Search results for 'Philosophy, Ancient, in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & International Society for Phenomenology and Literature (1982). The Philosophical Reflection of Man in Literature Selected Papers From Several Conferences Held by the International Society for Phenomenology and Literature in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
     
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  2.  23
    Catherine Osborne (2007/2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  3. Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Animal rights do not feature explicitly in ancient thought. Indeed the notion of natural rights in general is not obviously present in the classical world. Plato and Aristotle are typically read as racist and elitist thinkers who barely recognise the humanity of their fellow humans. Surely they would be the last to show up as models of the humane view of other kinds?In this unusual philosophy book, Catherine Osborne asks the reader to think again. She shows that Plato's views on (...)
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  4. Catherine Osborne (2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This unusual philosophy book asks the reader to reconsider the received view that animal rights have no place in ancient thought. Catherine Osborne argues that by reflecting on the work of the ancient philosophers and poets, we can see when and how we lost touch with the natural intelligence of dumb animals.
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  5.  2
    Sean McConnell (2015). Marina Berzins McCoy , Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (1):35-37.
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  6. Taneli Kukkonen (2007). Catherine Osborne, Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 27:432-434.
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  7.  2
    Marina Berzins McCoy (2013). Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy. OUP Oxford.
    McCoy examines how Greek epic, tragedy, and philosophy offer important insights into the nature of human vulnerability, especially how Greek thought extols the recognition and proper acceptance of vulnerability. Beginning with the literary works of Homer and Sophocles, she also expands her analysis to the philosophical works of Plato and Aristotle.
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  8.  5
    Paul Woodruff (2014). McCoy, Marina. Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 68 (2):434-436.
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  9.  95
    D. Clough (2009). Book Review: Catherine Osborne, Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007). Xiii + 262 Pp. 42.00 (Hb), ISBN 978--0--19--928206--. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):246-250.
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  10.  3
    Roger S. Bagnall & Peter Darow (2004). Allen, Pauline, and Bronwen Neil, Trans. And Eds. Maximus the Confessor and His Companions: Documents From Exile. Oxford Early Christian Texts. Oxford: Ox-Ford University Press, 2002. Xvi+ 210 Pp. 2 Maps. Cloth, $70. Bakewell, Geoffrey W., and James P. Sickinger, Eds. Gestures: Essays in Ancient History, Literature, and Philosophy Presented to Alan L. Boegehold on the Occa. [REVIEW] American Journal of Philology 125:157-162.
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  11.  11
    Ryan Balot (2006). Bakewell (G.W.), Sickinger (J.P.) (Edd.) Gestures. Essays in Ancient History, Literature, and Philosophy Presented to Alan L. Boegehold on the Occasion of His Retirement and His Seventy-Fifth Birthday . Pp. Xii + 363, Ills. Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 1-84217-086-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):235-.
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  12.  10
    Frederick E. Brenk (1998). Relighting the Souls: Studies in Plutarch, in Greek Literature, Religion, and Philosophy, and in the New Testament Background. Franz Steiner Verlag.
    This collection contains many stimulating and important articles from the Plutarch renaissance, especially on the interaction between divine and human worlds, ...
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  13.  57
    Alice Crary (2009). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature – by Catherine Osborne. Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):191-197.
  14.  8
    William O. Stephens (2008). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Social Theory and Practice 34 (1):139-145.
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  15.  15
    Douglas Cairns (2007). Philosophy (D.) Konstan The Emotions of the Ancient Greeks. Studies in Aristotle and Classical Literature. (Robson Classical Lectures). U. Of Toronto P., 2006. Pp. Xvi + 422. £55. 9780802091031. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:248-.
  16.  7
    John Dillon (2008). Osborne (C.) Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers. Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Pp. Xiv + 262. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Cased, £40. ISBN: 978-0-19-928206-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01):76-78.
  17. Tania L. Gergel (2004). Plato as Literature (J.) Annas and (C.) Rowe Eds. New Perspectives on Plato, Modern and Ancient. Harvard UP, 2002. Pp. Xii + 270. £33.50. 0674010183. (A.) Michelini Ed. Plato as Author. The Rhetoric of Philosophy. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003. Pp. Vii + 359. €40/$50. 9004128786. (S.) Blondell The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Cambridge UP, 2002. Pp. Xi + 452. £55/$75. 0521793009. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:174-178.
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  18. Susan Lape (2008). Philosophy (C.) Osborne Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers. Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007. Pp. Xi + 262. £40. 9780199282067. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:275-.
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  19.  92
    Bruno Snell (1960/1982). The Discovery of the Mind: In Greek Philosophy and Literature. Dover.
    German classicist's monumental study of the origins of European thought in Greek literature and philosophy. Brilliant, widely influential. Includes "Homer's View of Man," "The Olympian Gods," "The Rise of the Individual in the Early Greek Lyric," "Pindar's Hymn to Zeus," "Myth and Reality in Greek Tragedy," and "Aristophanes and Aesthetic Criticism.".
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  20.  5
    Duncan F. Kennedy (2013). Antiquity and the Meanings of Time: A Philosophy of Ancient and Modern Literature. I.B. Tauris.
    Does Augustine put his finger on time? -- Time for history -- Determination -- Self-determination -- Time, knowledge and truth.
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  21. Wolfgang Reisinger (1996). Ancient Myth and Philosophy in Peter Russell's Agamemnon in Hades. Edwin Mellen Press.
     
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  22. Louis Mackey (2002). An Ancient Quarrel Continued: The Troubled Marriage of Philosophy and Literature. University Press of America.
    In An Ancient Quarrel Continued, Louis Mackey argues that the relationship of philosophy with the literary arts is more intimate, more problematic, and more interesting than its relationship with the sciences.
     
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  23. William Franke (ed.) (2007). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and the Arts: Volume 1: Classic Formulations. University of Notre Dame Press.
    “Any writer worth his salt knows that what cannot be spoken is ultimately the thing worth speaking about; yet most often this humbling awareness is unsaid or covered up. There are some who have made it their business, however, to court failure and acknowledge defeat, to explore the impasse of words before silence. William Franke has created an anthology of such explorations, undertaken in poetry and prose, that stretches from Plato to the present. Whether the subject of discourse is All (...)
     
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  24. William Franke (ed.) (2007). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and the Arts: Volume 2: Modern and Contemporary Transformations. University of Notre Dame Press.
    “Any writer worth his salt knows that what cannot be spoken is ultimately the thing worth speaking about; yet most often this humbling awareness is unsaid or covered up. There are some who have made it their business, however, to court failure and acknowledge defeat, to explore the impasse of words before silence. William Franke has created an anthology of such explorations, undertaken in poetry and prose, that stretches from Plato to the present. Whether the subject of discourse is All (...)
     
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  25.  9
    Martha Craven Nussbaum (2001). The Fragility of Goodness: Luck and Ethics in Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of ancient views about 'moral luck'. It examines the fundamental ethical problem that many of the valued constituents of a well-lived life are vulnerable to factors outside a person's control, and asks how this affects our appraisal of persons and their lives. The Greeks made a profound contribution to these questions, yet neither the problems nor the Greek views of them have received the attention they deserve. This book thus recovers a central dimension of Greek (...)
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  26.  27
    Etienne Lepicard (2010). The Embryo in Ancient Rabbinic Literature: Between Religious Law and Didactic Narratives: An Interpretive Essay. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1):21-41.
    At a time when bioethical issues are at the top of public and political agendas, there is a renewed interest in representations of the embryo in various religious traditions. One of the major traditions that have contributed to Western representations of the embryo is the Jewish tradition. This tradition poses some difficulties that may deter scholars, but also presents some invaluable advantages. These derive from two components, the search for limits and narrativity, both of which are directly connected with the (...)
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  27.  3
    John L. Lepage (2012). The Revival of Antique Philosophy in the Renaissance. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book examines the revival of antique philosophy in the Renaissance as a literary preoccupation informed by wit.
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  28. Christopher Gill (1996). Personality in Greek Epic, Tragedy, and Philosophy: The Self in Dialogue. Clarendon Press.
    This is a major study of conceptions of selfhood and personality in Homer and Greek Tragedy and Philosophy. The focus is on the norms of personality in Greek psychology and ethics. Gill argues that the key to understanding Greek thought of this type is to counteract the subjective and individualistic aspects of our own thinking about the person. He defines an "objective-participant" conception of personality, symbolized by the idea of the person as an interlocutor in a series of psychological (...)
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  29. Frederick E. Brenk (2007). With Unperfumed Voice: Studies in Plutarch, in Greek Literature, Religion and Philosophy, and in the New Testament Background. Steiner.
  30. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue (...)
     
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  31.  8
    Pamela Schirmeister (1999). Less Legible Meanings: Between Poetry and Philosophy in the Work of Emerson. Stanford University Press.
    Examining both why and how Emerson evades the ancient quarrel between literature and philosophy, this book entirely rethinks the nature of Emerson's radical individualism and its relation to the possibility of an ethics and a politics. The author argues that the quarrel between literature and philosophy never took place in America, and that instead traditional philosophical work staged itself here as a form of literary praxis and cultural therapeutics, epitomized in the work of Emerson. A revisionary study of (...)
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  32.  22
    Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  33. Eliza Gregory Wilkins (1979). "Know Thyself" in Greek and Latin Literature.
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  34. Susanna Morton Braund & Christopher Gill (1997). The Passions in Roman Thought and Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  35.  49
    Brett Bourbon (2004). Finding a Replacement for the Soul: Mind and Meaning in Literature and Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    Approaching the study of literature as a unique form of the philosophy of language and mind--as a study of how we produce nonsense and imagine it as sense--this ...
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  36.  12
    Nancy Yousef (2004). Isolated Cases: The Anxieties of Autonomy in Enlightenment Philosophy and Romantic Literature. Cornell University Press.
    While individuals presented in central texts of the period are indeed often alone or separated from others, Yousef regards this isolation as a problem the texts attempt to illuminate, rather than a condition they construct as normative or ...
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  37.  3
    Julian L. Ross (1950). Philosophy in Literature. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):141-142.
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  38.  18
    Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.
    Lucretius' didactic poem De rerum natura ('On the Nature of Things') is an impassioned and visionary presentation of the materialist philosophy of Epicurus, and one of the most powerful poetic texts of antiquity. After its rediscovery in 1417 it became a controversial and seminal work in successive phases of literary history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. In this Cambridge Companion experts in the history of literature, philosophy and science discuss the poem in its ancient contexts and in (...)
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  39.  15
    Ullrich Langer (1994). Perfect Friendship: Studies in Literature and Moral Philosophy From Boccaccio to Corneille. Librairie Droz.
    I am grateful to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a year-long fellowship that enabled me to write major portions of this book; ...
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  40. Morris Weitz (1963). Philosophy in Literature: Shakespeare, Voltaire, Tolstoy & Proust. Detroit, Wayne State University Press.
     
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  41. Charles W. Johnson (1992). Philosophy in Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  42. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature: Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light. Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  43. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light /Konstantin Kolenda. --. --. Barnes & Noble, Books,1982.
     
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  44. H. P. Rickman (1996). Philosophy in Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  45.  51
    Zailin Zhang (2009). Theories of Family in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):343-359.
    Unlike traditional Western philosophy, which places no special emphasis on the importance of family structure, traditional Chinese philosophy represented by Confucianism is a set of theories that give family a primary position. With family as the foundation, a complete framework of “human body → two genders → family and clan” is formed. Therefore, family in Chinese philosophy is existent, gender-interactive and diachronic. It should also be noted that family also plays a fundamental role in Chinese theories on cosmology, religion, and (...)
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  46.  25
    Ningzhong Shi (2010). Proposition, Definition and Inference in Ancient Chinese Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):414-431.
    This article attempts to explore ancient Chinese philosophical thought by analyzing how pioneering Chinese thinkers made judgments and inferences, and compares it to ancient Greek philosophy. It first addresses the starting-point and the object of cognition in Chinese ancient philosophy, then analyses how early thinkers construed definition and proposition, and finally discusses how they made inferences on the basis of definition and proposition. It points out that categorization is an important methodology in ancient Chinese philosophy, and that rectification of names (...)
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  47. Hermann S. Schibli (1990). Pherekydes of Syros. Clarendon Press.
    In the sixth century BC, Pherekydes of Syros, the reputed teacher of Pythagoras and contemporary of Thales and Anaximander, wrote a book about the birth of the gods and the origin of the cosmos. Considered one of the first prose works of Greek literature, Pherekydes' book survives only in fragments. On the basis of these as well as the ancient testimonies, the author attempts to reconstruct the theo-cosmological schema of Pherekydes. An introductory chapter on the life of Pherekydes is (...)
     
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  48.  1
    L. T. Pearcy (1991). Diagnosis as Narrative in Ancient Literature. American Journal of Philology 113 (4):595-616.
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  49. Richard Kannicht (1988). The Ancient Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry: Aspects of the Greek Conception of Literature. University of Canterbury.
     
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  50. Guido Kums, Hugo Roeffaers, Elisabeth Bekers & D. J. Conlon (eds.) (2004). Sans Everything: Essays on English Literature, Philosophy, and Culture in Honour of Guido Kums and Hugo Roeffaers. Acco.
     
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