Search results for 'Philosophy, British' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stuart C. Brown (ed.) (1996). British Philosophy and the Age of Enlightenment. Routledge.score: 156.0
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as the "Enlightenment," a period of empricist reaction to the great seventeeth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in the Enlightenment as a whole. (...)
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  2. Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (eds.) (2002). New British Philosophy. Routledge.score: 156.0
    What do real philosophers do? What are the big philosophical issues of today? Clear and engaging, New British Philosophy contains sixteen fascinating interviews with some of the top philosophers working in Britain today, on topics that range from music to the mind and feminism to the future of philosophy. This unique snapshot of philosophy today includes interviews with: Ray Monk, Nigel Warburton, Aaron Ridley, Jonathan Wolff, Roger Crisp, Rae Langton, Miranda Fricker, M.G.F. Martin, Timothy Williamson, Tim Crane, Robin Le (...)
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  3. James A. Harris (2005). Of Liberty and Necessity: The Free Will Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 138.0
    The eighteenth century was a time of brilliant philosophical innovation in Britain. In Of Liberty and Necessity James A. Harris presents the first comprehensive account of the period's discussion of what remains a central problem of philosophy, the question of the freedom of the will. He offers new interpretations of contributions to the free will debate made by canonical figures such as Locke, Hume, Edwards, and Reid, and also discusses in detail the arguments of some less familiar writers. Harris puts (...)
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  4. Rudolf Metz (1938). A Hundred Years of British Philosophy. New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 138.0
    GROUPS INTERESTED IN RELIGIOUS PHILOSOPHY 184 General remarks — The Oxford Movement — John Henry Newman — William George Ward — Francis William Newman ...
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  5. S. P. Rosenbaum (1971). English Literature and British Philosophy. Chicago,University of Chicago Press.score: 138.0
    Fish, S. Georgics of the mind: Bacon's philosophy and the experience of his Essays.--Brett, R. L. Thomas Hobbes.--Watt, I. Realism and the novel.--Tuveson, E. Locke and Sterne.--Kampf, L. Gibbon and Hume.--Frye, N. Blake's case against Locke.--Abrams, M. H. Mechanical and organic psychologies of literary invention.--Ryle, G. Jane Austen and the moralists.--Schneewind, J. B. Moral problems and moral philosophy in the Victorian period.--Donagan, A. Victorian philosophical prose: J. S. Mill and F. H. Bradley.--Pitcher, G. Wittgenstein, nonsense, and Lewis Carroll.--Bolgan, A. C. (...)
     
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  6. Peter R. Anstey (ed.) (2013). The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press.score: 132.0
    These far-reaching essays discuss not only central debates and canonical authors from Francis Bacon to Isaac Newton, but also explore less well-known figures and topics from the period.
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  7. Lia Formigari (1988). Language and Experience in 17th-Century British Philosophy. John Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 132.0
    The focus of this volume is the crisis of the traditional view of the relationship between words and things and the emergence of linguistic arbitrarism in 17th ...
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  8. Thomas H. Brobjer (2007). Nietzsche and the English: The Influence of British and American Thinking on His Philosophy. Humanity Books.score: 132.0
  9. Gustavus Watts Cunningham (1933/1969). The Idealistic Argument in Recent British and American Philosophy. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 132.0
  10. A. C. Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.) (2006). The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum.score: 132.0
    v. 1. A-C -- v. 2. D-J -- v. 3. K-Q -- v. 4. R-Z.
     
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  11. Jaakko Hintikka & Klaus Puhl (eds.) (1995). The British Tradition in 20th Century Philosophy: Proceedings of the 17th International Wittgenstein Symposium, 14th to 21th [Sic] August 1994, Kirchberg Am Wechsel (Austria). [REVIEW] Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.score: 132.0
     
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  12. Charles J. McCracken (1983). Malebranche and British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 132.0
     
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  13. John Sutton (2013). Soul and Body in Seventeenth-Century British Philosophy. In Peter Anstey (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. 285-307.score: 120.0
    Ideas about soul and body – about thinking or remembering, mind and life, brain and self – remain both diverse and controversial in our neurocentric age. The history of these ideas is significant both in its own right and to aid our understanding of the complex sources and nature of our concepts of mind, cognition, and psychology, which are all terms with puzzling, difficult histories. These topics are not the domain of specialists alone, and studies of emotion, perception, or reasoning (...)
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  14. Bryan Magee & Anthony Quinton (eds.) (1971/1986). Modern British Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 108.0
    "Under Magee's sensitive guidance a remarkably coherent interpretation of this period emerges."--Marshall Cohen, Listener. "The whole book has a marvellous air of casualness and clarity that makes it a delight to read."--Colin Wilson. Contemporary British philosophy is experiencing unprecedented openness to influences from abroad. New growth is evident in many areas of traditional philosophy which had been neglected by the logical positivists and the linguistic analysts. This sense of freedom permeates Magee's volume of conversations with leading British philosophers. (...)
     
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  15. Christian Maurer (2009). Self-Love in Early 18th Century British Moral Philosophy: Shaftesbury, Mandeville, Hutcheson, Butler and Campbell. Dissertation, Neuchâtelscore: 108.0
    The study focuses on the debates on self-love in early 18th-century British moral philosophy. It examines the intricate relations of these debates with questions concerning human nature and morality in five central authors: Anthony Ashley Cooper the 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury, Bernard Mandeville, Francis Hutcheson, Joseph Butler and Archibald Campbell. One of the central claims of this study is that a distinction between five different concepts of self-love is necessary to achieve a clear understanding of the debates on self-love. (...)
     
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  16. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943) on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their (...)
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  17. Stephen L. Darwall (1995). The British Moralists and the Internal "Ought", 1640-1740. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    This book is a major work in the history of ethics, and provides the first study of early modern British philosophy in several decades. Professor Darwall discerns two distinct traditions feeding into the moral philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. On the one hand, there is the empirical, naturalist tradition, comprising Hobbes, Locke, Cumberland, Hutcheson, and Hume, which argues that obligation is the practical force that empirical discoveries acquire in the process of deliberation. On the other hand, there (...)
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  18. J. N. Findlay (1966). Studies in Philosophy: British Academy Lectures. New York [Etc.]Oxford U.P..score: 102.0
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  19. Omar W. Nasim (2012). The Spaces of Knowledge: Bertrand Russell, Logical Construction, and the Classification of the Sciences. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1163-1182.score: 96.0
    What Russell regarded to be the ?chief outcome? of his 1914 Lowell Lectures at Harvard can only be fully appreciated, I argue, if one embeds the outcome back into the ?classificatory problem? that many at the time were heavily engaged in. The problem focused on the place and relationships between the newly formed or recently professionalized disciplines such as psychology, Erkenntnistheorie, physics, logic and philosophy. The prime metaphor used in discussions about the classificatory problem by British philosophers was a (...)
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  20. Gareth Fitzgerald (2009). Linguistic Intuitions (British Journal for the Philosophy of Science). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):123-160.score: 96.0
    This paper defends an orthodox model of the linguistic intuitions which form a central source of evidence for generative grammars. According to this orthodox conception, linguistic intuitions are the upshot of a system of grammatical competence as it interacts with performance systems for perceiving and articulating language. So conceived, probing speakers’ linguistic intuitions allows us to investigate the competence–performance distinction empirically, so as to determine the grammars that speakers are competent in. This model has been attacked by Michael Devitt in (...)
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  21. Branden Fitelson, The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.score: 96.0
    The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2002 53(4):539-563; doi:10.1093/bjps/53.4.539 © 2002 by British Society for the Philosophy of Science..
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  22. W. Mays (1960). History and Philosophy of Science in British Commonwealth Universities. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (43):192-211.score: 96.0
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  23. D. G. Harris & F. T. C. Harris (1963). Annual Conference of the British Society for the Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 14 (53):76-77.score: 96.0
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  24. Peter P. Nicholson (1990). The Political Philosophy of the British Idealists: Selected Studies. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    This book offers a reassessment of the political philosophy of the British Idealists, a group of once influential and now neglected nineteenth-century Hegelian philosophers, whose work has been much misunderstood. Peter Nicholson focuses on F. H. Bradley's idea of morality and moral philosophy; T. H. Green's theory of the Common Good, of the social nature of rights, of freedom, and of state interference; and Bernard Bosanquet's notorious theory of the General Will. By examining the arguments offered by the Idealists (...)
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  25. Peter Clark (2000). Referees for the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science(1 June 1998–1 June 2000). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):963-966.score: 96.0
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  26. G. E. Denyer (1960). Annual Conference of the British Society for the Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (41):86-88.score: 96.0
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  27. F. T. C. Harris & D. G. Harris (1964). Eighth Annual Conference of the British Society for the Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (57):83-85.score: 96.0
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  28. W. J. Mander (ed.) (2014). The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oup Oxford.score: 96.0
    This is the first full assessment of British philosophy in the 19th century. Specially written essays by leading experts explore the work of the key thinkers of this remarkable period in intellectual history, covering logic and scientific method, metaphysics, religion, positivism, the impact of Darwin, and ethical, social, and political theory.
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  29. Ronald W. Hepburn (1959). Bergson on Morality. By Frederick C. Copleston S.J., The Dawes Hicks Lecture on Philosophy, British Academy 1955. (From the Proceedings of the British Academy, Vol. XLI. London: Oxford University Press. Price 3s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 34 (131):372-.score: 96.0
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  30. Thomas L. Akehurst (2009). British Analytica Philosophy: The Politics of an Apolitical Culture. History of Political Thought 30 (4):678-692.score: 96.0
    There is a consensus that post-war British analytic philosophy was politically neutral. This view has been affirmed by the post-war analysts themselves, and by their critics. This paper argues that this consensus-view is false. Many central analytic philosophers claimed that their empirical philosophy had liberal outcomes, either through cultivating liberal habits of mind, or by revealing truths about the world that supported liberal conclusions. These beliefs were not subject to significant scrutiny or attempts at justification, but they do help (...)
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  31. Knud Haakonssen, Manfred Kuehn, Daniel Schulthess, M. A. Stewart, Alexander Broadie, Rebecca Copenhaver, John Glassford, Miguel A. Badia-Cabrera, Aaron Garrett & Atis Zakatistovs (2001). British Society for the History of Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):195.score: 96.0
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  32. Bertrand Russell (1956). The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (10):303-307.score: 96.0
    The basic hypothesis of cybernetics is that the chief mechanism of the central nervous system is one of negative feed-back. The field of study is not, however, restricted to feed-backs of the negative kind. Secondly, cybernetics makes the hypothesis that the negative feed-back mechanism explains purposive and adaptive behaviour. Broadly speaking what the cybernetic model does for our outlook is to make us understand how purposive behaviour can be manifested by a machine, for purposive can now be defined in terms (...)
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  33. David Danks (1950). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (3):77-91.score: 96.0
    A pervasive feature of the sciences, particularly the applied sciences, is an experimental focus on a few (often only one) possible causal connections. At the same time, scientists often advance and apply relatively broad models that incorporate many different causal mechanisms. We are naturally led to ask whether there are normative rules for integrating multiple local experimental conclusions into models covering many additional variables. In this paper, we provide a positive answer to this question by developing several inference rules that (...)
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  34. M. Atherton (1998). Stuart Brown (Ed.), British Philosophy and the Age of Enlightenment. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6:291-293.score: 96.0
     
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  35. Julian Baggini & Jeremy Stangroom (2008). New British Philosophy. The Interviews1. Organon F 15 (2):247-261.score: 96.0
    From popular introductions to biographies and television programmes, philosophy is everywhere. Many people even want to be philosophers, usually in the café or the pub. But what do real philosophers do? What are the big philosophical issues of today? Why do they matter? How did some our best philosophers get into philosophy in the first place? Read New British Philosophy and find out for the first time. Clear, engaging and designed for a general audience, sixteen fascinating interviews with some (...)
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  36. Stuart Brown (ed.) (1995). Routledge History of Philosophy Volume V: British Empiricism and the Enlightenment. Routledge.score: 96.0
    European philosophy from the late seventeenth century through most of the eighteenth is broadly conceived as `the Enlightenment', the period of empirical reaction to the great seventeenth century Rationalists. This volume begins with Herbert of Cherbury and the Cambridge Platonists and with Newton and the early English Enlightenment. Locke is a key figure in late chapters, as a result of his importance both in the development of British and Irish philosophy and because of his seminal influence in the Enlightenment (...)
     
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  37. Allan Franklin (1984). The British Society for the Philosophy of Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (4).score: 96.0
     
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  38. Elizabeth Valentine (2003). The Relation of Brentano to British Philosophy. Brentano Studien 10:263-268.score: 96.0
    Brentano's work has had, and has, its greatest influence in Austria, Germany, Poland and Italy, but its importance for an understanding of British analytical philosophy is increasingly being recognised.
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  39. Louise Braddock & Michael Lacewing (eds.) (2007). The Academic Face of Psychoanalysis: Papers in Philosophy, the Humanities, and the British Clinical Tradition. Routledge.score: 90.0
    Ever since Freud, psychoanalysts have explored the connections between psychoanalysis and literature and psychoanalysis and philosophy, while literary criticism, social science and philosophy have all reflected on and made use of ideas from psychoanalytic theory. The Academic Face of Psychoanalysis presents contributions from these fields and gives the reader an insight into different understandings and applications of psychoanalytic theory. This book comprises twelve contributions from experts in their fields covering philosophy, psychoanalysis, sociology and literary theory. The chapters are divided into (...)
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  40. Freny Mehta (ed.) (1980). The Scientific Consensus and Recent British Philosophy. Popular Prakashan.score: 90.0
    v. 1. Convergences of British schools of psychoanalysis, Piager's analysis, the Gestalt school and ethology, and ethics of British idealism vs logical realism and prescriptivism.
     
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  41. Alan Schwerin (ed.) (2011). Reason and Belief: Great Issues in Philosophy. Whittier Publications.score: 90.0
    This is a collection of brilliant and often lucid philosophical writings that will appeal to and engage students new to philosophy. Spanning the entire history of philosophy, the collection contains material from the Upanishads, Socrates, Aquinas, the British Empiricists, the Continental Philosophers and some of the leading analytic philosophers.
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  42. Wayne Waxman (2005). Kant and the Empiricists: Understanding Understanding. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    Wayne Waxman here presents an ambitious and comprehensive attempt to link the philosophers of what are known as the British Empiricists--Locke, Berkeley, and Hume--to the philosophy of German philosopher Immanuel Kant. Much has been written about all these thinkers, who are among the most influential figures in the Western tradition. Waxman argues that, contrary to conventional wisdom, Kant is actually the culmination of the British empiricist program and that he shares their methodological assumptions and basic convictions about human (...)
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  43. Michael Prince (1996). Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment: Theology, Aesthetics, and the Novel. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    This book offers the first full-length study of philosophical dialogue during the English Enlightenment. It explains why important philosophers - Shaftesbury, Mandeville, Berkeley and Hume - and innumerable minor translators, imitators and critics wrote in and about dialogue during the eighteenth century; and why, after Hume, philosophical dialogue either falls out of use or undergoes radical transformation. Philosophical Dialogue in the British Enlightenment describes the extended, heavily coded, and often belligerent debate about the nature and proper management of dialogue; (...)
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  44. A. J. Ayer (1968). British Empirical Philosophers. [New York]Simon and Schuster.score: 84.0
    The branch of philosophy to which these works belong is that which goes by the name of the Theory of Knowledge. And what the Theory of Knowledge is supposed ...
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  45. Robert J. Roth (1993). British Empiricism and American Pragmatism: New Directions and Neglected Arguments. Fordham University Press.score: 84.0
    This volume contributes to the remarkable resurgence in interest for American pragmatism and its proponents by focusing on the influence of British empiricism, ...
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  46. Peter N. Miller (1994). Defining the Common Good: Empire, Religion, and Philosophy in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    The theme of this book is the crisis of the early modern state in eighteenth-century Britain. The revolt of the North American colonies and the simultaneous demand for wider religious toleration at home challenged the principles of sovereignty and obligation that underpinned arguments about the character of the state. These were expressed in terms of the 'common good', 'necessity', and 'community' - concepts that came to the fore in early modern European political thought and which gave expression to the problem (...)
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  47. Anthony Kenny (ed.) (1986). Rationalism, Empiricism, and Idealism: British Academy Lectures on the History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    This collection includes papers by such leading thinkers as Michael Ayers, J.A. Passmore, Ian Hacking, Hide Ishiguro, G.E.M. Anscombe, David Pears, A.M. Quinton, and Richard Wollheim.
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  48. D. H. Mellor (2012). Mind, Meaning, and Reality: Essays in Philosophy. Oup Oxford.score: 84.0
    Mind, Meaning, and Reality presents fifteen philosophical papers in which D. H. Mellor explores some of the most intriguing questions in philosophy. These include: what determines what we think, and what we use language to mean; how that depends on what there is in the world and why there is only one universe; and the nature of time.
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  49. Ruth Savage (ed.) (2012). Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    They examine the currents of thought behind some of the most significant works in Western philosophy, including those by John Locke and David Hume.
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  50. Wolfgang Stegmüller (1969/1970). Main Currents in Contemporary German, British, and American Philosophy. Bloomington,Indiana University Press.score: 84.0
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