Search results for 'Philosophy, Ancient, in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Catherine Osborne (2007/2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.score: 270.0
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  2. Frederick E. Brenk (1998). Relighting the Souls: Studies in Plutarch, in Greek Literature, Religion, and Philosophy, and in the New Testament Background. Franz Steiner Verlag.score: 184.5
    This collection contains many stimulating and important articles from the Plutarch renaissance, especially on the interaction between divine and human worlds, ...
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  3. Bruno Snell (1960/1982). The Discovery of the Mind: In Greek Philosophy and Literature. Dover.score: 166.5
    German classicist's monumental study of the origins of European thought in Greek literature and philosophy. Brilliant, widely influential. Includes "Homer's View of Man," "The Olympian Gods," "The Rise of the Individual in the Early Greek Lyric," "Pindar's Hymn to Zeus," "Myth and Reality in Greek Tragedy," and "Aristophanes and Aesthetic Criticism.".
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  4. Marina Berzins McCoy (2013). Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy. Oup Oxford.score: 151.5
    McCoy examines how Greek epic, tragedy, and philosophy offer important insights into the nature of human vulnerability, especially how Greek thought extols the recognition and proper acceptance of vulnerability. Beginning with the literary works of Homer and Sophocles, she also expands her analysis to the philosophical works of Plato and Aristotle.
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  5. Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
    Lucretius' didactic poem De rerum natura ('On the Nature of Things') is an impassioned and visionary presentation of the materialist philosophy of Epicurus, and one of the most powerful poetic texts of antiquity. After its rediscovery in 1417 it became a controversial and seminal work in successive phases of literary history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. In this Cambridge Companion experts in the history of literature, philosophy and science discuss the poem in its ancient contexts and in (...)
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  6. John L. Lepage (2012). The Revival of Antique Philosophy in the Renaissance. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 150.0
    This book examines the revival of antique philosophy in the Renaissance as a literary preoccupation informed by wit.
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  7. Ryan Balot (2006). Bakewell (G.W.), Sickinger (J.P.) (Edd.) Gestures. Essays in Ancient History, Literature, and Philosophy Presented to Alan L. Boegehold on the Occasion of His Retirement and His Seventy-Fifth Birthday . Pp. Xii + 363, Ills. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 1-84217-086-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):235-.score: 148.5
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  8. Roger S. Bagnall & Peter Darow (2004). Allen, Pauline, and Bronwen Neil, Trans. And Eds. Maximus the Confessor and His Companions: Documents From Exile. Oxford Early Christian Texts. Oxford: Ox-Ford University Press, 2002. Xvi+ 210 Pp. 2 Maps. Cloth, $70. Bakewell, Geoffrey W., and James P. Sickinger, Eds. Gestures: Essays in Ancient History, Literature, and Philosophy Presented to Alan L. Boegehold on the Occa. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 125:157-162.score: 148.5
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  9. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.score: 147.0
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological and (...)
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  10. D. Clough (2009). Book Review: Catherine Osborne, Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). Xiii + 262 Pp. 42.00 (Hb), ISBN 978--0--19--928206--. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):246-250.score: 147.0
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  11. Alice Crary (2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature – by Catherine Osborne. Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):191-197.score: 144.0
  12. Zailin Zhang (2009). Theories of Family in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):343-359.score: 144.0
    Unlike traditional Western philosophy, which places no special emphasis on the importance of family structure, traditional Chinese philosophy represented by Confucianism is a set of theories that give family a primary position. With family as the foundation, a complete framework of “human body → two genders → family and clan” is formed. Therefore, family in Chinese philosophy is existent, gender-interactive and diachronic. It should also be noted that family also plays a fundamental role in Chinese theories on cosmology, religion, and (...)
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  13. Ningzhong Shi (2010). Proposition, Definition and Inference in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):414-431.score: 144.0
    This article attempts to explore ancient Chinese philosophical thought by analyzing how pioneering Chinese thinkers made judgments and inferences, and compares it to ancient Greek philosophy. It first addresses the starting-point and the object of cognition in Chinese ancient philosophy, then analyses how early thinkers construed definition and proposition, and finally discusses how they made inferences on the basis of definition and proposition. It points out that categorization is an important methodology in ancient Chinese philosophy, and that rectification of names (...)
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  14. Douglas Cairns (2007). Philosophy (D.) Konstan The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks. Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature. (Robson Classical Lectures). U. Of Toronto P., 2006. Pp. Xvi + 422. £55. 9780802091031. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:248-.score: 144.0
  15. John Dillon (2008). Osborne (C.) Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers. Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Pp. Xiv + 262. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Cased, £40. ISBN: 978-0-19-928206-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01):76-78.score: 144.0
  16. Tania L. Gergel (2004). Plato as Literature (J.) Annas and (C.) Rowe Eds. New Perspectives on Plato, Modern and Ancient. Harvard UP, 2002. Pp. Xii + 270. £33.50. 0674010183. (A.) Michelini Ed. Plato as Author. The Rhetoric of Philosophy. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003. Pp. Vii + 359. €40/$50. 9004128786. (S.) Blondell The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Cambridge UP, 2002. Pp. Xi + 452. £55/$75. 0521793009. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:174-178.score: 144.0
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  17. Susan Lape (2008). Philosophy (C.) Osborne Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers. Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Pp. Xi + 262. £40. 9780199282067. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:275-.score: 144.0
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  18. William O. Stephens (2008). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Social Theory and Practice 34 (1):139-145.score: 144.0
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  19. Pamela Schirmeister (1999). Less Legible Meanings: Between Poetry and Philosophy in the Work of Emerson. Stanford University Press.score: 141.0
    Examining both why and how Emerson evades the ancient quarrel between literature and philosophy, this book entirely rethinks the nature of Emerson's radical individualism and its relation to the possibility of an ethics and a politics. The author argues that the quarrel between literature and philosophy never took place in America, and that instead traditional philosophical work staged itself here as a form of literary praxis and cultural therapeutics, epitomized in the work of Emerson. A revisionary study of (...)
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  20. Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.score: 138.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  21. Richard Kannicht (1988). The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry: Aspects of the Greek Conception of Literature. University of Canterbury.score: 138.0
     
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  22. Duncan F. Kennedy (2013). Antiquity and the Meanings of Time: A Philosophy of Ancient and Modern Literature. I.B. Tauris.score: 138.0
    Does Augustine put his finger on time? -- Time for history -- Determination -- Self-determination -- Time, knowledge and truth.
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  23. Wolfgang Reisinger (1996). Ancient Myth and Philosophy in Peter Russell's Agamemnon in Hades. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 138.0
     
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  24. Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 135.0
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement and Origen (...)
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  25. Jonathan Barnes (2011). Method and Metaphysics: Essays in Ancient Philosophy I. Oxford University Press.score: 135.0
    Ancient philosophers -- The history of philosophy -- Philosophy within quotation marks? -- Anglophone attitudes -- Brentano's Aristotle -- Heidegger in the cave -- 'There was an old person from Tyre' -- The Presocratics in context -- Argument in ancient philosophy -- Philosophy and dialectic -- Aristotle and the methods of ethics -- Metacommentary -- An introduction to Aspasius -- Parmenides and the Eleatic One -- Reason and necessity in Leucippus -- Plato's cyclical argument -- Death and the philosopher -- (...)
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  26. Jyl Gentzler (ed.) (1998). Method in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 135.0
    Method in Ancient Philosophy brings together fifteen new, specially written essays by leading scholars on a broad subject of central importance. The ancient Greeks recognized that different forms of human activity are guided by different methods of reasoning; examination of how they reasoned, and how they thought about their own reasoning, helps us to see how they came to hold the views they did, and how our own methods of enquiry have developed under their influence. Contributors include Terence Irwin, Patricia (...)
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  27. Adriana Cavarero (1995). In Spite of Plato: A Feminist Rewriting of Ancient Philosophy. Routledge.score: 135.0
    This pathbreaking work pursues two interwoven themes. Firstly, it engages in a deconstruction of Ancient philosopher's texts--mainly from Plato, but also from Homer and Parmenides--in order to free four Greek female figures from the patriarchal discourse which for centuries had imprisoned them in a particular role. Secondly, it attempts to construct a symbolic female order, reinterpreting these figures from a new perspective. Building on the theory of sexual difference, Cavarero shows that death is the central category on which the whole (...)
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  28. Sylvia Berryman (2009). The Mechanical Hypothesis in Ancient Greek Natural Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 135.0
    In this 2009 book Sylvia Berryman challenges that assumption, arguing that the idea that the world works 'like a machine' can be found in ancient Greek thought, predating the early modern philosophy with which it is most closely associated.
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  29. Barbara Neymeyr, Jochen Schmidt & Bernhard Zimmermann (eds.) (2008). Stoizismus in der Europäischen Philosophie, Literatur, Kunst Und Politik: Eine Kulturgeschichte von der Antike Bis Zur Moderne. De Gruyter.score: 132.0
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  30. D. N. Sedley (1998). Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.score: 129.0
    This book is designed to appeal both to those interested in Roman poetry and to specialists in ancient philosophy. In it David Sedley explores Lucretius' complex relationship with Greek culture, in particular with Empedocles, whose poetry was the model for his own, with Epicurus, the source of his philosophical inspiration, and with the Greek language itself. He includes a detailed reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature, and seeks to show how Lucretius worked with this as his sole philosophical source, (...)
     
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  31. Myles Burnyeat & Dominic Scott (eds.) (2007). Maieusis: Essays in Ancient Philosophy in Honour of Myles Burnyeat. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Maieusis pays tribute to the highly influential work of Myles Burnyeat, whose contributions to the study of ancient philosophy have done much to enhance the ...
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  32. Stanley Rosen (1988). The Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry: Studies in Ancient Thought. Routledge.score: 120.0
    The Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry i In Book Ten of the Republic, Socrates refers to a long-standing quarrel between philosophy and poetry. ...
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  33. C. C. W. Taylor (2007/2008). Pleasure, Mind, and Soul: Selected Papers in Ancient Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    Pleasure, Mind, and Soul provides a fascinating survey of a range of important topics in the work of some of the greatest ancient philosophers, and which remain ...
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  34. W. H. S. Jones (1979). Philosophy and Medicine in Ancient Greece: With an Edition of Peri Archaiēs Iētrikēs. Arno Press.score: 120.0
    SECTION I THE PRE-HIPPOCRATICS AND PLATO So far as is known Ionian philosophy was not connected with medicine in any way. It was, in fact, a thing apart, ...
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  35. G. E. R. Lloyd (2003). In the Grip of Disease: Studies in the Greek Imagination. Oxford University Press.score: 120.0
    This original and lively book uses texts from ancient medicine, epic, lyric, tragedy, historiography, philosophy, and religion to explore the influence of Greek ideas on health and disease on Greek thought. Fundamental issues are deeply implicated: causation and responsibility, purification and pollution, the mind-body relationship and gender differences, authority and the expert, reality and appearances, good government, and good and evil themselves.
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  36. Richard Seaford (2004). Money and the Early Greek Mind: Homer, Philosophy, Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    How were the Greeks of the sixth century BC able to invent philosophy and tragedy? Richard Seaford argues that a large part of the answer can be found in another momentous development, the invention and rapid spread of coinage. By transforming social relations, monetization contributed to the concepts of the universe as an impersonal system (fundamental to Presocratic philosophy) and of the individual alienated from his own kin and from the gods, as found in tragedy.
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  37. Daniel Tompsett (2012). Wallace Stevens and Pre-Socratic Philosophy: Metaphysics and the Play of Violence. Routledge.score: 120.0
    This book studies Wallace Stevens and pre-Socratic poetic philosophy, showing how concepts that animate Stevens’ poetry parallel concepts found in the works of Parmenides, Heraclitus, Empedocles, and Xenophanes.
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  38. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.score: 117.0
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, a (...)
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  39. David Wolfsdorf (2013). Pleasure in Ancient Greek Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 117.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. Pleasure in early Greek ethics; 3. Pleasure in the early physical tradition; 4. Plato on pleasure and restoration; 5. Plato on true, untrue and false pleasures; 6. Aristotle on pleasure and activation; 7. Epicurus and the Cyrenaics on katastematic and kinetic pleasures; 8. The Old Stoics on pleasure as passion; 9. Contemporary conceptions of pleasure; 10. Ancient and contemporary conceptions of pleasure; Suggestions for further reading.
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  40. Shi Ningzhong (2010). Proposition, Definition and Inference in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):414-431.score: 117.0
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  41. Gordon Lindsay Campbell (2003). Lucretius on Creation and Evolution: A Commentary on De Rerum Natura, Book Five, Lines 772-1104. Oxford University Press.score: 114.0
    Lucretius' account of the origin of life, the origin of species, and human prehistory (first century BC) is the longest and most detailed account extant from the ancient world. It is a mechanistic theory that does away with the need for any divine design, and has been seen as a forerunner of Darwin's theory of evolution. This commentary seeks to locate Lucretius in both the ancient and modern contexts. The recent revival of creationism makes this study particularly relevant to contemporary (...)
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  42. Monica Gale (1994). Myth and Poetry in Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 114.0
    The employment of mythological language and imagery by an Epicurean poet - an adherent of a system not only materialist, but overtly hostile to myth and poetry - is highly paradoxical. This apparent contradiction has often been ascribed to a conflict in the poet between reason and intellect, or to a desire to enliven his philosophical material with mythological digressions. This book attempts to provide a more positive assessment of Lucretius' aims and methodology by considering the poet's attitude to myth, (...)
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  43. Malcolm Heath (2012). Ancient Philosophical Poetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 114.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Poetry: the roots of a problem; 2. A radical solution: Plato's Republic; 3. The natural history of poetry: Aristotle; 4. Ways to find truth in falsehood; 5. The marriage of Homer and Plato.
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  44. David Robjant (forthcoming). What Use is Literature to Political Philosophy? Or: The Funny Thing About Socrates’ Nose. Philosophy and Literature.score: 114.0
    Readers of Plato’s Republic wildly underestimate Thrasymachus’ challenge if they treat it as a claim about ‘justice’, and in grasping Plato’s response it is dangerous to confuse his aims and methods with those agreed on by his characters. Plato’s service to political philosophy is not merely literary, but comic. Plato’s drama exposes and ridicules a generalisation from Thrasymachus' own moral psychology at the heart of Thrasymachus’ political vision. Insight and comedy are born together when a pig who theorises a city (...)
     
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  45. Frederick E. Brenk (2007). With Unperfumed Voice: Studies in Plutarch, in Greek Literature, Religion and Philosophy, and in the New Testament Background. Steiner.score: 112.5
  46. Chenyang Li (2008). The Ideal of Harmony in Ancient Chinese and Greek Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (1):81-98.score: 111.0
    This article offers a study of the early formation and development of the ideal of harmony in ancient Chinese philosophy and ancient Greek philosophy. It shows that, unlike the Pythagorean notion of harmony, which is primarily based on a linear progressive model with a pre-set order, the ancient Chinese concept of harmony is best understood as a comprehensive process of harmonization. It encompasses spatial as well as temporal dimensions, metaphysical as well as moral and aesthetical dimensions. It is a fundamentally (...)
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  47. John Peter Anton, George L. Kustas & Anthony Preus (eds.) (1971). Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy. State University of New York Press.score: 111.0
    Preface The editors of this volume wish to express their appreciation for the trust which the officers and membership of the Society for Ancient Greek ...
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  48. Jaap Mansfeld, Keimpe Algra, der Horst, Pieter Willem & David T. Runia (eds.) (1996). Polyhistory: Studies in the History and Historiography of Ancient Philosophy : Presented to Jaap Mansfeld on His Sixtieth Birthday. BRILL.score: 111.0
    It frequently concentrates on the subjects in which the honorand has made important discoveries. The volume concludes with a complete bibliography of Jaap Mansfeld's scholarly work so far.
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  49. Chike Jeffers (2013). Embodying Justice in Ancient Egypt: The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant as a Classic of Political Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):421-442.score: 111.0
    This article is an introduction to an ancient Egyptian text called The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant and an argument that it ought to be seen as a classic of political philosophy. After contextualizing the tale as part of a tradition of moral and political philosophy in ancient Egypt, I explore the methods by which the text defines the proper roles of political authority and contrast its approach to justifying political authority with the argument from the state of nature so (...)
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  50. Patricia Cruzalegui Sotelo (2006). The Platonic Experience in Nineteenth-Century England. Pontificia Universidad Católica Del Perú, Fondo Editorial.score: 111.0
     
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