Search results for 'Philosophy, Medieval Islamic influences' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  27
    Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, (...)
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  2.  13
    Oliver Leaman (1985). An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is an introduction to debates in philosophy within the medieval Islamic world. It discusses a number of themes which were controversial within the philosophical community of that period: the creation of the world out of nothing, immortality, resurrection, the nature of ethics, and the relationship between natural and religious law. The author provides an account of the arguments of Farabi, Avicenna, Ghazali, Averroes and Maimonides on these and related topics. His argument takes into account the significance (...)
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  3. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (2004). Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  4. Arthur Hyman (ed.) (1977). Essays in Medieval Jewish and Islamic Philosophy: Studies From the Publications of the American Academy for Jewish Research. Ktav Pub. House.
  5.  7
    Charles E. Butterworth & Blake Andrée Kessel (eds.) (1994). The Introduction of Arabic Philosophy Into Europe. E.J. Brill.
    These essays on the way medieval Arabic philosophy was first introduced into European universities explain their formal working and provide fascinating accounts ...
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  6.  16
    Charles E. Butterworth (1983). Ethics in Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Journal of Religious Ethics 11 (2):224 - 239.
    This essay focuses on three of Islam's best-known philosophers: Farabi, Avicenna, and Averroes. It sets forth and compares their ethical teaching on the following basic issues: (1) the relation of philosophy to religion, (2) the communal basis of ethics and the comcomitant role of statecraft, and (3) some specific charac- teristics of their ethical teaching. Throughout the essay the close connection of medieval Islamic with classical Greek philosophy is noted.
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  7.  48
    Iysa A. Bello (1989). The Medieval Islamic Controversy Between Philosophy and Orthodoxy: Ijm̄aʻ and Taʼwīl in the Conflict Between Al-Ghazālī and Ibn Rushd. E.J. Brill.
    ... Abu Hamid al-Ghazall enumerates twenty questions upon which he contends the philosophers have formulated heretical theories against which the Muslim ...
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  8.  33
    Gerhard Endress, Rüdiger Arnzen & J. Thielmann (eds.) (2004). Words, Texts, and Concepts Cruising the Mediterranean Sea: Studies on the Sources, Contents and Influences of Islamic Civilization and Arabic Philosophy and Science: Dedicated to Gerhard Endress on His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Peeters.
    This statement by the late Franz Rosenthal is, in a sense, the uniting theme of the present volume's 35 articles by renowned scholars of Islamic Studies, Middle ...
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  9. Tamar Rudavsky (1988). Divine Omniscience and Omnipotence in Medieval Philosophy. Islamic, Jewish and Christian Perspectives. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 50 (1):148-149.
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  10.  8
    Carlos Fraenkel (2010). Theocracy and Autonomy in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Political Theory 38 (3):340 - 366.
    According to both contemporary intuitions and scholarly opinion, autonomy is something specifically modern. It is certainly taken to be incompatible with religions like Islam and Judaism, if these are invested with political power. Both religions are seen as centered on a divine Law (sharî'a, viz., torah) which prescribes what we may and may not do, promising reward for obedience and threatening punishment for disobedience. Not we, but God makes the rules. This picture is in important ways misleading. There is, I (...)
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  11.  12
    Esther Seidel (2011). Die Konzeption Des Messias Bei maimoniDes Und Die Fruehmittelalterliche Islamische Philosophie (MaimoniDes' Concept of the Messiah and Early Medieval Islamic Philosophy) (Review). Philosophy East and West 61 (4):723-726.
    Francesca Albertini's voluminous study, Die Konzeption des Messias bei Maimonides und die fruehmittelalterliche islamische Philosophie, wishes to put a fresh emphasis on the link between Maimonides' concept of the Messiah and his ideal of the leader as a political figure. For Maimonides, Albertini argues, the arrival of the Messiah will be realized only through human effort and appropriate behavior: it is man who bears responsibility for this event through his moral actions. The Messiah, on the other hand, as the leader (...)
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  12.  3
    Menachem Kellner (1990). Proofs for Eternity, Creation and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):98-99.
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  13.  2
    David Thomas (1987). An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy By Oliver Leaman Cambridge University Press, 1985, Xii+208 Pp., £20.00, £6.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Philosophy 62 (240):252-.
  14. David Thomas (1987). LEAMAN, OLIVER An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy 62:252.
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  15. R. G. Wengert (1986). Oliver Leaman, An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (7):343-345.
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  16. R. Wengert (1986). Oliver Leaman, An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 6:343-345.
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  17.  40
    John Inglis (ed.) (2003). Medieval Philosophy and the Classical Tradition in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Routledgecurzon.
    The Islamic philosophical tradition was the privileged site for the study and continuation of the Classical philosophical tradition in the Middle Ages. An initial chapter on the history of Islamic philosophy sets the stage for sixteen articles on issues across the Islamic, Jewish and Christian traditions. The goal is to see the Islamic tradition in its own richness and complexity as the context of much Jewish intellectual work. Taken together, these two traditions provide the wider context (...)
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  18.  2
    Richard Taylor (1990). Proofs for Eternity, Creation and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (3):646-648.
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  19.  3
    Beatrice H. Zedler (1987). Oliver Leaman, An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Cambridge, Eng., and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1985. Pp. Xii, 208. $34.50 (Cloth); $12.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (3):697-698.
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  20.  1
    Beatrice Zedler (1987). An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (3):697-698.
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  21.  2
    Roxanne D. Marcotte (2006). Muhammad Ali Khalidi, Ed., Medieval Islamic Philosophical Writings. (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2005. Pp. Xlviii, 186; 1 Diagram. $65 (Cloth); $25.99 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (4):1215-1217.
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  22. Francesca Yardenit Albertini, Die Konzeption des Messias Bei Maimonides Und Die Frühmittelalterliche Islamische Philosophiemaimonides' Concept of the Messiah and Early Medieval Islamic Philosophy.
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  23. Charles Butterworth (1988). An Account of Recent Scholarship in Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Interpretation 16 (1):87-97.
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  24. C. Fraenkel (2010). Theocracy and Autonomy in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Political Theory 38 (3):340-366.
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  25.  2
    J. Shaw, Vijay Bharadwaha, S. Bhatt, W. Hudson & Ian Netton (1992). Review of Form and Validity in Indian Logic, by Vijay Bharadwaja ; The Word and The World: India's Contribution to the Study of Language, by Bimal Krishna Matilal ;The Basic Ways of Knowing, by Govardhan P. Bhatt ; The Quest for Man, Ed. J. Van Nispen and D. Tiemersma ; Muslim-Christian Encounters: Perceptions and Misperceptions, by William Montgomery Watt ; Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, by Ilai Alon, in Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science, Texts and Studies, Vol. 10 ; Tsung-Mi and the Sinification of Buddhism, by Peter N. Gregory ; Modern Civilization: A Crisis of Fragmentation, by S. C. Malik ; and Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, Ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (2):187-210.
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  26. Ian Netton, Oliver Leaman & Whalen Lai (1992). Review of Ibn Rushd , by Dominique Urvoy ; Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, by Deborah L. Black ; Philosophy and Science in the Islamic World, by C. A. Qadir ; Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots, by Robert E. Allinson ; On Justice: An Essay in Jewish Philosophy, by . L. E. Goodman. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (1):101-113.
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  27.  26
    Muhammad Ali Khalidi (ed.) (2005). Medieval Islamic Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy in the Islamic world emerged in the ninth century and continued to flourish into the fourteenth century. It was strongly influenced by Greek thought, but Islamic philosophers also developed an original philosophical culture of their own, which had a considerable impact on the subsequent course of Western philosophy. This volume offers new translations of philosophical writings by Farabi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, and Ibn Rushd (Averroes). All of the texts presented here were very influential and (...)
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  28.  29
    Richard C. Dales (1995). The Problem of the Rational Soul in the Thirteenth Century. E.J. Brill.
    This study of the interaction of the Aristotelian and Augustinian views of the soul traces the disarray of Latin concepts by 1240, the solutions of Bonaventure ...
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  29.  11
    R. W. Mulligan (1987). Divine Omniscience and Omnipotence in Medieval Philosophy: Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Perspectives. Edited by Tamar Rudavsky. Modern Schoolman 64 (3):207-209.
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  30.  8
    R. W. Mulligan (1987). Divine Omniscience and Omnipotence in Medieval Philosophy: Islamic, Jewish, and Christian Perspectives. Edited by Tamar Rudavsky. Modern Schoolman 64 (3):207-209.
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  31.  2
    Richard Lemay (1996). Abu Maʻšar, The Abbreviation of the Introduction to Astrology, Together with the Medieval Latin Translation of Adelard of Bath, Ed. And Trans. Charles Burnett, Keiji Yamamoto, and Michio Yano.(Islamic Philosophy, Theology, and Science, 15.) Leiden, New York, and Cologne: EJ Brill, 1994. Pp. Viii, 170; Tables. $57.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (2):384-385.
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  32.  1
    Morton W. Bloomfield (1979). Arthur Hyman, Ed., Essays in Medieval Jewish and Islamic Philosophy: Studies From the Publications of the American Academy for Jewish Research. New York: Ktav, 1977. Pp. Liv, 427. $25. [REVIEW] Speculum 54 (4):883.
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  33. Lenn E. Goodman (1988). Ordinary and Extraordinary Language in Medieval Jewish and Islamic Philosophy. Manuscrito: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 11 (1):57-83.
     
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  34.  57
    Farshad Sadri (2010). How Early Muslim Scholars Assimilated Aristotle and Made Iran the Intellectual Center of the Islamic World: A Study of Falsafah. Edwin Mellen Press.
    This work demonstrates how falsafah (which linguistically refers to a group of commentaries by Muslim scholars associated with their readings of "The Corpus Aristotelicum") in Iran has been always closely linked with religion. It demonstrates that the blending of the new natural theology with Iranian culture created an intellectual climate that made Iran the center of falsafah in the Medieval world. The author begins this book by exploring the analytical arguments and methodologies presented as the subject of the first-philosophy (...)
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  35. Oliver Leaman (2002). An Introduction to Classical Islamic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Islamic philosophy is a unique and fascinating form of thought, and particular interest lies in its classical (Greek-influenced) period, when many of the ideas of Greek philosophy were used to explore the issues and theoretical problems which arise in trying to understand the Qur'an and Islamic practice. In this revised and expanded edition of his classic introductory work, Oliver Leaman examines the distinctive features of Classical Islamic philosophy and offers detailed accounts of major individual thinkers. In contrast (...)
     
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  36.  17
    Lenn Evan Goodman (1999). Jewish and Islamic Philosophy: Crosspollinations in the Classic Age. Rutgers University Press.
    Examines core issues common to Jewish and Islamic philosophy, such as freedom and determinism, the basis of ethical values, and the relationship between faith ...
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  37.  11
    Dimitri Gutas, Felicitas Meta Maria Opwis & David Reisman (eds.) (2012). Islamic Philosophy, Science, Culture, and Religion: Studies in Honor of Dimitri Gutas. Brill.
    This collection of essays covers the classical heritage and Islamic culture, classical Arabic science and philosophy, and Muslim religious sciences, showing continuation of Greek and Persian thought as well as original Muslim contributions ...
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  38.  36
    Sarah Stroumsa (ed.) (1999). Freethinkers of Medieval Islam: Ibn Al-Rawāndī, Abū Bakr Al-Rāzī and Their Impact on Islamic Thought. Brill.
    This book endeavors to identify and define the phenomenon of freethinking in medieval Islam, in particular as exemplified in the figures of the two most ...
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  39. Jeremiah Hackett & Arthur Hyman (1988). A Straight Path Studies in Medieval Philosophy and Culture : Essays in Honor of Arthur Hyman.
     
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  40. Husain Kassim (2000). Aristotle and Aristotelianism in Medieval Muslim, Jewish, and Christian Philosophy Husain Kassim.
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  41. Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny, Jan Pinborg & Eleonore Stump (1984). The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Disintegration of Scholasticism, 1100-1600. Journal of Philosophy 81 (3):150-156.
    This 1982 book is a history of the great age of scholastism from Abelard to the rejection of Aristotelianism in the Renaissance, combining the highest standards of medieval scholarship with a respect for the interests and insights of contemporary philosophers, particularly those working in the analytic tradition. The volume follows on chronologically from The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, though it does not continue the histories of Greek and Islamic philosophy but concentrates on (...)
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  42. Remke Kruk & Gerhard Endress (eds.) (1997). The Ancient Tradition in Christian and Islamic Hellenism: Studies on the Transmission of Greek Philosophy and Sciences: Dedicated to H. J. Drossaart Lulofs on His Ninetieth Birthday. Research School Cnws.
  43. Daniel H. Frank & Oliver Leaman (eds.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    From the ninth to the fifteenth centuries Jewish thinkers living in Islamic and Christian lands philosophized about Judaism. Influenced first by Islamic theological speculation and the great philosophers of classical antiquity, and then in the late medieval period by Christian Scholasticism, Jewish philosophers and scientists reflected on the nature of language about God, the scope and limits of human understanding, the eternity or createdness of the world, prophecy and divine providence, the possibility of human freedom, and the (...)
     
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  44.  16
    Anthony Kenny (2005/2007). Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Sir Anthony Kenny here continues his fascinating account of the history of philosophy, focusing on the thousand-year-long medieval period. This is the second volume of a four-book set in which Kenny will unfold a magisterial new history of Western philosophy, the first major single-author history of philosophy to appear in decades. In this volume, Kenny takes us on a fascinating tour through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy from the founders (...)
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  45. Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the rise (...)
     
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  46.  53
    William C. Chittick (2001). The Heart of Islamic Philosophy: The Quest for Self-Knowledge in the Teachings of Afḍal Al-Dīn Kāshānī. Oxford University Press.
    This book introduces the work of an important medieval Islamic philosopher who is little known outside the Persian world. Afdal al-Din Kashani was a contemporary of a number of important Muslim thinkers, including Averroes and Ibn al-Arabi. Kashani did not write for advanced students of philosophy but rather for beginners. In the main body of his work, he offers especially clear and insightful expositions of various philosophical positions, making him an invaluable resource for those who would like to (...)
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  47.  21
    Salman H. Bashier (2011). The Story of Islamic Philosophy: Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Al-'Arabi, and Others on the Limit Between Naturalism and Traditionalism. State University of New York Press.
    Offers a new interpretation of medieval Islamic philosophy, one informed by Platonic mysticism.
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  48. Graham Oppy & N. N. Trakakis (2014). Medieval Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Volume 2. Routledge.
    The Medieval period was one of the richest eras for the philosophical study of religion. Covering the period from the 6th to the 16th century, reaching into the Renaissance, "The History of Western Philosophy of Religion 2" shows how Christian, Islamic and Jewish thinkers explicated and defended their religious faith in light of the philosophical traditions they inherited from the ancient Greeks and Romans. The enterprise of 'faith seeking understanding', as it was dubbed by the medievals themselves, emerges (...)
     
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  49.  11
    Kiki Kennedy-Day (2003). Books of Definition in Islamic Philosophy: The Limits of Words. Routledgecurzon.
    The first section of this book surveys the development of Islamic philosophy though an examination of the definitions for substance, cause and matter. These important philosophical terms were defined by each new generation of philosophers. The definitions show an awareness of Greek philosophy, but also take metaphysical thought into an Islamic matrix. In the second section the author translates Ibn Sina's Kitab al-hudud and puts the tenth-century philosopher in his proper geopolitical sphere. Questions of Ibn Sina' connection with (...)
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  50.  31
    Muhsin Mahdi (2001). Alfarabi and the Foundation of Islamic Political Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    In this work, Muhsin Mahdi--widely regarded as the preeminent scholar of Islamic political thought--distills more than four decades of research to offer an authoritative analysis of the work of Alfarabi, the founder of Islamic political philosophy. Mahdi, who also brought to light writings of Alfarabi that had long been presumed lost or were not even known, presents this great thinker as his contemporaries would have seen him: as a philosopher who sought to lay the foundations for a new (...)
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