Search results for 'Philosophy, Russian History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  33
    Alyssa DeBlasio (2011). Writing the History of Russian Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 63 (3):203-226.
    This article addresses the writing of the history of Russian philosophy from the first of such works—Archimandrite Gavriil’s Russian Philosophy [ Russkaja filosofija , 1840]—to philosophical histories/textbooks in the twenty-first century. In the majority of these histories, both past and present, we find a relentless insistence on the delineation of “characterizing traits” of Russian philosophy and appeals to “historiosophy,” where historiosophy is employed as being distinct from the historiographical method. In the 1990s and 2000s, the genre (...)
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  2. Louis J. Shein (ed.) (1977). Readings in Russian Philosophical Thought: Philosophy of History. Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
     
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  3.  38
    Gary M. Hamburg & Randall Allen Poole (eds.) (2010). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830-1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: List of contributors; Acknowledgments; Introduction: the humanist tradition in Russian philosophy G. M. Hamburg and Randall A. Poole; Part I. The Nineteenth Century: 1. Slavophiles, Westernizers, and the birth of Russian philosophical humanism Sergey Horujy; 2. Alexander Herzen Derek Offord; 3. Materialism and the radical intelligentsia: the 1860s Victoria S. Frede; 4. Russian ethical humanism: from populism to neo-idealism Thomas Nemeth; Part II. Russian Metaphysical Idealism in Defense of Human Dignity: 5. Boris (...)
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  4.  5
    S. R. Seliga, V. V. Zenkovsky & George L. Kline (1955). A History of Russian Philosophy. Philosophical Quarterly 5 (21):375.
    This set reprints volumes that were orginally published by Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd. in 1953. Landmark volumes at the time of their original publication, these titles do not merely expound the theoretical constructions of Russian philosophers, but also relate these constructions to the general conditions of Russian life. Volume One examines the historical conditions of the development of philosophy in Russia and explores the general features of Russian philosophy. It also surveys the principal works on the (...)
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  5.  8
    Evert van der Zweerde (2001). The Normalization of the History of Philosophy in Post-Soviet Russian Philosophical Culture. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:95-104.
    The notion of ‘philosophical culture’ can be defined as the totality of conditions of philosophical thought and theory. Among these conditions is an awareness of the historical background of the philosophical culture in question. This awareness, which plays an important cognitive and normative role, often takes the form of a relatively independent discipline: history of philosophy. Over the last decade, Russian historians of philosophy have been attempting to make the repressed past accessible to contemporary philosophy, often modifying their (...)
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  6.  24
    Evert Van Der Zweerde (2001). The Normalization of the History of Philosophy in Post-Soviet Russian Philosophical Culture. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 12:95-104.
    The notion of ‘philosophical culture’ can be defined as the totality of conditions of philosophical thought and theory. Among these conditions is an awareness of the historical background of the philosophical culture in question. This awareness, which plays an important cognitive and normative role, often takes the form of a relatively independent discipline: history of philosophy. Over the last decade, Russian historians of philosophy have been attempting to make the repressed past accessible to contemporary philosophy, often modifying their (...)
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  7. Valeriĭ Aleksandrovich Kuvakin (ed.) (1994). A History of Russian Philosophy: From the Tenth Through the Twentieth Centuries. Prometheus Books.
     
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  8. V. V. Zenʹkovskiĭ (1953). A History of Russian Philosophy. New York, Columbia University Press.
     
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  9.  8
    E. van der Zweerde (2009). The Place of Russian Philosophy in World Philosophical History -- A Perspective. Diogenes 56 (2-3):170-186.
    This paper sketches the ambitious outlines of an assessment of the place of Russian philosophy in philosophical history ‘at large’, i.e. on a global and world-historical scale. At the same time, it indicates, rather modestly, a number of elements and aspects of such a project. A retrospective reflection and reconstruction is not only a recurrent phenomenon in philosophical culture (which, the author assumes, has become global), it also is, by virtue of its being a philosophical reflection, one among (...)
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  10.  2
    V. V. Zenkovsky (2003). A History of Russian Philosophy. Routledge.
    This set reprints volumes that were orginally published by Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd. in 1953. Landmark volumes at the time of their original publication, these titles do not merely expound the theoretical constructions of Russian philosophers, but also relate these constructions to the general conditions of Russian life. Volume One examines the historical conditions of the development of philosophy in Russia and explores the general features of Russian philosophy. It also surveys the principal works on the (...)
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  11. G. M. Hamburg & Randall A. Poole (eds.) (2010). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830–1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    The great age of Russian philosophy spans the century between 1830 and 1930 - from the famous Slavophile-Westernizer controversy of the 1830s and 1840s, through the 'Silver Age' of Russian culture at the beginning of the twentieth century, to the formation of a Russian 'philosophical emigration' in the wake of the Russian Revolution. This volume is a major history and interpretation of Russian philosophy in this period. Eighteen chapters discuss Russian philosophy's main figures, (...)
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  12. G. M. Hamburg & Randall A. Poole (eds.) (2013). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830–1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press.
    The great age of Russian philosophy spans the century between 1830 and 1930 - from the famous Slavophile-Westernizer controversy of the 1830s and 1840s, through the 'Silver Age' of Russian culture at the beginning of the twentieth century, to the formation of a Russian 'philosophical emigration' in the wake of the Russian Revolution. This volume is a major history and interpretation of Russian philosophy in this period. Eighteen chapters discuss Russian philosophy's main figures, (...)
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  13.  13
    Z. A. Kamenskii (2000). Was There a Break in the Development of Russian Philosophy in the Soviet Period of Its History? Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (2):86-91.
    The scholars who claim that a "black hole" appeared in the history of our philosophy are obviously violating the truth. Evidently, what they are saying is that there was no philosophy of the kind that they would call philosophy. Such an approach does not fit any theoretico-method-ological paradigm. One must study the subject, bring it under critical analysis, not declare unequivocally that there was no such thing. For this reason, I would like by way of introduction to touch upon (...)
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  14.  31
    Teresa Obolevitch (2015). Galileo in the Russian Orthodox Context: History, Philosophy, Theology, and Science. Zygon 50 (4):788-808.
    The trial of Galileo remains a representative example of the alleged incompatibility between science and religion as well as a suggestive case study of the relationship between them from the Western historical and methodological perspective. However, the Eastern Christian view has not been explored to a significant extent. In this article, the author considers relevant aspects of the reception of the teaching of Copernicus and Galileo in Russian culture, especially in the works of scientists. Whereas in prerevolutionary Russia Galileo (...)
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  15.  4
    M. T. Iovchuk (1964). The Philosophy of N. P. Ogarev and Its Place in the History of Russian Revolutionary Thought. Russian Studies in Philosophy 3 (3):27-37.
    December 6, 1963, marked 150 years since the birth of Nikolai Platonovich Ogarev . Ogarev was one of the first in the group of Russia's best sons who, in the dark years of reaction under the serf system, became forerunners of the revolution. Ogarev was distinguished for his diverse gifts and many-sided activity. He was a revolutionist — the organizer of the secret Land and Freedom [Zemlia i Volia] society — and also became known as a lyric poet. He was (...)
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  16.  7
    A. I. Volodin (2000). The Three Ps, or, On Contemporary Versions of the History of Russian Philosophy in the Soviet Period. Russian Studies in Philosophy 39 (2):70-78.
    Let me offer you some reflections of a general nature. My primary objective is to set out at least some of the problems I encountered in my first approaches to this topic. Of course, people can say that a discourse on this topic is premature, that the Soviet period of our history is not even history in the strict sense, at least not for representatives of the generation that passed a good proportion of its creative life in it. (...)
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  17.  8
    James P. Scanlan (1996). A History of Russian Philosophy: From the Tenth Through the Twentieth Centuries. Volumes I and II. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (4):627-629.
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  18.  11
    Marina F. Bykova (2012). A History of Russian Philosophy, 1830–1930: Faith, Reason, and the Defense of Human Dignity (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (4):620-621.
  19. J. P. Scanlan (1996). Valery A. Kuvakin, Ed., A History of Russian Philosophy: From the Tenth Through the Twentieth Centuries. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34:627-628.
     
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  20.  18
    Ernest Gellner (1980). A Russian Marxist Philosophy of History. Theory and Society 9 (5):757-777.
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  21.  19
    George L. Kline (1950). A History of Russian Philosophy. Vol. I. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 47 (9):263-266.
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  22.  14
    George L. Kline (1953). History of Russian Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 50 (22):668-673.
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  23.  12
    Robert G. Turnbull (1955). A History of Russian Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 52 (4):102-108.
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  24. Mariettta T. Stepanyants (ed.) (1993). History of Indian Philosophy: A Russian Viewpoint. Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
     
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  25.  1
    N. O. Lossky (1953). History of Russian Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy 50 (22):668-673.
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  26.  16
    W. Mays (1955). A History of Russian Philosophy. By V. V. Zenkovsky. Authorized Translation From the Russian by George L. Kline. (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd. 1953. Vol. I. Pp. Xiv + 465. Vol II. Pp. Viii + 482. Price £4 4s. The Set.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 30 (113):188-.
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  27.  9
    L. A. R. (1953). Book Review:History of Russian Philosophy N. O. Lossky. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 20 (1):80-.
  28.  10
    John Somerville (1953). Some Perspectives on Russia and the West From the History of Russian Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 13 (3):324-336.
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  29. George L. Kline & V. V. Zenkovsky (1953). A History of Russian Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy 50 (6):183.
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  30. Somerville Somerville (1954). ENKOVSKY'S A History of Russian Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15:276.
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  31. Somerville Somerville (1951). OSSKY'S History of Russian Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 12:577.
     
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  32. V. V. Zenkovsky (1950). A History of Russian Philosophy. Vol. I. Journal of Philosophy 47 (9):263-266.
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  33. V. V. Zenkovsky & George L. Kline (1954). A History of Russian Philosophy. 2 Vols. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (2):276-278.
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  34.  22
    John Hyde (1953). History of Russian Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 3:137-141.
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  35.  11
    Brian Seitz (2012). A History of Russian Philosophy 1830-1930. Philosophical Inquiry 36 (1-2):77-81.
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  36.  6
    David Sider (2007). Philosophy (L.) Zhmud. The Origin of the History of Science in Classical Antiquity, Trans. From Russian by A. Chernoglazov. (Peripatoi 19). Berlin: De Gruyter, 2006. Pp. Xi + 331. 98. 9783110179668. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:241-.
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  37. Philip T. Grier (1994). Valery A. Kuvakin , "A History of Russian Philosophy". Metaphilosophy 25 (2):228.
     
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  38. M. Sapik (1995). Losev, Aleksei, Fedorovich (1893-1988), a Patriarch of Russian Philosophy, Aesthetics, Semiotics and History of Culture. Filozofia 50 (11):615-620.
     
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  39. B. Yakovenko (1995). Dostoevski Weltanschauung-a History of Russian Philosophy. Filozofia 50 (8):452-453.
     
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  40. Stephanie Solywoda (2008). The Life and Work of Semen L. Frank: A Study of Russian Religious Philosophy. Ibidem-Verlag.
     
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  41.  30
    Janusz Dobieszewski (2010). Neoplatonic Tendencies in Russian Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 62 (1):3 - 10.
    The Absolute is a basic and fundamental issue for philosophy as such. I present different concepts of the Absolute (substantialism, energetism, escapism, methodologism). We can say that contemporary European philosophy “orphaned” the neo-Platonic tradition. Thereafter Russian philosophy developed in an intensive and turbulent as well as relatively uniform fashion, in view of the well-established Neo-Platonist context. This makes Russian philosophy not only part of a lasting universally acknowledged tradition; not only has Russian philosophy continued to develop currents (...)
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  42.  17
    Nikolaj Plotnikov (2012). «The Person is a Monad with Windows»: Sketch of a Conceptual History of 'Person' in Russia. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 64 (3-4):269-299.
    The basic concepts 'person' (Person), I/self (Ich) and 'subject' (Subjekt) structuring the Russian discourse of personhood (Personalität) developed during the philosophical discussions of the 1820s-1840s. The development occurred in the course of an intense reception of German Idealism and Romanticism. Characteristic of this process is that the modern meaning of personhood going back to the theological and natural-law interpretations of the person in Western Europe does not exist in the Russian cultural consciousness. Therefore the Russian concepts of (...)
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  43.  3
    A. T. Pavlov (1994). The Question of the Uniqueness of Russian Philosophy. Russian Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):37-49.
    The question of the uniqueness [svoeobrazie] of Russian philosophy and its distinctive features has been around for more than a century. Since the 1840s, when Russian philosophers set about studying the history of philosophical thought in Russia, the question immediately arose as to whether one could speak of Russian philosophy as a distinctive [samobytnoe] and original phenomenon, or whether it would be more correct to speak of philosophy in Russia, i.e., the existence in Russia of philosophical (...)
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  44.  5
    A. A. Galaktionov & P. F. Nikandrov (1967). Slavophilism, its National Roots and its Place in the History of Russian Thought. Russian Studies in Philosophy 6 (2):22-32.
    At present, large teams are at work in virtually all branches of Soviet historical scholarship writing major works of synthesis that present the results of long years of research into the history of literature, economic and political thought, ethics, esthetics, philosophy, and sociology. These works deal with currents that have played any significant role whatever in the history of Russian thought. The greatest attention is given to the Decembrists, the Revolutionary Democrats, the Narodniks, and the Russian (...)
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  45.  36
    A. P. Ogurtsov, S. S. Neretina & M. Assimakopoulos (2005). 20th Century Russian Philosophy Of Science: A Philosophical Discussion. Studies in East European Thought 57 (1):33-60.
    This article is based on a discussion held in Athens in April 2002, in the framework of a research visit, supported by the National Technical University of Athens, among the following participants: Alexander Pavlovits Ogurtsov (APO), Svetlena Sergeevna Neretina (SSN), and Michalis Assimakopoulos (MA) who translated and annotated the Russian text. The later wishes to thank his Russian teachers in philosophy, E.A. Mamchur and language, A.A. Nekrasova The translation was reviewed and emended by E.M. Swiderski, editor of SEET.Svetlana (...)
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  46.  22
    Sergei Prozorov (2008). Russian Postcommunism and the End of History. Studies in East European Thought 60 (3):207 - 230.
    The article ventures a reading of Russian postcommunist politics from the perspective of the messianic turn in continental political philosophy, specifically Giorgio Agamben’s conception of the ‘end of history’. Taking its point of departure from a retrospective construction in the Russian political discourse of the 1990s as a period of ‘timelessness’, the paper argues that postcommunism may indeed be viewed as a paradoxical ‘time out of time’, a rupture in the ordinary temporality that entirely dispenses with the (...)
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  47.  11
    John Ryder (1999). Interpreting America: Russian and Soviet Studies of the History of American Thought. Vanderbilt University Press.
    In his pioneering new book Interpreting America, John Ryder makes available for the first time to English-speaking readers Russian views of the full range of American philosophical thought. Using his own accurate translations, he clearly reconstructs a chain of core ideas, emphasizes the most essential concepts of each writer's work, and gives a multidimensional reconstruction of the arguments of each author.
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  48.  7
    Thomas Seifrid (2005). The Word Made Self: Russian Writings on Language, 1860-1930. Cornell University Press.
    This book will have a lasting impact among readers who will be fascinated to discover the richness of this long-suppressed chapter in the history of Russian ...
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  49.  7
    Alexey Savin, Dmitry Ivanov, Irena Vdovina & Irina Blauberg (2014). The Reception of the Western Thought in Contemporary Russian Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 66 (3 - 4):277-297.
    The article comprises three parts. Part I contains an overview of the areas in the analysis of modern French philosophy that have been of the greatest relevance to Russian researchers over the last years. We conclude that numerous aspects of the French philosophical thought of the twentieth century are well represented in the research of Russian authors, who also point out the emerging trends in its development. Part II deals with the development of analytic philosophy in Russia within (...)
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  50.  5
    Anatoly Chernyaev (2014). Continuity and Succession in Contemporary Russian Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 66 (3 - 4):263-276.
    The article provides a comprehensive view of the problem of continuity and succession in contemporary Russian philosophy by considering the filiation of ideas as well as external factors of historical, socio-cultural, mental, and psychological nature. Examined as well are factors both conducive and detrimental to the continuity and succession of ideas. The major part of the article concerns the most important philosophical schools in contemporary Russia and offers an analysis of their ideological genealogy within the history of (...) and Soviet philosophical thought. (shrink)
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