Search results for 'Philosophy, Medieval, in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & International Society for Phenomenology and Literature (1982). The Philosophical Reflection of Man in Literature Selected Papers From Several Conferences Held by the International Society for Phenomenology and Literature in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
     
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  2. Howard Rollin Patch (1922). The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Medieval Philosophy and Literature. R. West.
     
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  3. Virginie Greene (2014). Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, new ways of storytelling and inventing fictions appeared in the French-speaking areas of Europe. This new art still influences our global culture of fiction. Virginie Greene explores the relationship between fiction and the development of neo-Aristotelian logic during this period through a close examination of seminal literary and philosophical texts by major medieval authors, such as Anselm of Canterbury, Abélard, and Chrétien de Troyes. This study of Old French logical fictions encourages a broader theoretical (...)
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  4.  2
    J. Shaw, Vijay Bharadwaha, S. Bhatt, W. Hudson & Ian Netton (1992). Review of Form and Validity in Indian Logic, by Vijay Bharadwaja ; The Word and The World: India's Contribution to the Study of Language, by Bimal Krishna Matilal ;The Basic Ways of Knowing, by Govardhan P. Bhatt ; The Quest for Man, Ed. J. Van Nispen and D. Tiemersma ; Muslim-Christian Encounters: Perceptions and Misperceptions, by William Montgomery Watt ; Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, by Ilai Alon, in Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science, Texts and Studies, Vol. 10 ; Tsung-Mi and the Sinification of Buddhism, by Peter N. Gregory ; Modern Civilization: A Crisis of Fragmentation, by S. C. Malik ; and Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, Ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (2):187-210.
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  5. E. J. Leiden, Michael Fuss, Har Gibb, Jh Kramers, Salim Kemal, Richard Kieckehefer, George D. Bond, Bk Matilal, Oxford Oxford & W. Montgomery Watt (1992). AL-AZMEH, A.(1990) Ibn Khaldun, London, Routledge. ALON, ILAI (1991) Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, Leiden, EJ Brill. BENN, CHARLES D.(1991) The Cavern Mystery Transmission, Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press. BHARADWAJA, VK (1990) Form and Validity in Indian Logic, Shimla, Indian Institute of Advanced Study. BLACK, DEBORAH L.(1990) Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Mediaeval Arabic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (1):117.
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  6.  21
    David Chai (2012). Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo, Eds., Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China; Interpretation and Literature in Early Medieval China. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):314-316.
  7.  18
    Tobias Hoffmann (ed.) (2012). A Companion to Angels in Medieval Philosophy. Brill.
    This book studies medieval theories of angelology insofar as they made groundbreaking contributions to medieval philosophy. -/- The discussion of angels, made famous by the humanist caricature of ‘how many angels can dance on the head of a pin’, was nevertheless a crucial one in medieval philosophical debates. All scholastic masters pronounced themselves on angelology, if only in their Sentence commentaries. The questions concerning angelic cognition, speech, free decision, movement, etc. were springboards for profound philosophical discussions that have to do (...)
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  8.  21
    Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from Christian (...)
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  9.  10
    Julian N. Wasserman & Lois Roney (eds.) (1989). Sign, Sentence, Discourse: Language in Medieval Thought and Literature. Syracuse University Press.
    EDITORS' INTRODUCTION B he Vedas tell of a conversation between a young man, Shvetaketu, and his father concerning what the son had learned in his education ...
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  10. Bonnie Dorrick Kent (2007). Evil in Later Medieval Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):177-205.
    This essay presents a critical review of recent literature on evil in medieval philosophy, as understood by thinkers from Anselm of Canterbury onward. "Evil" is taken to include not only serious, deliberate wrongdoing, but also everyday sins done from ignorance or passion. Special attention is paid to Aquinas's De Malo, Giles of Rome and the aftermath of the 1277 Condemnation, scholarly disputes about Scotus's teachings, and commentaries on the Nicomachean Ethics by Walter Burley, Gerald Odonis, and John Buridan.
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  11.  30
    James D. Sellmann (2013). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China Ed. By Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (3):451-455.
    The Early Han enjoyed some prosperity while it struggled with centralization and political control of the kingdom. The Later Han was plagued by the court intrigue, corrupt eunuchs, and massive flooding of the Yellow River that eventually culminated in popular uprisings that led to the demise of the dynasty. The period that followed was a renewed warring states period that likewise stimulated a rebirth of philosophical and religious debate, growth, and innovations. Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo's Philosophy and (...)
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  12. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue in (...)
     
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  13.  31
    P. S. Eardley (2006). The Foundations of Freedom in Later Medieval Philosophy: Giles of Rome and His Contemporaries. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):353-376.
    : This article explores the philosophical and theological context in which later medieval debates surrounding the foundations of freedom emerged. In particular, the article establishes that Aquinas's famous pupil Giles of Rome (1243/47-1316) was less indebted to St. Thomas himself on the question of human freedom than has commonly been supposed. Rather, his teachings on the will and human freedom owe more to such Franciscan thinkers as John of la Rochelle and Walter of Bruges. This interpretation challenges the received view, (...)
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  14. Richard A. Dwyer (1976). Boethian Fictions: Narratives in the Medieval French Versions of the Consolatio Philosophiae. Mediaeval Academy of America.
     
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  15.  26
    Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  16.  43
    Isadore Twersky (ed.) (1979). Studies in Medieval Jewish History and Literature. Harvard University Press.
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  17. Anja Eisenbeiss & Lieselotte E. Saurma-Jeltsch (eds.) (2012). Images of Otherness in Medieval and Early Modern Times: Exclusion, Inclusion and Assimilation. Deutscher Kunstverlag.
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  18. C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.) (2010). Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  19. Lawrence D. Roberts (ed.) (1982). Approaches to Nature in the Middle Ages: Papers of the Tenth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies. Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies.
     
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  20.  55
    Brett Bourbon (2004). Finding a Replacement for the Soul: Mind and Meaning in Literature and Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    Approaching the study of literature as a unique form of the philosophy of language and mind--as a study of how we produce nonsense and imagine it as sense--this ...
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  21.  1
    Chiara Neri (2015). The Case of the Sārasaṅgaha: Reflections on the Reuse of Texts in Medieval Sinhalese Pāli Literature. Journal of Indian Philosophy 43 (4-5):335-388.
    The Sārasaṅgaha is a Pāli text of XIIth–XIIIth century by the Sinhalese monk Siddhattha Thera. Its themes include the aspiration to become a Buddha, shrines, meditation, theories on rain, wind, gender and more. The main body consists of citations from the Nikāyas, the Jātakas, the Visuddhimagga and above all, from commentarial literature. By analysing the way the Sārasaṅgaha refers to and establishes a dialogue with the quoted works, this paper promotes a new assessment of the cultural and textual tendencies (...)
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  22.  28
    Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  23.  14
    Nancy Yousef (2004). Isolated Cases: The Anxieties of Autonomy in Enlightenment Philosophy and Romantic Literature. Cornell University Press.
    While individuals presented in central texts of the period are indeed often alone or separated from others, Yousef regards this isolation as a problem the texts attempt to illuminate, rather than a condition they construct as normative or ...
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  24.  17
    Julian L. Ross (1950). Philosophy in Literature. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):141-142.
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  25.  18
    Ullrich Langer (1994). Perfect Friendship: Studies in Literature and Moral Philosophy From Boccaccio to Corneille. Librairie Droz.
    I am grateful to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a year-long fellowship that enabled me to write major portions of this book; ...
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  26. Morris Weitz (1963). Philosophy in Literature: Shakespeare, Voltaire, Tolstoy & Proust. Detroit, Wayne State University Press.
     
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  27.  14
    Frederick E. Brenk (1998). Relighting the Souls: Studies in Plutarch, in Greek Literature, Religion, and Philosophy, and in the New Testament Background. Franz Steiner Verlag.
    This collection contains many stimulating and important articles from the Plutarch renaissance, especially on the interaction between divine and human worlds, ...
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  28. Charles W. Johnson (1992). Philosophy in Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  29. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature: Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light. Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  30. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light /Konstantin Kolenda. --. --. Barnes & Noble, Books,1982.
     
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  31. H. P. Rickman (1996). Philosophy in Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  32.  5
    Michael Calabrese (1994). The Tragic and the Sublime in Medieval Literature (Review). Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):173-174.
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  33. Bruno Snell (1960). The Discovery of the Mind: In Greek Philosophy and Literature. Dover.
    German classicist's monumental study of the origins of European thought in Greek literature and philosophy. Brilliant, widely influential. Includes "Homer's View of Man," "The Olympian Gods," "The Rise of the Individual in the Early Greek Lyric," "Pindar's Hymn to Zeus," "Myth and Reality in Greek Tragedy," and "Aristophanes and Aesthetic Criticism.".
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  34.  27
    Jean Leclercq (1979). The Image of St. Bernard in the Late Medieval Exampla Literature. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):291-302.
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  35.  14
    Daniel H. Frank (1994). Socrates in Medieval Arabic Literature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):134-135.
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  36.  12
    Mark McPherran (1993). Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature. Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):472-475.
  37.  37
    Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, Herbert Davidson provides (...)
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  38. Guido Kums, Hugo Roeffaers, Elisabeth Bekers & D. J. Conlon (eds.) (2004). Sans Everything: Essays on English Literature, Philosophy, and Culture in Honour of Guido Kums and Hugo Roeffaers. Acco.
     
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  39.  20
    Mark Miller (2004). Philosophical Chaucer: Love, Sex, and Agency in the Canterbury Tales. Cambridge University Press.
    While most Chaucer critics interested in gender and sexuality have used psychoanalytic theory to analyze Chaucer's poetry, Mark Miller re-examines the links between sexuality and the philosophical analysis of agency in medieval texts such as the Canterbury Tales, Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, and the Romance of the Rose. Chaucer's philosophical sophistication provides the basis for a new interpretation of the emerging notions of sexual desire and romantic love in the late Middle Ages.
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  40. D. N. Shanbhag, K. B. Archak & Michael (eds.) (2007). Science, History, Philosophy, and Literature in Sanskrit Classics: Dr. D.N. Shanbhag Felicitation Volume. Sundeep Prakashan.
     
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  41. D. N. Shanbhag, K. B. Archak & Michael (eds.) (2007). Science, History, Philosophy, and Literature in Sanskrit Classics: Dr. Sundeep Prakashan.
     
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  42. Andrew Smith (2000). Gothic Radicalism: Literature, Philosophy, and Psychoanalysis in the Nineteenth Century. St. Martin's Press.
    Applying ideas drawn from contemporary critical theory, this book historicizes psychoanalysis through a new and significant theorization of the Gothic. The central premise is that the nineteenth-century Gothic produced a radical critique of accounts of sublimity and Freudian psychoanalysis. This book makes a major contribution to an understanding of both the nineteenth century and the Gothic discourse which challenged the dominant ideas of that period. Writers explored include Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker.
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  43.  36
    Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement and Origen (...)
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  44.  20
    Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, present the (...)
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  45.  3
    Henry Bett (1925). Johannes Scotus Erigena: A Study in Mediaeval Philosophy. Hyperion Press.
    Originally published in 1925, this book provides an overview of the philosophy of Johannes Scotus Erigena. Bett explains Erigena's thinking as well as the influence he had over later philosophers, despite the fact that his writings were banned by the Pope. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in medieval philosophy and Erigena's philosophy in particular.
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  46.  21
    Robert Eisen (2004). The Book of Job in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Medieval Jewish philosophers have been studied extensively by modern scholars, but even though their philosophical thinking was often shaped by their interpretation of the Bible, relatively little attention has been paid to them as biblical interpreters. In this study, Robert Eisen breaks new ground by analyzing how six medieval Jewish philosophers approached the Book of Job. These thinkers covered are Saadiah Gaon, Moses Maimonides, Samuel ibn Tibbon, Zerahiah Hen, Gersonides, and Simon ben Zemah Duran. Eisen explores each philosopher's reading of (...)
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  47.  43
    John Inglis (ed.) (2003). Medieval Philosophy and the Classical Tradition in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Routledgecurzon.
    The Islamic philosophical tradition was the privileged site for the study and continuation of the Classical philosophical tradition in the Middle Ages. An initial chapter on the history of Islamic philosophy sets the stage for sixteen articles on issues across the Islamic, Jewish and Christian traditions. The goal is to see the Islamic tradition in its own richness and complexity as the context of much Jewish intellectual work. Taken together, these two traditions provide the wider context to which Latin Christian (...)
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  48. Tracy Llanera (forthcoming). Of Private Selves and Public Morals: Philosophy and Literature in Modernity. In Philippa Kelly, Emily Finlay & Tom Clark (eds.), Worldmaking: Literature, Language, Culture. John Benjamins
    What is the moral, spiritual, and educative function of philosophy and literature in modern lives? Such a large question is rarely posed by philosophers or literary theorists these days, but one philosopher who has put it at the top of his agenda is Richard Rorty. His general answer is that both literature and philosophy serve distinct ends: the private end of personal fulfilment through the redescription of experiences and the possibility of self-creation, and the public end of expanded (...)
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  49. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
     
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  50. Albrecht Classen (ed.) (2010). Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences. Walter de Gruyter.
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's laughter and gender politics (...)
     
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