Search results for 'Philosophy, Tibetan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Shōryū Katsura (ed.) (1999). Dharmakīrti's Thought and its Impact on Indian and Tibetan Philosophy: Proceedings of the Third International Dharmakīrti Conference, Hiroshima, November 4-6, 1997. [REVIEW] Verlag Der Österreichischen Akademie Der Wissenchaften.score: 180.0
  2. Blo-Bzaṅ-Chos-Kyi-Ñi-Ma (1984). A Tibetan Eye-View of Indian Philosophy. Munshiram Manoharlal.score: 132.0
     
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  3. Jonathan Stoltz (2006). Concepts, Intension, and Identity in Tibetan Philosophy of Language. Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 29 (2):383-400.score: 126.0
    This article examines one highly localized set of developments to the Buddhist doctrine of word meaning that was made by twelfth and thirteenth century Tibetan Buddhist epistemologists primarily schooled at gSaṅ phu Monastery in central Tibet. I will show how these thinkers developed the notion of a concept (don spyi) in order to explain how it is that words are capable of applying to real objects, and how concepts can be used to capture elements of word meaning extending beyond (...)
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  4. Thupten Jinpa (2002). Self, Reality and Reason in Tibetan Philosophy: Tsongkhapa's Quest for the Middle Way. Routledgecurzon.score: 126.0
    The work explores the historical and intellectual context of Tsongkhapa's philosophy and addresses the critical issues related to questions of development and originality in Tsongkhapa's thought. It also deals extensively with one of Tsongkhapa's primary concerns, namely his attempts to demonstrate that the Middle Way philosophy's de-constructive analysis does not negate the reality of the everyday world. The study's central focus, however, is the question of the existence and the nature of self. This is explored both in terms of Tsongkhapa's (...)
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  5. Pascale Hugon (forthcoming). Tibetan Epistemology and Philosophy of Language. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 126.0
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  6. Michael Roach (2003). The Tibetan Book of Yoga: Ancient Buddhist Teachings on the Philosophy and Practice of Yoga. Doubleday.score: 126.0
    Yoga came to Tibet from India more than a thousand years ago, and it was quickly absorbed into the culture's rich traditions. In this small book readers will discover Heart Yoga, which developed over the centuries in the Gelukpa tradition of the Dalai Lamas. The program presented here combines popular yoga exercises wtih special Tibetan poses, and methods of working from the inside to give a healthy and a happy heart. Roach discovered a number of previously unknown Tibetan (...)
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  7. H. J. (1999). Georges B. J. Dreyfus Recognizing Reality: Dharmakirti's Philosophy and its Tibetan Interpretations. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997). Pp. 462+Notes, Tibetan-Sanskrit-English Glossary, Bibliography, and Indexes. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 35 (1):113-116.score: 120.0
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  8. J. H. F. (1999). Georges B. J. Dreyfus Recognizing Reality: Dharmakirti's Philosophy and its Tibetan Interpretations. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997). Pp. 462+Notes, Tibetan-Sanskrit-English Glossary, Bibliography, and Indexes. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 35 (1):113-116.score: 120.0
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  9. Elizabeth Napper (1989). Dependent-Arising and Emptiness: A Tibetan Buddhist Interpretation of Mādhyamika Philosophy Emphasizing the Compatibility of Emptiness and Conventional Phenomena. Wisdom Publications.score: 120.0
  10. Guy Newland (1992). The Two Truths in the Mādhyamika Philosophy of the Ge-Luk-Ba Order of Tibetan Buddhism. Snow Lion Publications.score: 120.0
     
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  11. Matthew Kapstein (2001). Reason's Traces: Identity and Interpretation in Indian & Tibetan Buddhist Thought. Wisdom Publications.score: 96.0
    Reason's Traces is a collection of essays by one of the foremost authorities on Indian and Tibetan Buddhism.
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  12. Jonathan Stoltz (2014). The Ethics (and Economics) of Tibetan Polyandry. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 21:601-622.score: 84.0
    Fraternal polyandry—one woman simultaneously being married to two or more brothers—has been a prominent practice within Tibetan agricultural societies for many generations. While the topic of Tibetan polyandry has been widely discussed in the field of anthropology, there are, to my knowledge, no contributions by philosophers on this topic. For this reason alone, my brief analysis of the ethics of Tibetan polyandry will serve to enhance scholars’ understanding of this practice. In this article I examine the factors (...)
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  13. Yaroslav Komarovski (2009). Review of Kenneth Liberman, Dialectical Practice in Tibetan Philosophical Culture: An Ethnomethodological Inquiry Into Formal Reasoning. [REVIEW] Sophia 48 (4):513-515.score: 78.0
    Chapters 4–9 are the most important part of the book. Here Liberman displays his interpretive skills to the fullest. He explores various aspects of directly observed, live debate processes, drawing on the work of Schutz, Husserl, Durkheim (to mention just a few), as well as Buddhist thinkers Nagarjuna, Sakya Pandita, Tsongkhapa, and others. Liberman exhaustively explains the organization and mechanics of debates, the public nature of reasoning, negative dialectics employed by debaters, strategies and techniques such as absurd consequences, hand-claps, ridicule, (...)
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  14. Geoffrey Samuel (2012). Introducing Tibetan Buddhism. Routledge.score: 78.0
     
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  15. Tenzin Wangyal (2012). Awakening the Luminous Mind: Tibetan Meditation for Inner Peace and Joy. Hay House.score: 78.0
     
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  16. Jan Westerhoff, Jay Garfield, Tom Tillemans, Graham Priest, Georges Dreyfus, Sonam Thakchoe, Guy Newland, Mark Siderits, Brownwyn Finnigan & Koji Tanaka (2011). Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd ct CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. One (...)
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  17. Yaroslav Komarovski (2012). Buddhist Contributions to the Question of (Un)Mediated Mystical Experience. Sophia 51 (1):87-115.score: 60.0
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  18. James B. Apple (2013). An Early Tibetan Commentary on Atiśa's Satyadvayāvatāra. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (3):263-329.score: 60.0
    Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna (982–1054 c.e.), more commonly known under his honorific title of Atiśa, is a renowned figure in Tibetan Buddhist cultural memory. He is famous for coming to Tibet and revitalizing Buddhism there during the early eleventh century. Of the many works that Atiśa composed, translated, and brought to Tibet one of the most well-known was his “Entry to the Two Realities” (Satyadvayāvatāra). Recent scholarship has provided translations and Tibetan editions of this work, including Lindtner’s English translation (1981) and (...)
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  19. Stéphane Arguillère (2007). Profusion de la Vaste Sphère: Klong-Chen Rab-'Byams, Tibet, 1308-1364: Sa Vie, Son Œuvre, Sa Doctrine. Peeters.score: 60.0
    L'oeuvre de Klong chen rab 'byams (alias Klong chen pa) a laisse une profonde empreinte dans la culture tibetaine, non seulement en raison de ses qualites proprement philosophiques, mais encore gryce ... sa dimension spirituelle et du fait ...
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  20. Dev Agarwal (ed.) (2012). Unheard Voices and Notes to Myself .. Public Service Broadcasting Trust.score: 60.0
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  21. J. E. Malpas & Robert C. Solomon (eds.) (1998). Death and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Death and Philosophy presents a wide ranging and fascinating variety of different philosophical, aesthetic and literary perspectives on death. Death raises key questions such as whether life has meaning of life in the face of death, what the meaning of "life after death" might be and whether death is part of a narrative that can be retold in different ways, and considers the various types of death, such as brain death, that challenge mind-body dualism. The essays also include explorations of (...)
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  22. Paul Williams (1998). Altruism and Reality: Studies in the Philosophy of the Bodhicaryavatara. Curzon Press.score: 54.0
    This volume brings together Paul Williams's previously published papers on the Indian and Tibetan interpretations of selected verses from the eighth and ninth chapters of the Bodhicaryavatara. In addition, there is a much longer version of the paper 'Identifying the Object of Negation', and nearly half the book consists of a wholly new essay, 'The Absence of Self and the Removal of Pain', subtitled 'How Santideva Destroyed the Bodhisattva Path'. This book will be of interest to those concerned with (...)
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  23. Yaroslav Komarovski (2010). Shakya Chokden's Interpretation of the Ratnagotravibhāga: “Contemplative” or “Dialectical”? [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):441-452.score: 54.0
    This reconciliation of the dialectical and contemplative approaches to the buddha-essence is related to and closely resembles Shakchok’s reconciliation of the two approaches to ultimate reality advocated respectively by Niḥsvabhāvavāda (ngo bo nyid med par smra ba, “Proponents of Entitylessness”) system of Madhyamaka and Alīkākāravāda (rnam rdzun pa, “False Aspectarians”) system of Yogācāra. These approaches in turn are connected respectively to the explicit teachings (dngos bstan) of the second dharmacakra (chos ’khor, “Wheel of Dharma”) and the definitive teachings (nges don, (...)
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  24. Yaroslav Komarovski (2006). Reburying the Treasure—Maintaining the Continuity: Two Texts by Śākya Mchog Ldan on the Buddha-Essence. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (6):521-570.score: 54.0
    The rich and interconnected universe of Śākya Mchog Ldan’s views, including those on the buddha-essence, cannot be limited to or summarized in a few neat categories. Nevertheless, the following two interrelated ideas are crucial for understanding Śākya Mchog Ldan’s interpretation of the buddha-essence: 1) only Mahāyāna āryas (’phags pa) have the buddha-essence characterized by the purity from adventitious stains (glo bur rnam dag).
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  25. Alan Fox, Book Review: In the Mirror of Memory: Reflections on Mindfulness and Remembrance in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism. [REVIEW]score: 54.0
    This book is the outgrowth of a panel of papers on the theme of "memory," presented at the 1987 Annual Meeting of the Buddhism Section of the American Academy of Religion. Four of the contributors to this volume, including Western phenomenologist Edward Casey from SUNY Stony Brook, participated in that panel, though the papers were obviously further developed since that inceptional presentation. The book focusses on the crucial but heretofore almost entirely overlooked topic of memory and remembrance as it appears (...)
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  26. Krishna Del Toso (2011). Il Madhyamakārthasaṃgraha di Bhāviveka: Introduzione, Edizione Del Testo Tibetano E Traduzione Annotata. Esercizi Filosofici 6 (2):369-387.score: 54.0
    Edition of the Tibetan text of the Madhyamakārthasaṃgraha attributed to Bhāviveka (based on the Co-ne, sDe-dge, dGa’-ldan and sNar-thaṅ versions), along with an Italian translation and an introductory philosophical study.
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  27. Douglas Duckworth (2014). How Nonsectarian is ‘Nonsectarian’?: Jorge Ferrer's Pluralist Alternative to Tibetan Buddhist Inclusivism. Sophia 53 (3):339-348.score: 54.0
    This paper queries the logic of the structure of hierarchical philosophical systems. Following the Indian tradition of siddhānta, Tibetan Buddhist traditions articulate a hierarchy of philosophical views. The ‘Middle Way’ philosophy or Madhyamaka—the view that holds that the ultimate truth is emptiness—is, in general, held to be the highest view in the systematic depictions of philosophies in Tibet, and is contrasted with realist schools of thought, Buddhist and non-Buddhist. But why should an antirealist or nominalist position be said to (...)
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  28. Kenneth Liberman (2008). Sophistry In and As Its Course. Argumentation 22 (1):59-70.score: 54.0
    Although sophistry has been characterized as separable from real philosophy, formal analysis does not work without it and one cannot always identify just where philosophy leaves off and sophistry begins. Whether sophistry offers anything to thinking reason has to do with what parties in dialogue do with sophistries. Sophistries can close down or open up philosophical perspectives, depending on the local work that sophistic strategies accomplish. Such local work of philosophers is rarely available to analyses of docile texts, but they (...)
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  29. Pascale Hugon (forthcoming). Text Re-Use in Early Tibetan Epistemological Treatises. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-39.score: 54.0
    This paper examines the modalities and mechanism of text-use pertaining to Indian and Tibetan material in a selection of Tibetan Buddhist epistemological treatises written between the eleventh and the thirteenth century. It pays special attention to a remarkable feature of this corpus: the phenomenon of “repeat,” that is, the unacknowledged integration of earlier material by an author within his own composition. This feature reveals an intellectual continuity in the tradition, and is found even for authors who claim a (...)
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  30. The Cowherds (2011). Moonshadows: Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. OUP USA.score: 54.0
    The doctrine of the two truths - a conventional truth and an ultimate truth - is central to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology. The two truths (or two realities), the distinction between them, and the relation between them is understood variously in different Buddhist schools; it is of special importance to the Madhyamaka school. One theory is articulated with particular force by Nagarjuna (2nd C CE) who famously claims that the two truths are identical to one another and yet distinct. One (...)
     
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  31. Ringu Tulku (2006). The Ri-Me Philosophy of Jamgön Kongtrul the Great: A Study of the Buddhist Lineages of Tibet. Distributed in the United States by Random House.score: 54.0
    This compelling study of the Ri-me movement and of the major Buddhist lineages of Tibet is comprehensive and accessible. It includes an introduction to the history and philosophy of the Ri-me movement; a biography of the movement's leader, the meditation master and philosopher known as Jamgon Kongtrul the Great; helpful summaries of the eight lineages' practice-and-study systems, which point out the different emphases of the schools; an explanation of the most hotly disputed concepts; and an overview of the old and (...)
     
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  32. David Seyfort Ruegg (1967). The Study of Indian and Tibetan Thought. Leiden, E. J. Brill.score: 48.0
    From the earliest period Tibetan scholars attached great importance to the study of these Indian sciences and arts to which they devoted — and still devote — much attention. In fact, even long after the virtual disappearance of Buddhism in ...
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  33. Blo-Bzaṅ-Chos-Kyi-Ñi-Ma (2009). The Crystal Mirror of Philosophical Systems: A Tibetan Study of Asian Religious Thought. Wisdom Publicatiaons.score: 48.0
    Indian schools -- Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism -- The Nyingma tradition -- The Kadam tradition -- The Kagyü tradition -- The Shijé tradition -- The Sakya tradition -- The Jonang and minor traditions -- The Geluk tradition 1: Tsongkhapa -- The Geluk tradition 2: Tsongkhapa's successors -- The Geluk tradition 3: the distinctiveness of Geluk -- The Bon tradition -- Chinese traditions 1: non-Buddhist -- Chinese traditions 2: Buddhist -- Central Asian traditions.
     
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  34. Bsam-Gtan-Chos-ʼphel (2005). Gsaṅ-Sṅags Rñiṅ-Ma Daṅ Gʼyuṅ-Druṅ Bon Gyi Lugs Gñis Las Byuṅ Baʼi Theg Pa Rim Pa Dguʼi Rnam Gźag. Wā-Ṇa Dbus Bod Kyi Ches Mthoʼi Gtsug Lag Slob Gñer Khaṅ.score: 48.0
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  35. Bsam-Gtan-Chos-ʾ & Phel (2005). Gsaṅ-Sṅags Rñiṅ-Ma Daṅ Gʾyuṅ-Druṅ Bon Gyi Lugs Gñis Las Byuṅ Baʾi Theg Pa Rim Pa Dguʾi Rnam Gźag. Wā-Ṇa Dbus Bod Kyi Ches MthoʾI Gtsug Lag Slob Gñer Khaṅ.score: 48.0
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  36. Bsam-Gtan (2009). Rdo-Rje-ʼchaṅ Chen Po Mi Yi Rnam Par Rol Ba Rje Btsun Bsam-Gtan-Rgya-Mtsho-Dpal-Bzaṅ-Po Mchog Gi Gsuṅ ʼbum. [REVIEW] Si-Khron Dpe Skrun Tshogs Pa; Si-Khron Mi Rigs Dpe Skrun Khaṅ.score: 48.0
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  37. Don-Grub-Rgyal (2005). "Brgal Lan Ñi ʼod Zegs Ma" la Phul Baʼi Rtsod Lan Nam Mkhaʼi Kloṅ Chen. Zaṅ-Kaṅ-Then-Mā Dpe Skrun Kuṅ Zi.score: 48.0
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  38. Dmitry Ermakov (2008). Bø and Bön: Ancient Shamanic Traditions of Siberia and Tibet in Their Relation to the Teachings of a Central Asian Buddha. Vajra Publications.score: 48.0
     
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  39. Me-lce (2005). Khu Sim Khad Kyis Dkrog. Kan-SuʼU Mi Rigs Dpe Skrun Khaṅ.score: 48.0
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  40. Jan Christoph Westerhoff, Nāgārjuna. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 42.0
    There is unanimous agreement that Nāgārjuna (ca 150–250 AD) is the most important Buddhist philosopher after the historical Buddha himself and one of the most original and influential thinkers in the history of Indian philosophy. His philosophy of the “middle way” (madhyamaka) based around the central notion of “emptiness” (śūnyatā) influenced the Indian philosophical debate for a thousand years after his death; with the spread of Buddhism to Tibet, China, Japan and other Asian countries the writings of Nāgārjuna became an (...)
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  41. Pascale Hugon (2009). Breaking the Circle. Dharmakīrti's Response to the Charge of Circularity Against the Apoha Theory and its Tibetan Adaptation. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):533-557.score: 42.0
    This paper examines the Buddhist’s answer to one of the most famous (and more intuitive) objections against the semantic theory of “exclusion” ( apoha ), namely, the charge of circularity. If the understanding of X is not reached positively, but X is understood via the exclusion of non-X, the Buddhist nominalist is facing a problem of circularity, for the understanding of X would depend on that of non-X, which, in turn, depends on that of X. I distinguish in this paper (...)
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  42. Roger R. Jackson (1992). The Tibetan Tshogs Zhing (Field of Assembly): General Notes on its Function, Structure and Contents. Asian Philosophy 2 (2):157 – 172.score: 42.0
    Abstract The tshogs zhing, or field of assembly, is an important subject in Tibetan religious art. Typically, it focuses on one's own guru, seated at the crest of a great tree, with the gurus preceding him ranged in the sky above him and the deities of one's tradition ranged on the tree below him. The tshogs zhing is an object of visualisation in Tibetan guru yoga practices, and serves as both a ?map? of the Tibetan sacred cosmos (...)
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  43. James B. Apple (2013). An Early Tibetan Commentary on Atiśa's Satyadvayāvatāra: Diplomatic Edition with Introduction and Notes. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (5):501-533.score: 42.0
    An earlier article (Apple, J Indian Philos 41(3): 263–329, 2013) identified for the first time a brief Tibetan commentary to Atiśa Dīpaṃkaraśrījñāna’s (982–1054 c.e.) well-known “Entry to the Two Realities” (Satyadvayāvatāra) and provided an annotated translation of the work. This article provides an annotated diplomatic edition of the Tibetan commentary. The manuscript of the commentary is a facsimile reprint located in the recently published “Collected Works of the Bka’-gdams-pas” (bka’ gdams gsung ’bum). The early Tibetan commentary to (...)
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  44. Elias Capriles (2008). Heidegger's Misreception of Buddhist Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:31-37.score: 42.0
    Heidegger attempted a “hermeneutics of human experience” that, by switching from the ontic to the ontological dimension, yet maintaining a phenomenological εποχη would bring to light the true meaning of being and, by the same stroke, ascertain the structures of being in human experience. It is now well known that Heidegger drew from Buddhism. However, in human experience being and its structures appear to be ultimately true, and since Heidegger at nopoint went beyond samsara, he failed to realize the phenomenon (...)
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  45. Hiroshi Nemoto (2013). Who is a Proper Opponent? The Tibetan Buddhist Concept of Phyi Rgol Yang Dag. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (2):151-165.score: 42.0
    This paper examines the role of a proper opponent (phyi rgol yang dag) in debate from the standpoint of the Tibetan Buddhist theory of argumentation. A proper opponent is a person who is engaged in the process of truth-seeking. He is not a debater who undertakes to refute the tenets of a proponent. But rather, he is the model debater to whom a proponent can teach truth by using a probative argument in the most effective way. A proper opponent (...)
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  46. Advayavajra (2010). Maitripa's Writings on the View: The Main Indian Source of the Tibetan Views of Other Emptiness and Mahamudra. Padma Karpo Translation Committee.score: 42.0
    Great bliss clarified -- Six verses on co-emergence -- Utterly clear teaching of unification -- Definitive teaching on dreams -- Clear teaching on utter non-dwelling -- Full teaching of suchness -- Six verses on Madhyamaka.
     
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  47. Mdo-sṅags Bstan-paʼi-ñi-ma (2011). Distinguishing the Views and Philosophies: Illuminating Emptiness in a Twentieth-Century Tibetan Buddhist Classic. State University of New York Press.score: 40.0
     
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  48. Mdo-Sṅags Bstan-Paʼ & I.-Ñi-Ma (2011). Distinguishing the Views and Philosophies: Illuminating Emptiness in a Twentieth-Century Tibetan Buddhist Classic. State University of New York Press.score: 40.0
     
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  49. Jay L. Garfield (2006). The Conventional Status of Reflexive Awareness: What's at Stake in a Tibetan Debate? Philosophy East and West 56 (2):201-228.score: 36.0
    ‘Ju Mipham Rinpoche, (1846-1912) an important figure in the _Ris med_, or non- sectarian movement influential in Tibet in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries, was an unusual scholar in that he was a prominent _Nying ma_ scholar and _rDzog_ _chen_ practitioner with a solid dGe lugs education. He took dGe lugs scholars like Tsong khapa and his followers seriously, appreciated their arguments and positions, but also sometimes took issue with them directly. In his commentary to Candrak¥rti’s _Madhyamakåvatåra, _Mi (...)
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  50. Jay L. Garfield (1997). Vasubandhu's Treatise on the Three Natures Translated From the Tibetan Edition with a Commentary. Asian Philosophy 7 (2):133 – 154.score: 36.0
    Trisvabh vanirdeśa (Treatise on the Three Natures) is Vasubandhu's most mature and explicit exposition of the Yogc c ra doctrine of the three natures and their relation to the Buddhist idealism Vasubandhu articulates. Nonetheless there are no extent commentaries on this important short test. The present work provides an introduction to the text, its context and principal philosophical theses; a new translation of the text itself; and a close, verse-by-verse commentary on the text explaining the structure of Yogacara/Cittamatra idealism and (...)
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