Search results for 'Philosophy, Confucian' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Zhongying Cheng & Justin Tiwald (eds.) (2011). Confucian Philosophy: Innovations and Transformations. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 78.0
    New work on Confucian philosophy, published as a supplement to the Journal of Chinese Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Hae-chʻang Chŏng & Hyŏng-jo Han (eds.) (1996). Confucian Philosophy in Korea. Academy of Korean Studies.score: 66.0
  3. Wu-chi Liu (1955/1979). A Short History of Confucian Philosophy. Hyperion Press.score: 66.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jinglin Li (2007). Philosophical Edification and Edificatory Philosophy: On the Basic Features of the Confucian Spirit. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):151-171.score: 57.0
    Edification 教化 is one of the central concepts of Confucianism. The metaphysical basis of the Confucian edification is the “philosophical theory” in the sense of rational humanism rather than the “religious doctrine” in the sense of pure faith. Confucianism did not create a system of ceremony and propriety owned by Confucians only. The system of ceremony and propriety on which Confucians depend to carry out their social edification is that of “rites and music,” the common life style of ancient (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Justin Tiwald (2011). Stephen C. Angle: Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):231-235.score: 51.0
    Review of Stephen C. Angle's Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Dermott J. Walsh (2011). The Confucian Roots of Zen No Kenkyū: Nishida's Debt to Wang Yang-Ming in the Search for a Philosophy of Praxis. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):361 - 372.score: 51.0
    This essay takes as its focus Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitar? (1870?1945) and his seminal first text, An Inquiry into the Good (or in Japanese zen no kenky?). Until now scholarship has taken for granted the predominantly Buddhist orientation of this text, centered around an analysis of the central concept of ?pure experience? (junsui keiken) as something Nishdia extrapolates from his early experience of Zen meditation. However, in this paper I will present an alternative and more accurate account of the origins (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ellen Y. Zhang (2010). Bai, Tongdong 白彤東, New Mission of an Old State: Classical Confucian Political Philosophy in a Contemporary and Comparative Context 舊邦新命: 古今中西參考下的古典儒家政治哲學. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):465-469.score: 51.0
    Bai, Tongdong 白彤東, New Mission of an Old State: Classical Confucian Political Philosophy in a Contemporary and Comparative Context 舊邦新命: 古今中西參考下的古典儒家政治哲學 Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9183-0 Authors Ellen Y. Zhang, Department of Religion and Philosophy, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 4.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Wonsuk Chang (2012). Ch'oe Han-Gi's Confucian Philosophy of Experience: New Names for Old Ways of Thinking. Philosophy East and West 62 (2):186-196.score: 51.0
    In this article, it is argued that Ch'oe Han-gi (1803-1877), a Korean Confucian scholar from the late Chosŏn, can be credited with finding the full philosophical significance of the notion of experience (kyŏnghŏm). At the same time, his philosophy of experience can be interpreted adequately in the context of not British empiricist but Confucian philosophical assumptions. There is both continuity and discontinuity in Ch'oe's relation to Confucian tradition. Unlike the Confucian traditionalist, he admitted that inherited knowledge (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Chung-ying Cheng (1997). On a Comprehensive Theory of Xing (Naturality) in Song-Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy: A Critical and Integrative Development. Philosophy East and West 47 (1):33-46.score: 51.0
    The question of xing has received much attention in the revival of Neo-Confucian philosophy (called Contemporary Neo-Confucianism) in present-day Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China and among scholars of Chinese philosophy in the United States. It also has much to do with a critical consciousness of both the difference and the affinity between the Chinese philosophy of man and morality and the contemporary Western philosophy of human existence and moral virtues. The study of this has great meaning for the development (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Shaojin Chai (2011). Liu, Xiaogan 劉笑敢 Et. Al., Eds., Chinese Philosophy and Culture : Confucian Studies of Ming-Qing Period 中國哲學與文化: 明清儒學研究. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):117-121.score: 51.0
    Liu, Xiaogan 劉笑敢 et. al., eds., Chinese Philosophy and Culture : Confucian Studies of Ming-Qing Period 中國哲學與文化: 明清儒學研究 Content Type Journal Article Pages 117-121 DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9203-0 Authors Shaojin Chai, Department of Political Science, University of Notre Dame, 217 O’Shaughnessay Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 10 Journal Issue Volume 10, Number 1.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Shu-hsien Liu (1971). The Religious Import of Confucian Philosophy: Its Traditional Outlook and Contemporary Significance. Philosophy East and West 21 (2):157-175.score: 51.0
    Confucianism has usually been regarded as a secular moral philosophy with no religious import at all. In china, However, Confucianism has been mentioned along with buddhism and taoism as one of the three religions (the so-Called san-Chiao) for centuries. This means that we must revise and broaden our traditional concept of religion. The confucian tradition certainly has its unique way of expressing its ultimate and therefore religious concern. The present essay is an attempt to uncover the religious import in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. P. -C. Lo (2010). A Confucian Philosophy of Medicine and Some Implications. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (4):466-476.score: 51.0
    Two crucial topics in the philosophy of medicine are the philosophy of nature and philosophical anthropology. In this essay I engage the philosophy of nature by exploring Anne Fagot-Largeault's study of norms in nature as a way of articulating a Confucian philosophy of medicine. I defend the Confucian position as a moderate naturalism.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Keqian Xu (2006). 論儒家哲學之“道”的實踐屬性與歷史屬性On the Practice and History Attributes of the “Dao” in the Confucian Philosophy. 學術論壇 Academic Forum, 2006 (11):32-34.score: 48.0
    The important feature of Dao as a philosophic category in early Confucian philosophy is its prominent practical and historical properties, which make it different from those western metaphysic categories. Confucianism emphasizes that the Dao can not be separated with the practice and the history of human being, thus the Tao should be explored in peoples’ social activities and history. They believe that the Tao only lives in the historical tradition and can only be demonstrated by the narrative of history. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen C. Angle (2009). Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    The book's significance is two-fold: it argues for a new stage in the development of contemporary Confucian philosophy, and it demonstrates the value to Western ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Keqian Xu (2012). A Synthetic Comprehension of the Way of Zhong in Early Confucian Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):422-438.score: 48.0
    Zhong 中 is a very important philosophical concept in early Confucianism. Both the received ancient Confucian classics and the newly discovered ancient bamboo manuscripts tell us that adhering to the principle of zhong was an important charge that had been transmitted and inherited by early ancient Chinese political leaders from generation to generation. Confucius and his followers adopted the concept of zhong and further developed it into a sophisticated doctrine, which is usually called zhongdao 中道 (the Way of zhong) (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Kathleen Higgins (1980). Music in Confucian and Neo-Confucian Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (4):433-451.score: 48.0
    This article proposes to discuss the role of music within confucian philosophy as a whole and within neo-Confucian philosophy in particular. The discussion includes a consideration of the construction of chinese music; philosophical correlations drawn between musical elements and features of both macrocosm and microcosm; musical aesthetics in the confucian and neo-Confucian philosophical systems; and affinities between the nature of music and the broader outlook of confucian and neo-Confucian philosophy. The suggestion is made that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Bongrae Seok (2012). Embodied Moral Psychology and Confucian Philosophy. Lexington Books.score: 48.0
    Confucian philosophy provides insightful discussions and examples of how the body serves the moral mind not only causally but also constitutionally. This book explores this topic.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Keqian Xu (2013). Zhongtaology: A Confucian Way of Philosophical Thinking and Moral Life. In School of Philosophy (ed.), XXIII World Congress of Philosophy: Philosophy as Inquiry and Way of Life(Abstract). University of Athens.score: 48.0
    Due to the differences of languages, “ontology” in its original Western sense had not been conceptualized in ancient China. The most prominent and unique feature of Confucian philosophy in early ancient China is “Zhongtaology” instead of “ontology”. Zhongtaology is the philosophical inquiring for the way of “Zhong”, which is based on all the primordially related semantic meanings embodied in the Chinese character “zhong”. Zhongtaological philosophy indicates an association between human beings and their world, a coincidence between subjectivity and objectivity, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Weixi Hu (2007). On Confucian Communitarianism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (4):475-487.score: 45.0
    As a social and political thought, communitarian ideas appeared in the Pre-Qin Confucianism. By the Song Dynasty, it had become a systematic theory, namely, the learning of the “four books.” As a social and political theory, not only can Confucian communitarianism contribute to Western liberalism, but it can also be an intellectual resource for the development of democracy in East Asian countries and regions. The future of the Confucian communitarianism lies in its critique of itself and its discourse (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alana Maurushat (2008). The Benevolent Health Worm : Comparing Western Human Rights-Based Ethics and Confucian Duty-Based Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):11-25.score: 45.0
    Censorship in the area of public health has become increasingly important in many parts of the world for a number of reasons. Groups with vested interest in public health policy are motivated to censor material. As governments, corporations, and organizations champion competing visions of public health issues, the more incentive there may be to censor. This is true in a number of circumstances: curtailing access to information regarding the health and welfare of soldiers in the Kuwait and Iraq wars, poor (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Deborah A. Sommer (2014). Review of Makeham, John, Ed., Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Post Print Version). [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):1-5.score: 45.0
    This volume includes nineteen articles by scholars from Asia, North America, and Europe on Chinese thinkers from the eleventh to the eighteenth centuries. Included here are intellectual biographies of literati such as Zhou Dunyi, the Cheng brothers, Zhu Xi, Zhang Shi, Hu Hong, Wang Yangming, and Dai Zhen. Essays are arranged chronologically, and most begin with a biographical sketch of their subject. They provide variety rather than uniformity of approach, but all in all these essays are remarkably rich and offer (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Shuxian Liu (2003). Essentials of Contemporary Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Praeger.score: 45.0
    This is the first book in English to study the thoughts of Contemporary Neo-Confucian philosophers in great depth.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Guo Qiyong (2013). On Confucian Political Philosophy and Its Theory of Justice. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (1):53-75.score: 45.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. L. I. Jinglin (2007). Philosophical Edifi Cation and Edifi Catory Philosophy: On the Basic Features of the Confucian Spirit. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):151-171.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. X. U. Keqian (2012). A Synthetic Comprehension of the Way of Zhong in Early Confucian Philosophy. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (3):422-438.score: 45.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Bryan W. Van Norden (2007). Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    In this book, Bryan W. Van Norden examines early Confucianism as a form of virtue ethics and Mohism, an anti-Confucian movement, as a version of consequentialism. The philosophical methodology is analytic, in that the emphasis is on clear exegesis of the texts and a critical examination of the philosophical arguments proposed by each side. Van Norden shows that Confucianism, while similar to Aristotelianism in being a form of virtue ethics, offers different conceptions of “the good life,” the virtues, human (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. A. S. Cua (2005). Human Nature, Ritual, and History: Studies in Xunzi and Chinese Philosophy. The Catholic University of America Press.score: 42.0
    In this volume, distinguished philosopher Antonio S. Cua offers a collection of original studies on Xunzi, a leading classical Confucian thinker, and on other ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Kurtis G. Hagen, Confucian Constructivism: A Reconstruction and Application of the Philosophy of Xunzi.score: 42.0
    In Part 1, I offer a "constructivist" interpretation of Xunzi's philosophy. On the constructivist view, there is no privileged description of the world. Concepts, categories, and norms as social constructs help us effectively manage our way through the world, rather than reveal or express univocal knowledge of it. In the opening chapter, I argue that dao should be understood as open ended and that Xunzi's worldview allows for a plurality of legitimate daos-at least at the theoretical level. Chapter Two discusses (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Gad C. Isay (2009). A Humanist Synthesis of Memory, Language, and Emotions: Qian Mu's Interpretation of Confucian Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):425-437.score: 42.0
    While Qian Mu intentionally avoided systematic philosophical arguments, his references to memory, language, and emotions, as expressed in a book he wrote in 1948, were suggestive of new interpretations of traditional Chinese, and especially Confucian, ideas such as human autonomy, mind, human nature, morality, immortality, and spirituality. The foremost contribution of Qian’s humanist synthesis rests in its articulation of the idea of the person. Across the context of memory, language, and emotions, the tiyong dynamics of mind and human nature (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Lai Chen (2009). Tradition and Modernity: A Humanist View. Brill.score: 42.0
    Retrospect and prospect for contemporary Chinese thought -- Resolving the tension between tradition and modernity : reflections on the May Fourth cultural tide -- The May Fourth tide and modernity -- Radicalism in the cultural movement of the twentieth century -- Modern Chinese culture and the difficulties of Confucian learning -- Liang Shuming's early view of Oriental and Western culture -- The establishment and development of Feng Youlan's view of culture -- A reflection on the new school of principle (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Thomas A. Wilson (1995). Genealogy of the Way: The Construction and Uses of the Confucian Tradition in Late Imperial China. Stanford University Press.score: 42.0
    Beginning in the Southern Sung, one Confucian sect gradually came to dominate literati culture and, by the Ming dynasty, was canonized as state orthodoxy. This book is a historical and textual critique of the process by which claims to exclusive possession of the truth came to serve power. The author analyzes the formation of the Confucian canon and its role in the civil service examinations, the enshrinement of worthies in the Confucian temple, and the emergence of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jui-pʻing Fan (ed.) (1999). Confucian Bioethics. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 42.0
    This volume explores Confucian views regarding the human body, health, virtue, suffering, suicide, euthanasia, `human drugs,' human experimentation, and justice in health care distribution. These views are rooted in Confucian metaphysical, cosmological, and moral convictions, which stand in contrast to modern Western liberal perspectives in a number of important ways. In the contemporary world, a wide variety of different moral traditions flourish; there is real moral diversity. Given this circumstance, difficult and even painful ethical conflicts often occur between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jeffrey L. Richey (ed.) (2008). Teaching Confucianism. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,' teachers and scholars of religious studies and theology will be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Donald N. Blakeley (2001). Neo-Confucian Cosmology, Virtue Ethics, and Environmental Philosophy. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):37-49.score: 42.0
    This paper explores the extent to which the Confucian concept of ren (humaneness) has application in ways that are comparable tocontemporary versions of environmental virtue ethics. I argue that the accounts of self-cultivation that are developed in major texts of the Confucian tradition have important direct implications for environmental thinking that even the Neo-Confucians do not seriously entertain.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. On-cho Ng (2007). Toward a Hermeneutic Turn in Chinese Philosophy: Western Theory, Confucian Tradition, and Cheng Chung-Ying's Onto-Hermeneutics. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):383-395.score: 42.0
    Chung-ying’s project of onto-hermeneutics draws in order to shed light on the relations between ontology and epistemology in the hermeneutic act. In the process, not only will we be thinking with Cheng and some Western hermeneutic theorists, but we will also be thinking through history by examining the Confucian act of reading. To the extent that any hermeneutic exercise, in accordance with Cheng’s construal, cannot merely be a disembodied act of theoretical knowing but is also moral effort that entails (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Sandra A. Wawrytko (2013). Sedimentation in Chinese Aesthetics and Epistemology: A Buddhist Expansion of Confucian Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):473-492.score: 42.0
    Li Zehou's theory of sedimentation seeks to explain the uniqueness of the human species through its use of tools, both physical and cognitive, leading to cultures grounded in aesthetic taste and the prospect of suprabiological beings. However, the very sedimentation that constructs human culture can stagnate into obstructing sediment. Buddhist philosophy offers an epistemology of desedimentation that avoids attachment to cultural sediment without summarily rejecting its potential usefulness. More specifically, Buddhist “wisdom embracing all species” allows us to recognize our interconnection (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. John H. Berthrong (1998). Transformations of the Confucian Way. Westview Press.score: 42.0
    From its beginnings, Confucianism has vibrantly taught that each person is able to find the Way individually in service to the community and the world. For over 2,600 years, Confucianism has sustained a continual process of transformation and growth. In this comprehensive new work, John Berthrong examines the vitality and expansion of the Confucian tradition throughout East Asia and into the entire modern world.Confucianism has been credited with being the dominant social and intellectual force shaping the enduring civilizations of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Toshihiko Izutsu (1995). Celestial Journey: Far Eastern Ways of Thinking: Comparative Studies in Buddhist, Taoist, & Confucian Philosophy. White Cloud Press.score: 42.0
  39. Mencius (2006). A Basic Mencius: The Wisdom and Advice of China's Second Sage. Long River Press.score: 42.0
    Mencius is known to history as the "other" great philosopher from China. In actuality, Mencius was highly influential as one of the greatest exponents of Confucian thought, and is credited with bringing Confucianism back from the brink of near extinction in China and cementing the Confucian tradition as the major societal and ethical school of philosophy in Chinese civilization. This book features some of the greatest teachings of Mencius, with each quote paired with a historical anecdote on the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Critique From A. Neo-Confucian Point (2008). Analysis of Searle's Philosophy of Mind and Critique From a Neo-Confucian Point of View Chung-Ying Cheng. In Bo Mou (ed.), Searle's Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement. Brill. 33.score: 42.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Chen Ming (2009). Modernity and Confucian Political Philosophy in a Globalizing World. Diogenes 56 (1):94-108.score: 39.0
    The scholarship of Confucianism in China is in the process of restoration. Its historical missions are two-fold. It should preserve Chinese national characters and promote China’s modernization. These objectives are partly in conflict with each other. To realize the former objective, it is necessary to stress a historical continuity and consistency, to re-examine and justify the preservation of classical Confucian ideas and values in order to provide spiritual support for Chinese cultural identity and social cohesion. As to the latter (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Anne D. Birdwhistell (1998). Response to Matthew Levy's Review of "Li Yong (1627-1705) and Epistemological Dimensions of Confucian Philosophy". [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 48 (1):164 - 165.score: 39.0
  43. John H. Berthrong, Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 39.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kai-wing Chow (1993). Ritual, Cosmology, and Ontology: Chang Tsai's Moral Philosophy and Neo-Confucian Ethics. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):201-228.score: 39.0
  45. Weiming Tu (1985). Confucian Thought: Selfhood as Creative Transformation. State University of New York Press.score: 39.0
    I. The "Moral Universal" from the Perspectives of East Asian Thought jl\ defining characteristic of East Asian thought is the widely accepted proposition ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Hon Tze-ki (2009). Liu, Shuxian 劉述先, on the Three Great Epochs of Confucian Philosophy 論儒家哲學的三個大時代. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):471-473.score: 39.0
  47. Siu-Chi Huang (1974). The Concept of T'ai-Chi (Supreme Ultimate) in Sung Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 1 (3-4):275-294.score: 39.0
  48. Chung-ying Cheng (2005). Confucian Ren and Deweyan Experience: A Review Essay on Joseph Grange's John Dewey, Confucius, and the Global Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (4):641–648.score: 39.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Dennis M. Ahern (1980). An Equivocation in Confucian Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (2):175-185.score: 39.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Thorian R. Harris (2012). Sagehood: The Contemporary Significance of Neo-Confucian Philosophy (Review). Philosophy East and West 62 (3):392-397.score: 39.0
1 — 50 / 1000