Search results for 'Philosophy, Medieval, in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Howard Rollin Patch (1922/1978). The Tradition of the Goddess Fortuna in Medieval Philosophy and Literature. R. West.score: 1356.0
     
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  2. David Chai (2012). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo . (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. V, 375 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3187-1. Paperback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3188-8.) Interpretation and Literature in Early Medieval China. Edited by Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo . (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2010. Vi, 288 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3217-5. Paperback, ISBN 978-1-4384-3218-2.). [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):314-316.score: 972.0
  3. Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.score: 840.0
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from Christian (...)
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  4. Julian N. Wasserman & Lois Roney (eds.) (1989). Sign, Sentence, Discourse: Language in Medieval Thought and Literature. Syracuse University Press.score: 780.0
    EDITORS' INTRODUCTION B he Vedas tell of a conversation between a young man, Shvetaketu, and his father concerning what the son had learned in his education ...
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  5. James D. Sellmann (2013). Philosophy and Religion in Early Medieval China Ed. By Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (3):451-455.score: 744.0
    The Early Han enjoyed some prosperity while it struggled with centralization and political control of the kingdom. The Later Han was plagued by the court intrigue, corrupt eunuchs, and massive flooding of the Yellow River that eventually culminated in popular uprisings that led to the demise of the dynasty. The period that followed was a renewed warring states period that likewise stimulated a rebirth of philosophical and religious debate, growth, and innovations. Alan K. L. Chan and Yuet-Keung Lo's Philosophy and (...)
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  6. E. J. Leiden, Michael Fuss, Har Gibb, Jh Kramers, Salim Kemal, Richard Kieckehefer, George D. Bond, Bk Matilal, Oxford Oxford & W. Montgomery Watt (1992). AL-AZMEH, A.(1990) Ibn Khaldun, London, Routledge. ALON, ILAI (1991) Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, Leiden, EJ Brill. BENN, CHARLES D.(1991) The Cavern Mystery Transmission, Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press. BHARADWAJA, VK (1990) Form and Validity in Indian Logic, Shimla, Indian Institute of Advanced Study. BLACK, DEBORAH L.(1990) Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Mediaeval Arabic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (1):117.score: 668.0
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  7. P. S. Eardley (2006). The Foundations of Freedom in Later Medieval Philosophy: Giles of Rome and His Contemporaries. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):353-376.score: 660.0
    : This article explores the philosophical and theological context in which later medieval debates surrounding the foundations of freedom emerged. In particular, the article establishes that Aquinas's famous pupil Giles of Rome (1243/47-1316) was less indebted to St. Thomas himself on the question of human freedom than has commonly been supposed. Rather, his teachings on the will and human freedom owe more to such Franciscan thinkers as John of la Rochelle and Walter of Bruges. This interpretation challenges the received view, (...)
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  8. Dana LaCourse Munteanu (2012). Tragic Pathos: Pity and Fear in Greek Philosophy and Tragedy. Cambridge University Press.score: 648.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Views about Pity and Fear as Aesthetic Emotions: 1. Drama and the emotions: an Indo-European connection? 2. Gorgias: a strange trio, the poetic emotions; 3. Plato: from reality to tragedy and back; 4. Aristotle: the first 'theorist' of the aesthetic emotions; Part II. Pity and Fear within Tragedies: 5. An introduction; 6. Aeschylus: Persians; 7. Prometheus Bound; 8. Sophocles: Ajax; 9. Euripides: Orestes; Appendix: catharsis and the emotions in the definition of tragedy (...)
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  9. Isadore Twersky (ed.) (1979). Studies in Medieval Jewish History and Literature. Harvard University Press.score: 648.0
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  10. Richard A. Dwyer (1976). Boethian Fictions: Narratives in the Medieval French Versions of the Consolatio Philosophiae. Mediaeval Academy of America.score: 648.0
     
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  11. Anja Eisenbeiss & Lieselotte E. Saurma-Jeltsch (eds.) (2012). Images of Otherness in Medieval and Early Modern Times: Exclusion, Inclusion and Assimilation. Deutscher Kunstverlag.score: 636.0
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  12. C. Stephen Jaeger (ed.) (2010). Magnificence and the Sublime in Medieval Aesthetics: Art, Architecture, Literature, Music. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 636.0
     
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  13. Lawrence D. Roberts (ed.) (1982). Approaches to Nature in the Middle Ages: Papers of the Tenth Annual Conference of the Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies. Center for Medieval & Early Renaissance Studies.score: 636.0
     
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  14. Chiara Neri (forthcoming). The Case of the Sārasaṅgaha: Reflections on the Reuse of Texts in Medieval Sinhalese Pāli Literature. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-54.score: 624.0
    The Sārasaṅgaha is a Pāli text of XIIth–XIIIth century by the Sinhalese monk Siddhattha Thera. Its themes include the aspiration to become a Buddha, shrines, meditation, theories on rain, wind, gender and more. The main body consists of citations from the Nikāyas, the Jātakas, the Visuddhimagga and above all, from commentarial literature. By analysing the way the Sārasaṅgaha refers to and establishes a dialogue with the quoted works, this paper promotes a new assessment of the cultural and textual tendencies (...)
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  15. Michael Calabrese (1994). The Tragic and the Sublime in Medieval Literature (Review). Philosophy and Literature 18 (1):173-174.score: 588.0
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  16. Daniel H. Frank (1994). Socrates in Medieval Arabic Literature (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):134-135.score: 582.0
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  17. Mark Miller (2004). Philosophical Chaucer: Love, Sex, and Agency in the Canterbury Tales. Cambridge University Press.score: 576.0
    While most Chaucer critics interested in gender and sexuality have used psychoanalytic theory to analyze Chaucer's poetry, Mark Miller re-examines the links between sexuality and the philosophical analysis of agency in medieval texts such as the Canterbury Tales, Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, and the Romance of the Rose. Chaucer's philosophical sophistication provides the basis for a new interpretation of the emerging notions of sexual desire and romantic love in the late Middle Ages.
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  18. John Inglis (ed.) (2003). Medieval Philosophy and the Classical Tradition in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Routledgecurzon.score: 567.0
    The Islamic philosophical tradition was the privileged site for the study and continuation of the Classical philosophical tradition in the Middle Ages. An initial chapter on the history of Islamic philosophy sets the stage for sixteen articles on issues across the Islamic, Jewish and Christian traditions. The goal is to see the Islamic tradition in its own richness and complexity as the context of much Jewish intellectual work. Taken together, these two traditions provide the wider context to which Latin Christian (...)
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  19. Simo Knuuttila (2004). Emotions in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 567.0
    Emotions are the focus of intense debate both in contemporary philosophy and psychology, and increasingly also in the history of ideas. Simo Knuuttila presents a comprehensive survey of philosophical theories of emotion from Plato to Renaissance times, combining rigorous philosophical analysis with careful historical reconstruction. The first part of the book covers the conceptions of Plato and Aristotle and later ancient views from Stoicism to Neoplatonism and, in addition, their reception and transformation by early Christian thinkers from Clement and Origen (...)
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  20. Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 567.0
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, present the (...)
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  21. Robert Eisen (2004). The Book of Job in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 567.0
    Medieval Jewish philosophers have been studied extensively by modern scholars, but even though their philosophical thinking was often shaped by their interpretation of the Bible, relatively little attention has been paid to them as biblical interpreters. In this study, Robert Eisen breaks new ground by analyzing how six medieval Jewish philosophers approached the Book of Job. These thinkers covered are Saadiah Gaon, Moses Maimonides, Samuel ibn Tibbon, Zerahiah Hen, Gersonides, and Simon ben Zemah Duran. Eisen explores each philosopher's reading of (...)
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  22. Herbert A. Davidson (1987). Proofs for Eternity, Creation, and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 567.0
    The central debate of natural theology among medieval Muslims and Jews concerned whether or not the world was eternal. Opinions divided sharply on this issue because the outcome bore directly on God's relationship with the world: eternity implies a deity bereft of will, while a world with a beginning leads to the contrasting picture of a deity possessed of will. In this exhaustive study of medieval Islamic and Jewish arguments for eternity, creation, and the existence of God, Herbert Davidson provides (...)
     
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  23. Andrew B. Schoedinger (ed.) (1996). Readings in Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 567.0
    The most comprehensive collection of its kind, this unique anthology presents fifty-four readings--many of them not widely available--by the most important and influential Christian, Jewish, and Muslim philosophers of the Middle Ages. The text is organized topically, making it easily accessible to students, and the large selection of readings provides instructors with maximum flexiblity in choosing course material. Each thematic section is comprised of six chronologically arranged readings. This organization focuses on the major philosophical issues and allows a smooth introduction (...)
     
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  24. Albrecht Classen (ed.) (2010). Laughter in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times: Epistemology of a Fundamental Human Behavior, its Meaning, and Consequences. Walter de Gruyter.score: 564.0
    Introduction: Laughter as an expression of human nature in the Middle Ages and the early modern period: literary, historical, theological, philosophical, and psychological reflections -- Judith Hagen. Laughter in Procopius's wars -- Livnat Holtzman. "Does God really laugh?": appropriate and inappropriate descriptions of God in Islamic traditionalist theology -- Daniel F. Pigg. Laughter in Beowulf: ambiguity, ambivalence, and group identity formation -- Mark Burde. The parodia sacra problem and medieval comic studies -- Olga V. Trokhimenko. Women's laughter and gender politics (...)
     
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  25. Bruce W. Holsinger (2001). Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer. Stanford University Press.score: 536.0
    Ranging chronologically from the twelfth to the fifteenth century and thematically from Latin to vernacular literary modes, this book challenges standard assumptions about the musical cultures and philosophies of the European Middle Ages. Engaging a wide range of premodern texts and contexts, from the musicality of sodomy in twelfth-century polyphony to Chaucer's representation of pedagogical violence in the Prioress's Tale, from early Christian writings on the music of the body to the plainchant and poetry of Hildegard of Bingen, the author (...)
     
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  26. Pasquale Porro (ed.) (2001). The Medieval Concept of Time: Studies on the Scholastic Debate and its Reception in Early Modern Philosophy. Brill.score: 522.0
    This volume provides a comprehensive historico-doctrinal analysis of the transformation of the concept of time in the transition from the medieval debate to ...
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  27. Dermot Moran (1999). Idealism in Medieval Philosophy: The Case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1):53-82.score: 522.0
    In this article I wish to re-examine the vexed issue of the possibility of idealism in ancient and medieval philosophy with particular reference to the case of Johannes Scottus Eriugena (c. 800idealisms immaterialism as his standard for idealism, and it is this decision, coupled with his failure to acknowledge the legacy of German idealism, which prevents him from seeing the classical and medieval roots of idealism more broadly understood.
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  28. Tobias Hofffmann (ed.) (2012). A Companion to Angels in Medieval Philosophy. Brill.score: 522.0
    This book studies medieval theories of angelology insofar as they made groundbreaking contributions to medieval philosophy.
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  29. Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.) (2012). Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 522.0
    This volume explores emotion in medieval and early modern thought, and opens a contemporary debate on the way emotions figure in our cognitive lives.
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  30. Israel Efros (1974). Studies in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. New York,Columbia University Press.score: 522.0
    The philosophy of Saadia Gaon.--Three essays.--Studies in pre-Tibbonian philosophical terminology.
     
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  31. Ernest A. Moody (1975). Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Science, and Logic: Collected Papers, 1933-1969. University of California Press.score: 495.0
    William of Auvergne and His Treatise De Anima I. Introduction William of Auvergne, Bishop of Paris from until his death in, is of interest to us chiefly ...
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  32. Gregg Stern (2009). Philosophy and Rabbinic Culture: Jewish Interpretation and Controversy in Medieval Languedoc. Routledge.score: 495.0
    Jewish learning and thought in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: implications of original philosophic work and the diffusion of philosophic learning in Languedoc -- 1250-1300: Jewish contacts with Christian intellectuals and Jewish thought regarding Christianity -- Meiri's transformation of Talmud study: philosophic spirituality in a halakhic key -- 1300: on the eve of the controversy -- 1300-1304: knowledge and authority in dispute -- 1304-1306: the controversy peaks -- The effects of the expulsion: Jewish philosophic culture in Roussillon and Provence.
     
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  33. Gyula Klima (2015). Intentionality, Cognition and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 486.0
    It is supposed to be common knowledge about the history of ideas that one of the few medieval philosophical contributions preserved in modern philosophical thought is the idea that mental phenomena are distinguished from physical phenomena by their intentionality, their directedness toward some object. As is usually the case with such commonplaces about the history of ideas, this claim is not quite true. Medieval philosophers routinely described ordinary physical phenomena, such as reflections in mirrors or sounds in the air, as (...)
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  34. Claude Panaccio (2007). Mental Language and Tradition Encounters in Medieval Philosophy: Anselm, Albert and Ockham. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):269-282.score: 486.0
    Medieval philosophy is often presented as the outcome of a large scale encounter between the Christian tradition and the Greek philosophical one. This picture, however, inappropriately tends to leave out the active role played by the medieval authors themselves and their institutional contexts. The theme of the mental language provides us with an interesting case study in such matters. The paper first introduces a few technical notions—'theme', 'tradition', 'textual chain' and 'textual borrowing'—, and then focuses on precise passages about mental (...)
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  35. John Emery Murdoch & Edith Dudley Sylla (eds.) (1975). The Cultural Context of Medieval Learning: Proceedings of the First International Colloquium on Philosophy, Science, and Theology in the Middle Ages--September 1973. D. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 486.0
    JOHN E. MURDOCH AND EDITH DUDLEY SYLLA INTRODUCTION Conferences and colloquia are held and their results often published, but very rarely is any account ...
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  36. Christophe Grellard & Aurélien Robert (eds.) (2009). Atomism in Late Medieval Philosophy and Theology. Brill.score: 486.0
    DMet 10: Prime matter is the origin of all quantities. Hence it is the origin of every dimension of continuous quantity whatever. ...
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  37. Daniel J. Lasker (2008). From Judah Hadassi to Elijah Bashyatchi: Studies in Late Medieval Karaite Philosophy. Brill.score: 486.0
    Background -- Major thinkers -- Contacts with Rabbanite thinkers -- Topics -- Into the modern period.
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  38. Richard N. Bosley & Martin M. Tweedale (eds.) (2006). Basic Issues in Medieval Philosophy, Second Edition: Selected Readings Presenting Interactive Discourse Among the Major Figures. Broadview Press.score: 486.0
    In this important collection, the editors argue that medieval philosophy is best studied as an interactive discussion between thinkers working on very much the same problems despite being often widely separated in time or place. Each section opens with at least one selection from a classical philosopher, and there are many points at which the readings chosen refer to other works that the reader will also find in this collection. There is a considerable amount of material from central figures such (...)
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  39. Ruth Glasner (2009). Averroes' Physics: A Turning Point in Medieval Natural Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 486.0
    Ruth Glasner presents an illuminating reappraisal of Averroes' physics.
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  40. Simo Knuutila (1993). Modalities in Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.score: 486.0
  41. Daniel Lee (2008). The Legacy of Medieval Constitutionalism in the Philosophy of Right: Hegel and the Prussian Reform Movement. History of Political Thought 29 (4):601-634.score: 486.0
    This article investigates the influence of constitutional debates emerging from the Prussian reform movement, 1810-9, on Hegel's theory of the modern constitutional state, as articulated in the Philosophy of Right. I argue that Hegel's theory, which combined constitutional monarchy with a sheme of corporate representation in assembled estates, was not simply a product of an abstract rationalist philosophy but rather, a deeply ideological vision of the medieval origins of modern Germany. In reconstructing the intellectual context of the Prussian Verfassungsfrage, I (...)
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  42. William J. Courtenay (1984). Covenant and Causality in Medieval Thought: Studies in Philosophy, Theology, and Economic Practice. Variorum Reprints.score: 486.0
  43. John Marenbon (2000). Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West. Ashgate/Variorum.score: 486.0
  44. Robert Pasnau (ed.) (2013). Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Volume 1. Oup Oxford.score: 486.0
    Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy showcases the best new scholarly work on philosophy from the end of antiquity into the Renaissance. OSMP combines historical scholarship with philosophical acuteness, and will be an essential resource for anyone working in the area.
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  45. Jan A. Aertsen (1992). Ontology and Henology in Medieval Philosophy. In Egbert P. Bos & P. A. Meijer (eds.), On Proclus and His Influence in Medieval Philosophy. E.J. Brill. 120--140.score: 486.0
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  46. Deborah L. Black (1990). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. E.J. Brill.score: 486.0
  47. E. P. Bos & P. A. Meijer (eds.) (1992). On Proclus and His Influence in Medieval Philosophy. E.J. Brill.score: 486.0
     
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  48. Stefano Caroti (ed.) (1989). Studies in Medieval Natural Philosophy. L.S. Olschki.score: 486.0
  49. Sten Ebbesen & Russell L. Friedman (eds.) (1999). Medieval Analyses in Language and Cognition: Acts of the Symposium, the Copenhagen School of Medieval Philosophy, January 10-13, 1996 Organized by the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters and the Institute for Greek and Latin, University of Copenhagen. [REVIEW] Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters.score: 486.0
  50. Jeffrey Hause (ed.) (2014). Debates in Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses. Routledge.score: 486.0
    Debates in Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses aims to de-mystify medieval works by offering an illuminating, engaging introduction to the problems that medieval philosophers from Augustine through Ockham wrestled with. Each of the volume’s 11 units presents a debate that will enable students to return to the primary texts prepared to think critically and imaginatively about them. Debates include: Does Anselm have a hierarchical or a flat conception of free will? Is Abelard’s ethics conceptually impoverished? Does Avicenna teach (...)
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