Search results for 'Philosophy, Maori' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.) (1992). Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    What is sovereignty? Was it ceded to the Crown in the Treaty of Waitangi? If land was unjustly confiscated over a century ago, should it be returned? Is an ecosystem valuable in itself, or only because of its value to people? Does a property right entail a right to destroy? Can collectives (such as tribes) bear moral responsibility? Do they have moral rights? If so, what are the implications for the justice system? These questions are essentially philosophical, yet all thoughtful (...)
     
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  2. John Patterson (2000). People of the Land: A Pacific Philosophy. Dunmore Press.score: 78.0
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  3. Georgina Stewart (2013). Kaupapa Māori, Philosophy and Schools. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-6.score: 78.0
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  4. Moana Jackson (1992). The Treaty and the Word: The Colonization of Māori Philosophy. In Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.), Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press. 1--10.score: 72.0
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  5. Georgina Stewart (2011). The Extra Strand of the Māori Science Curriculum. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1175-1182.score: 60.0
    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Pūtaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an ‘extra strand’ covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this strand be taught by means of narratives (i.e. using ‘narrative pedagogy’) in order to avoid a superficial didacticism that succumbs to the traditional notion of science curriculum content as (...)
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  6. A. Pablo Iannone (2001). Dictionary of World Philosophy. Routledge.score: 54.0
    This is the first comprehensive reference to the vast field of world philosophy. The Dictionary covers all the major subfields of the discipline, with entries drawn from West African, Arabic, Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Jewish, Korean, Latin American, Maori, and Native American philosophy--including Nahua philosophy, a previously unexplored, but key instance of Pre-Hispanic thought. Entries include: * abazimu * abortion * Advaita * afrocentricity * age of the world * artificial life * baskets of knowledge * bhakti body *brotherhood * (...)
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  7. Elizabeth Rata (2012). Theoretical Claims and Empirical Evidence in Maori Education Discourse. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1060-1072.score: 42.0
    Post-Marxist critical sociology of education has influenced the development of indigenous (‘kaupapa’) Maori educational theory and research. Its effects are examined in four claims made for Maori education by indigenous theorists. The claims are: indigenous kaupapa Maori education is a revolutionary initiative; it is a cultural solution to Maori educational under-achievement; it has reversed the decline of the Maori language; it provides a valid educational alternative for an ethnically and culturally distinctive population. The analysis suggests (...)
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  8. Georgina Stewart (2005). Mäori in the Science Curriculum: Developments and Possibilities. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):851–870.score: 36.0
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  9. Georgina Stewart (2011). Science in the Māori-Medium Curriculum: Assessment of Policy Outcomes in Pūtaiao Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):724-741.score: 30.0
    This second research paper on science education in Māori-medium school contexts complements an earlier article published in this journal (Stewart, 2005). Science and science education are related domains in society and in state schooling in which there have always been particularly large discrepancies in participation and achievement by Māori. In 1995 a Kaupapa Māori analysis of this situation challenged New Zealand science education academics to deal with ‘the Māori crisis’ within science education. Recent NCEA results suggest Pūtaiao (Māori-medium Science) education, (...)
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  10. Carl Te Hira Mika (2012). Overcoming 'Being' in Favour of Knowledge: The Fixing Effect of 'Mātauranga'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1080-1092.score: 30.0
    It is common to hear Māori discuss primordial states of Being, yet in colonisation those very central beliefs are forced into weaker utterances. In this process those utterances merely conform to a colonised agenda. ‘Mātauranga’, a tidy term that overwhelmingly refers to an epistemological knowing of the world, colludes nicely with its English equivalent, ‘knowledge’, to further colonise those core contemplations of Being. Its plausibility relies on an orderly regard of things in the world. In education, historical and current practices (...)
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  11. Andrew Sharp (1999). 'What If Value and Rights Lie Foundationally in Groups?' The Maori Case. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):1-28.score: 30.0
    Liberal writers share the intuition that the fundamental moral particle is the human individual, not the group. In this paper, I adopt the opposing intuition which many, including the indigenous Maori of New Zealand, say they feel: that it is the group that is fundamental, rather than the individual. I attempt to work out the doctrine which results from that intuition and call it ?group foundationalism?. I then seek to explore the tenability of group foundationalism, not from the (...)
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  12. Roy W. Perrett & John Patterson (1991). Virtue Ethics and Maori Ethics. Philosophy East and West 41 (2):185-202.score: 24.0
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  13. Roy W. Perrett (2000). Indigenous Language Rights and Political Theory: The Case of Te Reo Māori. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (3):405 – 417.score: 24.0
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  14. I. L. G. Sutherland (1927). Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology: A Preliminary Survey, I. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81 – 93.score: 24.0
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  15. Andrew Gibbons (2008). Child-Rearing Practices and Expert Identities: A Tale of Two Interventions. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):747-757.score: 24.0
    Paul Smeyers' keynote address to the PESA 2007 Conference, 'The Entrepreneurial Self and Informal Education: On government intervention and the discourse of experts' provides a timely call for questioning the governing of the family. This paper draws upon Smeyers' key concerns to explore both historical and contemporary trends in clustering government agencies, under the guidance of child development experts. The guidance of two expert groups is problematised, with particular attention to an absence of commitment to Māori perspectives of education and (...)
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  16. W. S. Dale (1931). The Maori—a Problem in Social Assimilation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):203 – 213.score: 24.0
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  17. James D. Marshall (2000). Technology, Education and Indigenous Peoples: The Case of Maori. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (1):119–131.score: 24.0
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  18. Cherryl Waerea‐I.‐Te‐Rangi Smith (2000). Straying Beyond the Boundaries of Belief: Maori Epistemologies Inside the Curriculum. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (1):43–51.score: 24.0
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  19. Pei Te Hurinui (2013). King Potatau: An Account of the Life of Potatau Te Wherowhero, the First Maori King. Philosophy East and West 63 (2).score: 24.0
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  20. I. L. G. Sutherland (1927). Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology: A Preliminary Survey, II. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186 – 201.score: 24.0
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  21. Sharp Andrew (2000). What If Value and Rights Lie Foundationally in Groups? The Māori Case. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):22-23.score: 24.0
  22. J. R. Clammer, Sylvie Poirier & Eric Schwimmer (eds.) (2004). Figured Worlds: Ontological Obstacles in Intercultural Relations. University of Toronto Press.score: 18.0
    This collection begins its rich analytical investigation by describing how people Australian Aborigines, New Zealand Maori, Japanese, and Africans first learn the figured worlds of their own culture, made up of sensations, affirmations and ...
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  23. Andrew Dawson, Jennifer Lorna Hockey & Andrew H. Dawson (eds.) (1997). After Writing Culture: Epistemology and Praxis in Contemporary Anthropology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Anthropologists now openly acknowledge that social anthropology can no longer fulfill its traditional aim of providing holistic, objective representations of people of "exotic" cultures. After Writing Culture asks what theoretical and practical role contemporary anthropology can play in our increasingly unpredictable and complex world. With fourteen articles written by well-known anthropologists, the work explores some of the directions in which contemporary anthropology is moving, following the questions raised by the "writing culture" debates of the 1980s. Some of the chapters cover: (...)
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  24. Simone Drichel (2008). The Time of Hybridity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (6):587-615.score: 12.0
    Homi Bhabha's idea of hybridity is one of postcolonialism's most keenly debated — and most widely misunderstood — concepts. My article provides some elucidation in the increasingly reductive debates over hybridity in postcolonial studies, suggesting that what is commonly overlooked in these debates is hybridity's complex relationship to temporality. I suggest that this relationship is not given the credit it deserves often enough, resulting in skewed discussions of hybridity as simply (and mistakenly) another form of syncretism. In focusing on the (...)
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  25. John Patterson (2000). Mana: Yin and Yang. Philosophy East and West 50 (2):229-241.score: 12.0
    We can gain standing or mana in the world through cooperation (yin mana) or through competition (yang mana). Drawing on both Maori and Daoist ideas, the way of yin mana is explored, whereby all parties can gain through new and meaningful participatory activities.
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  26. Richard Fardon (ed.) (1995). Counterworks: Managing the Diversity of Knowledge. Routledge.score: 6.0
    Globalization is often described as the spread of western culture to other parts of the world. How accurate is the depiction of "cultural" flow? In Counterworks , ten anthropologists examine the ways in which global processes have affected particular localities where they have carried out research. They challenge the validity of anthropological concepts of culture in the light of the pervasive connections which exist between local and global factors everywhere. Rather than assuming that the world is culturally diverse, this book (...)
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