Search results for 'Philosophy, Asian Dictionaries' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ruth Reyna (1984). Dictionary of Oriental Philosophy. Munshiram Manoharlal.score: 228.0
  2. Ingrid Fischer-Schreiber, Stephan Schuhmacher & Gert Woerner (eds.) (1989). The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy and Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen. Shambhala.score: 207.0
  3. Oliver Leaman (ed.) (2001). Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy. Routledge.score: 152.0
    From Abhidharma to Zurvan, this important new resource identifies and defines the principal concepts and individuals in Asian philosophy throughout the world. The comprehensive geographic coverage encompasses China, Japan, India, the Middle East, the United States and Australasia, with an emphasis on contemporary developments and movements. Featuring 650 signed A-Z entries, the Encyclopedia emphasises the present-day vitality of Asian philosophy, and provides extensive coverage of trends such as the reciprocal exchange of theories between East and West, and new (...)
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  4. Joel Kupperman (2007). Classic Asian Philosophy: A Guide to the Essential Texts. Oxford University Press.score: 152.0
    This is a second, revised edition of Kupperman's introduction to Asian philosophy via its canonical texts. Kupperman ranges from the Upanishads to the Bhagavad Gita through Confucius to Zen Buddhism, walking students through the texts, conveying the vitality and appeal of the works, and explaining their philosophical roots. Kupperman has made revisions throughout the text, clarifying where necessary, and added a new chapter on al-Arabi's The Bezels of Wisdom, a classic of Islamic Sufism.
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  5. Joel Kupperman (1999). Learning From Asian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 152.0
    In an attempt to bridge the vast divide between classical Asian thought and contemporary Western philosophy, Joel J. Kupperman finds that the two traditions do not, by and large, supply different answers to the same questions. Rather, each tradition is searching for answers to their own set of questions--mapping out distinct philosophical investigations. In this groundbreaking book, Kupperman argues that the foundational Indian and Chinese texts include lines of thought that can enrich current philosophical practice, and in some cases (...)
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  6. Brian Carr & Indira Mahalingam (eds.) (2000). Companion Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy. Routledge.score: 152.0
    The Companion Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy is a unique one-volume reference work which will make a broad range of richly varied philosophical, ethical and theological traditions accessible to a wide audience. The Encyclopedia is divided into 6 sections, each of which covers a specific tradition within Asian philosophy including Zoroastrian or Persian , Indian , Buddhist , Chinese , Japanese and Islamic . Within each section the chapters cover such important areas as origins of the tradition, approaches to (...)
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  7. David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.) (2009). Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.score: 116.0
    Asian Texts -- Asian Contexts helps bring Asian philosophy and religion into wider classroom consideration by giving nonspecialists entree to primary texts from ...
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  8. Jennifer McWeeny & Ashby Butnor (eds.) (2014). Asian and Feminist Philosophies in Dialogue: Liberating Traditions. Columbia University Press.score: 116.0
    In this collection of original essays, international scholars put Asian traditions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, into conversation with one or more contemporary feminist philosophies, founding a new mode of inquiry that attends to diverse voices and the complex global relationships that define our world. -/- These cross-cultural meditations focus on the liberation of persons from suffering, oppression, illusion, harmful conventions and desires, and other impediments to full personhood by deploying a methodology that traverses multiple philosophical styles, (...)
     
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  9. James T. Bretzke (2001). Bibliography on East Asian Religion and Philosophy. E. Mellen Press.score: 108.0
    Machine generated contents note: INTRODUCTION 1 -- Focus of the Sections and Sub-sections 1 -- East Asian Internet Resources 1 -- A Note on Using the Index 2 -- GENERAL WORKS ON PHILOSOPHY& RELIGION IN ASIA 5 -- BUDDHISM 37 -- Primary Sources 37 -- Buddhist Ethics 38 -- Buddhism and Judeo-Christianity 52 -- Zen Buddhism 69 -- Other Works on Buddhism 76 -- CONFUCIANISM 95 -- Chinese and Confucian Classics 95 -- Translations of the Four Books 95 -- (...)
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  10. Robert Audi (ed.) (1999). The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 108.0
    Widely acclaimed as the most authoritative and accessible one-volume dictionary available in English (and now with translations into Chinese, Korean, Russian, Italian, and Spanish underway) this second edition offers an even richer, more comprehensive, and more up-to-date survey of ideas and thinkers written by an international team of 436 contributors. Includes the most comprehensive entries on major philosophers, 400 new entries including over 50 on preeminent contemporary philosophers, extensive coverage of rapidly developing fields such as the philosophy of mind and (...)
     
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  11. Larry D. Harwood (2011). Recent Texts in Asian Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 34 (2):151-161.score: 102.0
    This review article surveys five recent texts in the field of Asian philosophy. The reviewer looks at the practicability of each work for the classroom, as well as for scholars in the field. Strong points of each text are noted, as well as the intricacies of the introductions to each text supplied by the editor or translator of the respective books.The texts reviewed have as their subject China and Confucianism, with the exception of one work on Zen, though the (...)
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  12. Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.score: 98.0
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as (...)
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  13. Yoko Arisaka, Asian Women: Invisibility, Locations, and Claims to Philosophy.score: 96.0
    Asian women” is an ambiguous category; it seems to indicate a racial as well as a cultural designation. The number of articles or books on being Asian or Asian-American is on the rise in other disciplines, but in comparison to the material on black or Hispanic identities, Asians are largely missing from the field of philosophy of race. Things Asian in philosophy are generally reserved for those who study Asian philosophy or comparative philosophy, but that (...)
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  14. A. T. Nuyen (1999). Chinese Philosophy and Western Capitalism. Asian Philosophy 9 (1):71 – 79.score: 96.0
    It is commonly supposed that people of Asia, particularly the ethnic Chinese, subscribe to values which are not conducive to economic progress. The gap between the capitalist West and Asia is often attributed to the 'cultural' factor. Behind such perception is the supposition that capitalism is wholly a product of the West, alien to Asia and cannot be successfully embraced without doing violence to its cultural traditions. Against this position, I argue that classical capitalism is perfectly compatible with the key (...)
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  15. Brian Carr (ed.) (1996). Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon.score: 96.0
    This collection arises from the First Conference of the recently formed European Society for Asian Philosophy.
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  16. Syliane Charles (forthcoming). Phi 256 B Asian Philosophy. Asian Philosophy.score: 96.0
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  17. Roger Reid Jackson (1996). Human Insufficiency in Shinran and Kierkegaard (Special Conference Issue: Second Conference of the European Society for Asian Philosophy, University of Exeter, UK, 1995). Asian Philosophy 6:117-127.score: 96.0
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  18. Simon Blackburn (2008). The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy. Oxford ;Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    Comprehensive and authoritative the Dictionary of Philosophy contains over 2,500 entries, including biographies of nearly 500 influential philosophers. The dictionary provides wide-ranging and lively coverage of not only Western philosophical traditions, but also themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Jewish philosophy. This clear and easy to use reference also contains in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, and a chronology of philosophical events stretching from 10,000 BC to the present day.
     
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  19. Puqun Li (2012). A Guide to Asian Philosophy Classics. Broadview Press.score: 96.0
    This book guides readers through ten classic works of Asian philosophy. Several major schools of Eastern thought are discussed, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism/Taoism, and Chan/Zen. The author connects the ideas of these schools to those of Western philosophy, thereby making the material accessible to people who are unfamiliar with the cultures and intellectual traditions of Asia. A wide range of important topics are addressed: reality, time, self, knowledge, ethics, human nature, enlightenment, and death.
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  20. Jeeloo Liu & Douglas Berger (eds.) (2014). Nothingness in Asian Philosophy. Routledge.score: 96.0
    A variety of crucial and still most relevant ideas about nothingness or emptiness have gained profound philosophical prominence in the history and development of a number of South and East Asian traditions—including in Buddhism, Daoism, Neo-Confucianism, Hinduism, Korean philosophy, and the Japanese Kyoto School. These traditions share the insight that in order to explain both the great mysteries and mundane facts about our experience, ideas of "nothingness" must play a primary role. This collection of essays brings together the work (...)
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  21. Karel Werner (1997). Pali Buddhism: Curzon Studies in Asian Philosophy. Asian Philosophy 7:239-240.score: 96.0
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  22. Mario Augusto Bunge (1999). Dictionary of Philosophy. Prometheus Books.score: 92.0
  23. John Dankowski (1977). An English-Chinese Dictionary of Chinese Traditional Philosophy. Chinese News & World Report.score: 92.0
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  24. John A. Grimes (1988). A Concise Dictionary of Indian Philosophy: Sanskrit-English. Radhakrishnan Institute for Advanced Study in Philosophy, University of Madras.score: 92.0
     
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  25. Matthew R. Dasti (2012). Theism in Asian Philosophy. In C. Taliaferro, V. Harrison & S. Goetz (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Theism. Routledge.score: 90.0
    This paper examines of the intersection of theism and philosophy in classical Indian thought, focusing on the rational theology of Nyaya and the revealed theology of Vedanta. I also consider anti-theistic arguments, primarily by classical Buddhists.
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  26. Roger Ames, Robert C. Solomon & Joel Marks (eds.) (1995). Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy. SUNY Press.score: 84.0
    This book broadens the inquiry into emotion to comprehend a comparative cultural outlook. It begins with an overview of recent work in the West, and then proceeds to the main business of scrutinizing various relevant issues from both Asian and comparative perspectives. Original essays by experts in the field. Finally, Robert Solomon comments and summarizes.
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  27. Ting-Chao Chou (2008). A New Look at the Ancient Asian Philosophy Through Modern Mathematical and Topological Scientific Analysis. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:21-39.score: 84.0
    The unified theory of dose and effect, as indicated by the median-effect equation for single and multiple entities and for the first and higher order kinetic/dynamic, has been established by T.C. Chou and it is based on the physical/chemical principle of the massaction law (J. Theor. Biol. 59: 253-276, 1976 (質量作用中效定理) and Pharmacological Rev. 58: 621-681, 2006) (普世中效指數定理). The theory was developed by the principle of mathematical induction and deduction (數學演繹歸納法). Rearrangements of the median-effect equation lead to Michaelis-Menten, Hill, Scatchard, (...)
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  28. James W. Heisig (2010). East Asian Philosophy and the Case Against Perfect Translations. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):81-90.score: 84.0
    In this essay the author argues for rethinking the canons of translation of East Asian philosophical texts in order to draw Western philosophers more deeply into conversation with them.
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  29. M. Baldwin (ed.) (1998). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology. Westview.score: 84.0
  30. James Mark Baldwin (1940). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education, and Giving a Terminology in English, French, German, and Italian. New York, P. Smith.score: 84.0
  31. Antony Flew (ed.) (1999/1984). A Dictionary of Philosophy. Gramercy Books.score: 84.0
    What is logic? What were the most significant contributions of Kant, Plato and Descartes? What is the concept of yin and yang? The personalities, terminology, and definitions of philosophers and philosophical schools of thought are presented clearly in this unique A-to-Z reference guide.
     
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  32. Ivan Timofeevich Frolov (ed.) (1984). Dictionary of Philosophy. Progress Publishers.score: 84.0
     
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  33. John M. Koller (2009). The Importance of Asian Philosophy in the Curriculum. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.score: 84.0
     
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  34. A. R. Lacey (1986). A Dictionary of Philosophy. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 84.0
     
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  35. Geddes MacGregor (1989). Dictionary of Religion and Philosophy. Paragon House.score: 84.0
     
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  36. Thomas Mautner (1997). The Penguin Dictionary of Philosophy. Penguin Books.score: 84.0
     
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  37. H. Odera Oruka & D. A. Masolo (eds.) (1983). Philosophy and Cultures: Proceedings of 2nd Afro-Asian Philosophy Conference, Nairobi, October/November 1981. Bookwise Ltd..score: 84.0
     
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  38. William L. Reese (1996/1999). Dictionary of Philosophy and Religion: Eastern and Western Thought. Humanity Books.score: 84.0
     
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  39. Murad Saifulin & Richard R. Dixon (eds.) (1984). Dictionary of Philosophy. International Publishers.score: 84.0
     
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  40. Murād Wahbah (ed.) (1978). Philosophy & Civilization: Proceedings of the First Afro-Asian Philosophy Co[Nf]Erence, 13th to 16th March, 1978, Cairo (Egypt). [REVIEW] Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University.score: 84.0
     
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  41. Frank J. Hoffman (1981). St Elmo Nauman Jr. Dictionary of Asian Philosophies. Pp. 372. (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1979.) £7·50 (Cloth); £4·25 (Paper). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 17 (2):284.score: 81.0
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  42. Louis A. Barth (1979). Dictionary of Asian Philosophies. By St. Elmo Nauman. The Modern Schoolman 57 (1):92-92.score: 81.0
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  43. John B. Chethimattam (1979). Dictionary of Asian Philosophies. Thought 54 (4):431-437.score: 81.0
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  44. Ray Billington (1997). Understanding Eastern Philosophy. Routledge.score: 80.0
    Ray Billington explores the spirituality of Eastern thought and its differences from and relationships with the Western religious tradition by presenting the main principles of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Jainism and Confucianism. Billington discusses the central themes of religious philosophy, comparing Eastern and Western views of belief of God, the soul, moral decision-making, nature, faith and authority. He then challenges theism, particularly Christianity, with its belief in a personal God bestowing a certain version of "truth". He concludes that the universal mysticism (...)
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  45. Oliver Leaman (1999). Key Concepts in Eastern Philosophy. Routledge.score: 80.0
    This invaluable survey covers all of the main terms and concepts used in Eastern philosophy. It clearly defines the essential philosophical ideas linked to the traditions of Persia, the Islamic world, Japan, India, China and Tibet, and discusses the major principles of Zoroastrianism, Sufism, Confucianism, Taoism, Hinduism, Shintoism, Buddhism, and beyond. Each entry includes a lively and authoritative critical analysis of the term or concept covered. This book is a uniquely helpful source for anyone interested in coming to grips with (...)
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  46. Oliver Leaman (2000). Eastern Philosophy: Key Readings. Routledge.score: 80.0
    Eastern Philosophy: Key Readings provides the key texts central to an understanding of eastern philosophy. The book will prove invaluable to all those seeeking a better understanding of eastern ways of thought. The extracts are grouped under thematic headings from Bhagavad-Gita and caste to nirvana and yin-yang. In addition to compiling the volume, Oliver Leaman has written clear and concise introductions to the themes and concepts covered by the quotations. With its concluding glossary of terms and persons, Eastern Philosophy is (...)
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  47. Youru Wang (ed.) (2007). Deconstruction and the Ethical in Asian Thought. Routledge.score: 80.0
    Ethical dimension and deconstruction of normative ethics in Asia traditions -- Similarities and differences between Derridean-Levinasian and Asian ethical thought.
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  48. Irene Bloom & Joshua A. Fogel (eds.) (1997). Meeting of Minds: Intellectual and Religious Interaction in East Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Honor of Wing-Tsit Chan and William Theodore De Bary. Columbia University Press.score: 80.0
    -- William Nester, Asian Thought & Society.
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  49. Blo-Bzaṅ-Chos-Kyi-Ñi-Ma (2009). The Crystal Mirror of Philosophical Systems: A Tibetan Study of Asian Religious Thought. Wisdom Publicatiaons.score: 80.0
    Indian schools -- Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism -- The Nyingma tradition -- The Kadam tradition -- The Kagyü tradition -- The Shijé tradition -- The Sakya tradition -- The Jonang and minor traditions -- The Geluk tradition 1: Tsongkhapa -- The Geluk tradition 2: Tsongkhapa's successors -- The Geluk tradition 3: the distinctiveness of Geluk -- The Bon tradition -- Chinese traditions 1: non-Buddhist -- Chinese traditions 2: Buddhist -- Central Asian traditions.
     
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  50. Kevin Burns (2006). Eastern Philosophy: The Greatest Thinkers and Sages From Ancient to Modern Times. Enchanted Lion Books.score: 80.0
    A clear and engaging presentation of history's most influential Eastern thinkers Eastern Philosophy provides a detailed but accessible analysis of the work of nearly sixty thinkers from all of the major Eastern philosophical traditions, from the earliest times to the present day. Covering systems, schools, and individuals, Eastern Philosophy presents founder figures such as Zoroaster and Mohammed as well as modern thinkers such as Nishida Kitaro, perhaps the preeminent figure within modern Japanese philosophy. From Buddhism to Islam, Confucius to Gandhi, (...)
     
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