grosholz (1986). A Case Study in the Application of Mathematics to Physics: Descartes' Principles of Philosophy, Part II. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:116 - 124.score: 528.0
    The question of how and why mathematics can be applied to physical reality should be approached through the history of science, as a series of case studies which may reveal both generalizable patterns and salient differences in the grounds and nature of that application from era to era. The present examination of Descartes' Principles of Philosophy Part II, reveals a deep ambiguity in the relation of Euclidean geometry to res extensa, and a tension between geometrical form and 'common motion (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Décio Krause & Jonas Rafael Becker Arenhart (2013). Perspectivism in Philosophy of Science: A Case-Study in Quantum Physics. Scientiae Studia 11 (1):159-183.score: 522.0
    ENGLISH: In this article we present a particular view of the development of scientific theories which (following Ortega y Gasset), we term "perspectivism". Making use of this view, we discuss how we can accommodate distinct and apparently incompatible descriptions of a supposed reality under investigation. We distinguish between a "reality" (R) and its "empirical description", (Re). Acknowledging that we can have diverse empirical descriptions of the same reality, we discuss the particular case in which the view is applied to current (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jeffrey Koperski (2015). The Physics of Theism: God, Physics, and the Philosophy of Science. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 522.0
    Theologians and philosophers of religion are increasingly interested in physics. From the fine-tuning of universal constants to quantum mechanics, relativity, and cosmology, physics is a surprisingly common subject where religion is involved. Bridging the gap between issues in religion and those in physics can be quite difficult, however. Fortunately, the philosophy of science provides a middle ground between the two disciplines. In this book, a philosopher of science provides a critical analysis of the ways in which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Laurence Bright (1960). Whitehead's Philosophy of Physics. New York, Sheed and Ward.score: 522.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John F. Cyranski (1985). Theory Vs. Experiment: A Holistic Philosophy of Physics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 15 (7):753-771.score: 512.0
    We present a holistic description of physical systems and how they relate to observations. The “theory” is established (geometrically) as a “classical random field theory.” The basic system variables are related to Lie group generators: the conjugate variables define observer parameters. The dichotomy between system and observer leads to acommunication channel relationship. The distortion measure on the channel distinguishes “classical” from “quantum” theories. The experiment is defined in terms that accommodate precision and unreliability. Information theory methods permit stochastic inference (this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1958). The Philosophy of Physical Science. [Ann Arbor]University of Michigan Press.score: 509.0
    The lectures have afforded me an opportunity of developing more fully than in my earlier books the principles of philosophic thought associated with the modern advances of physical science. It is often said that there is no "philosophy of ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Dumitru Daba (2009). The Philosophy of Nature and the Drama of Modern Physics. Editura Politehnica.score: 507.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Adolf Grünbaum & Aleksandar Jokić (eds.) (2009). Philosophy of Religion, Physics, and Psychology: Essays in Honor of Adolf Grünbaum. Prometheus Books.score: 507.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Henry Margenau (1950/1977). The Nature of Physical Reality: A Philosophy of Modern Physics. Ox Bow Press.score: 507.0
  40. Joseph Mudry (1958). Philosophy of Atomic Physics. New York, Philosophical Library.score: 507.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Hans Reichenbach (1948). Philosophy and Physics: Faculty Research Lecture, University of California, Los Angeles, Delivered March 25, 1946. University of California Press.score: 507.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Steven E. Landsburg (2009). The Big Questions: Tackling the Problems of Philosophy with Ideas From Mathematics, Economics, and Physics. Free Press.score: 504.0
    The beginning of the journey -- What this book is about : using ideas from mathematics, economics, and physics to tackle the big questions in philosophy : what is real? what can we know? what is the difference between right and wrong? and how should we live? -- Reality and unreality -- On what there is -- Why is there something instead of nothing? the best answer I have : mathematics exists because it must and everything else exists (...)
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Tim Maudlin (2012). Philosophy of Physics. Princeton Up.score: 498.0
    An ironworker may not give a fig about the nature of heat, and the philosopher of physics may care equally little about the exact time it takes for the iron to cool down. A practicing physicist will typically care about both but may focus more on  ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Katherine Brading, Physically Locating the Present: A Case of Reading Physics as a Contribution to Philosophy.score: 495.0
    In this paper I argue that reading history of physics as a contribution to history of philosophy is important for contemporary philosophy of physics. My argument centers around a particular case: special relativity versus presentism. By means of resources drawn from reading aspects of Newton's work as contributions to philosophy, I argue that there is in physics an alternative way to approach what we mean by "present" such that (without adding any preferred foliation or (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Jonathan Duquette & K. Ramasubramanian (2010). Is Space Created? Reflections on Śaṇkara's Philosophy and Philosophy of Physics. Philosophy East and West 60 (4):517-533.score: 495.0
    From Antiquity to the present day, the concept of space has engaged the attention of philosophers and scientists of every civilization. Space as a subject of philosophical inquiry appears quite early in Greek philosophy, especially in the works of natural philosophers such as Philolaus, Plato, and Aristotle.1 For about two thousand years, Aristotle's philosophy constituted the framework from which successive generations of Western philosophers and scientists attempted to reason about space. This view was shaken, however, with the publication (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. E. Baggott (2004). Beyond Measure: Modern Physics, Philosophy, and the Meaning of Quantum Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 495.0
    Quantum theory is one the most important and successful theories of modern physical science. It has been estimated that its principles form the basis for about 30 per cent of the world's manufacturing economy. This is all the more remarkable because quantum theory is a theory that nobody understands. The meaning of Quantum Theory introduces science students to the theory's fundamental conceptual and philosophical problems, and the basis of its non-understandability. It does this with the barest minimum of jargon and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Mauro Dorato (2010). On Various Senses of “Conventional” and Their Interrelation in the Philosophy of Physics: Simultaneity as a Case Study. In Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann, Wenceslao Gonzalez, Marcel Weber, Dennis Dieks & Friedrich Stadler (eds.), The Present Situation in the Philosophy of Science. Springer. 335--349.score: 492.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Huw Price (1991). The Philosophy of Physics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (1):111-144.score: 492.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Lawrence Sklar (2001). Book Review: The Philosophy of Physics. By Roberto Torretti. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 1999, Xvi + 512 Pp., $23.95 (Softcover). [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 31 (5):867-868.score: 492.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. A. Bartels, H. Lyre & M. Esfeld (2004). Holism in the Philosophy of Physics: An Introduction. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (4):597-599.score: 492.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000