Search results for 'Philosophy, Medieval Bibliography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Noel Harold Kaylor (1992). The Medieval Consolation of Philosophy: An Annotated Bibliography. Garland Pub..
     
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  2. Stephen F. Brown (2007). Historical Dictionary of Medieval Philosophy and Theology. Scarecrow Press.
    The Middle Ages is often viewed as a period of low intellectual achievement. The name itself refers to the time between the high philosophical and literary accomplishments of the Greco-Roman world and the technological advances that were achieved and philosophical and theological alternatives that were formulated in the modern world that followed. However, having produced such great philosophers as Anselm, Peter Abelard, John Duns Scotus, William of Ockham, Peter Lombard, and the towering Thomas Aquinas, it hardly seems fair to label (...)
     
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  3. Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise (...)
     
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  4. Graham Oppy & N. N. Trakakis (eds.) (2009). The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Five Volume Set: V.1 Ancient Philosophy and Religion: V.2 Medieval Philosophy and Religion: V.3 Early Modern Philosophy and Religion: V.4 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy and Religion: V.5 Twentieth-Century Philosophy and Religion. [REVIEW] Routledge.
    An international team of over 100 leading scholars has been brought together to provide authoritative exposition of how history's most important philosophical thinkers - fron antiquity to the present day - have sought to analyse the concepts and tenets central to Western religious belief, especially Christianity. Divided, chronologically, into five volumes, _The History of Western Philosophy of Religion_ is designed to be accessible to a wide range of readers, from the scholar looking for original insight and the latest research findings (...)
     
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  5.  10
    George Bosworth Burch (1971). Early Medieval Philosophy. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
    John Scotus Erigena.--Anselm of Canterbury.--Peter Abelard.--Bernard of Clairvaux.--Isaac of Stella.--Bibliography (p. [129]-136).
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  6.  1
    Stephen F. Brown & Juan Carlos Flores (2010). The a to Z of Medieval Philosophy and Theology. Scarecrow Press.
    Examining the influence of ancient Greek philosophy, as well as of the Arabian and Hebrew scholars who transmitted it, The A to Z of Medieval Philosophy and Theology presents the philosophy of the Christian West from the 9th to the early 17th century. This is accomplished through a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, a bibliography, and hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on the philosophers, concepts, issues, institutions, and events, making this an important reference for the study of the progression (...)
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  7. Robert Pasnau & Christina van Dyke (eds.) (2014). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy 2 Volume Paperback Boxed Set. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise (...)
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  8. Robert Pasnau & Christina van Dyke (eds.) (2014). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise (...)
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  9.  21
    Colette Sirat (1990). A History of Jewish Philosophy in the Middle Ages. Editions De La Maison des Sciences De L'Homme.
    This book surveys the vast body of medieval Jewish philosophy, devoting ample discussion to major figures such as Saadiah Gaon, Maimonides, Abraham Ibn Ezra, Judah Halevi, Abraham Ibn Daoud, and Gersonides, as well as presenting the ancillary texts of lesser known authors. Sirat quotes little-known texts, providing commentary and situating them within their historical and philosophical contexts. A comprehensive bibliography directs the reader to the texts themselves and to recent studies.
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  10.  33
    Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, Herbert (...)
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  11.  13
    Oliver Leaman (1985). An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an introduction to debates in philosophy within the medieval Islamic world. It discusses a number of themes which were controversial within the philosophical community of that period: the creation of the world out of nothing, immortality, resurrection, the nature of ethics, and the relationship between natural and religious law. The author provides an account of the arguments of Farabi, Avicenna, Ghazali, Averroes and Maimonides on these and related topics. His argument takes into account the significance of (...)
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  12.  1
    Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny, Jan Pinborg & Eleonore Stump (1984). The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Disintegration of Scholasticism, 1100-1600. Journal of Philosophy 81 (3):150-156.
    This 1982 book is a history of the great age of scholastism from Abelard to the rejection of Aristotelianism in the Renaissance, combining the highest standards of medieval scholarship with a respect for the interests and insights of contemporary philosophers, particularly those working in the analytic tradition. The volume follows on chronologically from The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, though it does not continue the histories of Greek and Islamic philosophy but concentrates on the (...)
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  13.  9
    Tobias Hoffmann (ed.) (2012). A Companion to Angels in Medieval Philosophy. Brill.
    This book studies medieval theories of angelology insofar as they made groundbreaking contributions to medieval philosophy. -/- The discussion of angels, made famous by the humanist caricature of ‘how many angels can dance on the head of a pin’, was nevertheless a crucial one in medieval philosophical debates. All scholastic masters pronounced themselves on angelology, if only in their Sentence commentaries. The questions concerning angelic cognition, speech, free decision, movement, etc. were springboards for profound philosophical discussions that (...)
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  14.  35
    Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement and Origen (...)
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  15.  20
    Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, (...)
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  16. Monika Asztalos, John Emery Murdoch, Ilkka Niiniluoto & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy (1990). Knowledge and the Sciences in Medieval Philosophy. Yliopistopaino.
     
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  17. Jan Aertsen (1996). Medieval Philosophy and the Transcendentals: The Case of Thomas Aquinas. E.J. Brill.
    Students of Thomas Aquinas have so far lacked a comprehensive study of his doctrine of the transcendentals. This volume fills this lacuna, showing the fundamental character of the notions of being, one, true and good for his thought. The book inquires into the beginnings of the doctrine in the thirteenth century and explains the relation of the transcendental way of thought to Aquinas's conception of metaphysics. It analyzes 'Being', 'One', 'True', 'Good' and 'Beautiful' individually and discusses their importance for the (...)
     
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  18.  13
    Ralph Lerner (1963). Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook. Ithaca, N.Y.,Cornell University Press.
    For students of political philosophy, the history of religion, and medieval civilization, this book provides a rich storehouse of medieval thought drawn from Latin, Hebrew, and Arabic sources.
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  19.  16
    Julius R. Weinberg (1964). A Short History of Medieval Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
    In this sketch of medieval philosophy I hope to show, more by illustration than by explicit argument, that philosophy did exist in the period from the first ...
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  20.  3
    Henry Bett (1925). Johannes Scotus Erigena: A Study in Mediaeval Philosophy. Hyperion Press.
    Originally published in 1925, this book provides an overview of the philosophy of Johannes Scotus Erigena. Bett explains Erigena's thinking as well as the influence he had over later philosophers, despite the fact that his writings were banned by the Pope. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in medieval philosophy and Erigena's philosophy in particular.
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  21. Stephen F. Brown & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy (1998). Meeting of the Minds the Relations Between Medieval and Classical Modern European Philosophy : Acts of the International Colloquium Held at Boston College, June 14-16, 1996 Organized by the Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale. [REVIEW]
     
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  22.  26
    Frederick Charles Copleston (1952). Medieval Philosophy: An Introduction. Dover Publications.
    Classic introduction provides readers with insightful, accessible survey of major philosophical trends and thinkers of the Middle Ages--from the thought of Thomas Aquinas and the Averroists to Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. "A better conspectus of medieval philosophy than this would be difficult to conceive ... a notable achievement." The Tablet (London).
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  23. John N. Deely (2010). Medieval Philosophy Redefined: The Development of Cenoscopic Science, Ad 354 to 1644 (From the Birth of Augustine to the Death of Poinsot). [REVIEW] University of Scranton Press.
    Medieval philosophy redefined: the Latin age, c. 400-1635 -- The geography of the Latin age -- The fading light of antiquity: Neoplatonism and the tree of Porphyry, c. 3rd-5th cent. AD -- Founding fathers of the Latin Age: Augustine ([d.] 430) and Boethius ([d.] c. 525) -- The five centuries of darkness, c. 525-1025 -- Dawning of the main development : Anselm ([d.] 1109), Abaelard ([d.] 1142), Lombard ([d.] 1160) -- Enter Aristotle, c. 1150 -- Albert ([d.] 1280) and (...)
     
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  24.  5
    Brian Duignan (ed.) (2011). Medieval Philosophy: From 500 to 1500 Ce. Britannica Educational Pub..
    Presents the history of medieval philosophy and includes profiles of notable philosophers, Jewish and Arabic medieval philsophy, and the age of the schoolmen.
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  25.  21
    Robert Eisen (2004). The Book of Job in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Medieval Jewish philosophers have been studied extensively by modern scholars, but even though their philosophical thinking was often shaped by their interpretation of the Bible, relatively little attention has been paid to them as biblical interpreters. In this study, Robert Eisen breaks new ground by analyzing how six medieval Jewish philosophers approached the Book of Job. These thinkers covered are Saadiah Gaon, Moses Maimonides, Samuel ibn Tibbon, Zerahiah Hen, Gersonides, and Simon ben Zemah Duran. Eisen explores each philosopher's (...)
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  26. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    From the ninth to the fifteenth centuries Jewish thinkers living in Islamic and Christian lands philosophized about Judaism. Influenced first by Islamic theological speculation and the great philosophers of classical antiquity, and then in the late medieval period by Christian Scholasticism, Jewish philosophers and scientists reflected on the nature of language about God, the scope and limits of human understanding, the eternity or createdness of the world, prophecy and divine providence, the possibility of human freedom, and the relationship between (...)
     
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  27.  22
    Robert Hammond (1947). The Philosophy of Alfarabi and its Influence on Medieval Thought. New York, Hobson Book Press.
    PREFACE HE purpose of this book is to present, in as brief and systematic a way, the whole philosophy of Alfarabi and the influence it exerted on Medieval ...
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  28.  41
    John Inglis (ed.) (2003). Medieval Philosophy and the Classical Tradition in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Routledgecurzon.
    The Islamic philosophical tradition was the privileged site for the study and continuation of the Classical philosophical tradition in the Middle Ages. An initial chapter on the history of Islamic philosophy sets the stage for sixteen articles on issues across the Islamic, Jewish and Christian traditions. The goal is to see the Islamic tradition in its own richness and complexity as the context of much Jewish intellectual work. Taken together, these two traditions provide the wider context to which Latin Christian (...)
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  29.  20
    John Inglis (1998). Spheres of Philosophical Inquiry and the Historiography of Medieval Philosophy. Brill.
    This volume continues this discussion with particular reference to medieval philosophy.Inglis shows that the modern historiography of medieval philosophy had ...
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  30.  17
    Anthony Kenny (2005). Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Sir Anthony Kenny here continues his fascinating account of the history of philosophy, focusing on the thousand-year-long medieval period. This is the second volume of a four-book set in which Kenny will unfold a magisterial new history of Western philosophy, the first major single-author history of philosophy to appear in decades. In this volume, Kenny takes us on a fascinating tour through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders (...)
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  31.  32
    John Marenbon (1987). Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350): An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Later Medieval Philosophy (1150-1350) provides an introduction to philosophy in the Latin West between 1150 and 1350. Part I describes the medieval thinker's intellectual and historical context, by examining the structure of courses in the medieval universities, the methods of teaching, the forms of written work, and the translation and availability of ancient Greek, Arab, and Jewish philosophical texts. Part II examines the nature of intellectual knowledge by explaining the arguments given by Aristotle, his antique commentators, and (...)
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  32.  5
    John Marenbon (ed.) (1998). Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.
    Combining the latest scholarship with fresh perspectives on this complex and rapidly changing area of research, this work considers the rich traditions of medieval Arab, Jewish and Latin philosophy. Experts in the field provide comprehensive analyses of the key areas of medieval philosophy and its most influential figures, including: Avicenna, Averroes, Maimonides, Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Grosseteste, Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, Peter Aureoli, William of Ockham, Wyclif, Suarez, and the enormous and enduring influence of Boethius on the (...)
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  33.  30
    John Marenbon (2006). Medieval Philosophy: An Historical and Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    Introduction to Medieval Philosophy combines and updates the scholarship of the two highly successful volumes Early Medieval Philosophy (1983) and Late Medieval Philosoph y (1986) in a single, reliable, and comprehensive text on the history of medieval philosophy. John Marenbon discusses the main philosophers and ideas within the social and intellectual contexts of the time, and the most important concepts in medieval philosophy. Straightforward in arrangement, wide in scope, and clear in style, this is the (...)
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  34.  13
    Jukka Mikkonen (ed.) (2008). Philosophy of Literature by Finnish Researchers: A Bibliography 1968-2008. Filosofia.Fi.
    This bibliography aims to gather together studies in the philosophy of literature by Finnish researchers. It consists of articles and monographs which treat i) philosophical literary theory, ii) philosophical literature, or iii) literary philosophy and philosophers’ use of literary devices. The bibliography, collected by requests of publication data and from several Finnish publication databases, is not intended inclusive. Nevertheless, it is being throughout updated, and all kinds of suggestions, updates and corrections are most welcome.
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  35. Daniel Rynhold (2009). An Introduction to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. I.B. Tauris.
    Introduction : what is medieval Jewish philosophy? -- The existence of God -- God and creation -- Divine attributes -- Prophecy -- Rationalising the commandments -- Freewill and omniscience -- The good life -- The bad life.
     
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  36. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
     
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  37. Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index (2009). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW] In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill
     
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  38. Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index (2009). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW] In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill
     
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  39. Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index (2009). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW] In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill
     
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  40. Farewell to the Twentieth Century: Nussbaum Glossary of Philosophical Terms Selected Bibliography Index (2009). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction1. The Pre-Socratic Philosophers: Sixth and Fifth Centuries B.C.E. Thales / Anaximander / Anaximenes / Pythagoras / Xenophanes / Heraclitus / Parmenides / Zeno / Empedocles / Anaxagoras / Leucippus and Democritus 2. The Athenian Period: Fifth and Fourth Centuries B.C.E. The Sophists: Protagoras, Gorgias, Thrasymachus, Callicles and Critias / Socrates / Plato / Aristotle 3. The Hellenistic and Roman Periods: Fourth Century B.C.E Through Fourth Century C.E. Epicureanism / Stoicism / Skepticism / neoPlatonism 4. Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy: Fifth Through Fifteenth Centuries Saint Augustine / the Encyclopediasts / John Scotus Eriugena / Saint Anselm / Muslim and Jewish Philosophies: Averroës, Maimonides / the Problem of Faith and Reason / the Problem of the Universals / Saint Thomas Aquinas / William of Ockham / Renaissance Philosophers 5. Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism: The Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries Descartes. [REVIEW] In Donald Palmer (ed.), Looking at Philosophy: The Unbearable Heaviness of Philosophy Made Lighter. Mcgraw-Hill
     
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  41. Graham Oppy & N. N. Trakakis (2013). Medieval Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Volume 2. Routledge.
    The Medieval period was one of the richest eras for the philosophical study of religion. Covering the period from the 6th to the 16th century, reaching into the Renaissance, "The History of Western Philosophy of Religion 2" shows how Christian, Islamic and Jewish thinkers explicated and defended their religious faith in light of the philosophical traditions they inherited from the ancient Greeks and Romans. The enterprise of 'faith seeking understanding', as it was dubbed by the medievals themselves, emerges as (...)
     
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  42. Graham Oppy & N. N. Trakakis (2013). Medieval Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Volume 2. Routledge.
    This is the second of five volumes in our History of Western Philosophy of Religion. It covers the Medieval period,and includes chapters on: Boethius; John Scottus; Al-Farabi; Avicenna; Anselm; Bernard of Clairvaux; Averroes; Maimonides; Bacon; Aquinas; Duns Scotus; Ockham; Gersonides; Wyclif; Nicholas of Cusa; Erasmus.
     
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  43.  11
    Edwin A. Quain (1946). Bibliography of English Translations From Medieval Sources. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):698-700.
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  44.  14
    William J. Courtenay (2012). Latin Aristotle Commentaries, V: Bibliography of Secondary Literature_, And: _Latin Aristotle Commentaries, I.2: Medieval Authors M–Z (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):141-142.
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  45.  45
    Pasquale Porro (ed.) (2001). The Medieval Concept of Time: Studies on the Scholastic Debate and its Reception in Early Modern Philosophy. Brill.
    This volume provides a comprehensive historico-doctrinal analysis of the transformation of the concept of time in the transition from the medieval debate to ...
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  46. Anneliese Maier (1982). On the Threshold of Exact Science: Selected Writings of Anneliese Maier on Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. University of Pennsylvania Press.
    The nature of motion -- Causes, forces, and resistance -- The concept of the function in fourteenth-century physics -- The significance of the theory of impetus for Scholastic natural philosophy -- Galileo and the Scholastic theory of impetus -- The theory of the elements and the problem of their participation in compounds -- The achievements of late Scholastic natural philosophy.
     
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  47.  26
    A. H. Armstrong (ed.) (1967). The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy. London, Cambridge U.P..
    Surveys philosophy from the neo-Platonists to St. Anselm, showing how Greek philosophy took the form in which it was known to its cultural inheritors and how ...
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  48. Frederick Charles Copleston (1961). Medieval Philosophy. New York, Harper.
  49.  38
    Jan Aertsen (2012). Medieval Philosophy as Transcendental Thought: From Philip the Chancellor (Ca. 1225) to Francisco Suarez. Brill.
    This book provides for the first time a complete history of the doctrine of the transcendentals and shows its importance for the understanding of philosophy in the Middle Ages.
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  50.  4
    Wing-tsit Chan (1969). An Outline and an Annotated Bibliography of Chinese Philosophy. New Haven, Far Eastern Publications, Yale University.
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