Search results for 'Phobia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tatjana Aue, Marie-Eve Hoeppli, Camille Piguet, Virginie Sterpenich & Patrik Vuilleumier (2013). Visual Avoidance in Phobia: Particularities in Neural Activity, Autonomic Responding, and Cognitive Risk Evaluations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    We investigated the neural mechanisms and the autonomic and cognitive responses associated with visual avoidance behavior in spider phobia. Spider phobic and control participants imagined visiting different forest locations with the possibility of encountering spiders, snakes, or birds (neutral reference category). In each experimental trial, participants saw a picture of a forest location followed by a picture of a spider, snake, or bird, and then rated their personal risk of encountering these animals in this context, as well as their (...)
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  2. Karina S. Blair & R. J. R. Blair (2012). A Cognitive Neuroscience Approach to Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Phobia. Emotion Review 4 (2):133-138.score: 15.0
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  3. Reza Pishyar, Lynne M. Harris & Ross G. Menzies (2008). Responsiveness of Measures of Attentional Bias to Clinical Change in Social Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 22 (7):1209-1227.score: 15.0
  4. Kaspar Villadsen & Mitchell Dean (2012). State-Phobia, Civil Society, and a Certain Vitalism. Constellations 19 (3):401-420.score: 15.0
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  5. Iris-Tatjana Kolassa, Stephan Kolassa, Sandra Bergmann, Romy Lauche, Stefan Dilger, Wolfgang Hr Miltner & Frauke Musial (2009). Interpretive Bias in Social Phobia: An ERP Study with Morphed Emotional Schematic Faces. Cognition and Emotion 23 (1):69-95.score: 15.0
  6. Eva Gilboa-Schechtman, Edna B. Foa & Nader Amir (1999). Attentional Biases for Facial Expressions in Social Phobia: The Face-in-the-Crowd Paradigm. Cognition and Emotion 13 (3):305-318.score: 15.0
  7. Fraser N. Watts & Tim Dalgleish (1991). Memory for Phobia-Related Words in Spider Phobics. Cognition and Emotion 5 (4):313-329.score: 15.0
  8. Cathy Creswell, Matt Woolgar, Peter Cooper, Andreas Giannakakis, Elizabeth Schofield, Andrew W. Young & Lynne Murray (2008). Processing of Faces and Emotional Expressions in Infants at Risk of Social Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 22 (3):437-458.score: 15.0
  9. Joanne B. Cuilla (1985). Do MBA Students Have Ethics Phobia. Business and Society Review 53:52-54.score: 15.0
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  10. Karin Elsesser, Iris Heuschen, Ilka Pundt & Gudrun Sartory (2006). Attentional Bias and Evoked Heart-Rate Response in Specific Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1092-1107.score: 15.0
  11. K. Elsesser, I. Heuschen, I. Pundt & G. Sartory (2006). Attentional Bias and Evoked Heart-Rate Response in Specific Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1092-1107.score: 15.0
  12. Matthias Gamer, Heiko Hecht, Nina Seipp & Wolfgang Hiller (2011). Who is Looking at Me? The Cone of Gaze Widens in Social Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 25 (4):756-764.score: 15.0
  13. Michiyo Hirai & Laura Vernon (2011). The Role of Disgust Propensity in Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia: Comparisons Between Asian Americans and Caucasian Americans. Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1500-1509.score: 15.0
  14. Martin F. Kilmer (1982). Genital Phobia and Depilation: (Plates I, IIa, B). Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:104-112.score: 15.0
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  15. Iris-Tatjana Kolassa, Stephan Kolassa, Frauke Musial & Wolfgang Hr Miltner (2007). Event-Related Potentials to Schematic Faces in Social Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 21 (8):1721-1744.score: 15.0
  16. Christopher Lane (2006). How Shyness Became an Illness a Brief History of Social Phobia. Common Knowledge 12 (3):388-409.score: 15.0
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  17. Maryanne Martin, Pauline Horder & Gregory V. Jones (1992). Integral Bias in Naming of Phobia-Related Words. Cognition and Emotion 6 (6):479-486.score: 15.0
  18. Jan Mohlman, Jennifer Mangels & Michelle Craske (2004). The Spider Phobia Card Sorting Test: An Investigation of Phobic Fear and Executive Functioning. Cognition and Emotion 18 (7):939-960.score: 15.0
  19. R. M. Rapee & R. G. Heimberg (1997). Responsiveness of Measures of Attentional Bias to Clinical Change in Social Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 22:1209-1227.score: 15.0
  20. Anne Schienle, Axel Schäfer, Bertram Walter, Rudolf Stark & Dieter Vaitl (2005). Elevated Disgust Sensitivity in Blood Phobia. Cognition and Emotion 19 (8):1229-1241.score: 15.0
  21. Jerome Neu (1995). &Quot;does the Professor Talk to God?&Quot;: Learning From Little Hans. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (2):137-161.score: 9.0
    This essay argues that Freud’s case of Little Hans, while complicated by Hans’ father’s dual role in the analysis and in the Oedipal drama itself, provides valuable insight into the nature of psychoanalytic evidence and argument. The case provides direct, if sometimes ambiguous, evidence concerning primal phantasies and infantile sexuality--issues of universality, the role of experience, and the nature of phantasy are explored. Four strands of Freud’s analysis of Little Hans’ horse phobia are also explored. While the toxicological theory (...)
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  22. Hadas Okon-Singer Tatjana Aue, Raphaël Guex, Léa A. S. Chauvigné (2013). Varying Expectancies and Attention Bias in Phobic and Non-Phobic Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 9.0
    Phobic individuals display an attention bias to phobia-related information and biased expectancies regarding the likelihood of being faced with such stimuli. Notably, although attention and expectancy biases are core features in phobia and anxiety disorders, these biases have mostly been investigated separately and their causal impact has not been examined. We hypothesized that these biases might be causally related. Spider phobic and low spider fearful control participants performed a visual search task in which they specified whether the deviant (...)
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  23. Graham C. L. Davey (1995). Preparedness and Phobias: Specific Evolved Associations or a Generalized Expectancy Bias? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):289.score: 7.0
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  24. Dominic Murphy (2005). Can Evolution Explain Insanity? Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):745-766.score: 6.0
    I distinguish three evolutionary explanations of mental illness: first, breakdowns in evolved computational systems; second, evolved systems performing their evolutionary function in a novel environment; third, evolved personality structures. I concentrate on the second and third explanations, as these are distinctive of an evolutionary psychopathology, with progressively less credulity in the light of the empirical evidence. General morals are drawn for evolutionary psychiatry.
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  25. Elisabeth Pacherie (1994). Holophobia. Acta Analytica 12 (12):105-112.score: 6.0
    Holophobia can be defined as the 'neurotic' fear that semantic holism, if not instantly extirpated by the most radical means, might be a deadly threat to intentional realism. I contend that Fodor exaggerates the threat that meaning holism poses to intentional realism and to a viable account of narrow content in terms of conceptual roles. He particular, he overestimates the relevance for intentional psychology of Quine's demonstration that a substantial analytic/synthetic distinction is out of reach.I argue that all that is (...)
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  26. Allison M. Waters & Ottmar V. Lipp (2008). Visual Search for Emotional Faces in Children. Cognition and Emotion 22 (7):1306-1326.score: 6.0
    The ability to rapidly detect facial expressions of anger and threat over other salient expressions has adaptive value across the lifespan. Although studies have demonstrated this threat superiority effect in adults, surprisingly little research has examined the development of this process over the childhood period. In this study, we examined the efficiency of children's facial processing in visual search tasks. In Experiment 1, children (N=49) aged 8 to 11 years were faster and more accurate in detecting angry target faces embedded (...)
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  27. Wolf-Gero Lange, Mike Rinck & Eni S. Becker (2013). To Be or Not to Be Threatening, but What Was the Question? Biased Face Evaluation in Social Anxiety and Depression Depends on How You Frame the Query. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 6.0
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  28. H. T. Woolley (1922). Personality Studies of Three-Year-Olds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (6):381.score: 6.0
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  29. Jack B. Nitschke Deborah L. Kerr, Donald G. McLaren, Robin M. Mathy (2012). Controllability Modulates the Anticipatory Response in the Human Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 6.0
    Research has consistently shown that control is critical to psychological functioning, with perceived lack of control considered to play a crucial role in the manifestation of symptoms in psychiatric disorders. In a model of behavioral control based on nonhuman animal work, Maier and colleagues posited that the presence of control activates areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which in turn inhibit the normative stress response in the dorsal raphe nucleus and amygdala. To test Maier’s model in humans, we investigated (...)
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  30. José Gustavo de Souza Paiva, Alexandre Cardoso & Edgard Lamounier Jr (2007). Uma proposta para o tratamento de fobias de direção através da criação de rotas automotivas virtuais. Aletheia 25:97-108.score: 6.0
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  31. N. Vriends, M. C. Pfaltz, P. Novianti & J. Hadiyono (2013). Taijin Kyofusho and Social Anxiety and Their Clinical Relevance in Indonesia and Switzerland. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 6.0
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  32. Peter J. de Jong & Harald Merckelbach (1997). No Convincing Evidence for a Biological Preparedness Explanation of Phobias. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):362-363.score: 5.0
    The nonrandom distribution of fears is not as clearly related to phylogenetically survival relevance as preparedness theory seems to imply. Although delayed extinction reflects some of the best human evidence for preparedness, even this phenomenon is not as robust as it once seemed to be. Apart from the evidence reviewed by Davey, recent studies from our laboratory provide further evidence for an expectancy bias model of selective associations.
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  33. Richard J. McNally (1995). Preparedness, Phobias, and the Panglossian Paradigm. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):303.score: 5.0
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  34. V. Lipp Ottmar (2012). The "Weaker" Conditioning Paradigm: Differences in Fear Learning and the Propensity to Develop Phobias. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 5.0
  35. Fyodor Lukyanov (forthcoming). America as the Mirror of Russian Phobias. Social Research.score: 5.0
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  36. Lin Manhong (2009). Social Phobias in World History. Chinese Studies in History 42 (4):63-77.score: 5.0
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  37. Tony Savage (2011). Can Robots Have Phobias?: The Synthetic Modeling of Psychological Abnormality. Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (1):60-91.score: 5.0
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  38. Mick Smith & Joyce Davidson (2006). &Lsquo; It Makes My Skin Crawl... &Rsquo;: The Embodiment of Disgust in Phobias of &Lsquo; Nature&Rsquo. Body and Society 12 (1).score: 5.0
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  39. B. Cuthbert, Pj de Jong, H. Merckelbach & Gcl Davey (1997). Preparedness and Phobias: Specific Evolved Associations or a Generalized Expectancy Bias. Commentary. Author's Response. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):361-364.score: 5.0
     
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  40. Graham C. L. Davey (1995). Expectancy Bias and Phobias: Accounting for the Uneven Distribution of Fears and the Characteristics of Clinical Phobias. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):315.score: 5.0
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  41. Graham C. L. Davey (1997). The Merits of an Experimentally Testable Model of Phobias. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):363-364.score: 5.0
    A series of arguments are presented by De Jong & Merckelbach which suggest that biological preparedness has been received significantly less critically than it should have been. I agree fully with their assessment. Cuthbert raises four questions about the applicability of the expectancy bias hypothesis to selective associations in human conditioning. This response argues that none of these four examples is necessarily problematic for the hypothesis.
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  42. Luc Faucher & Isabelle Blanchette (2011). Fearing New Dangers: Phobias and the Cognitive Complexity of Human Emotions. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 5.0
     
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  43. Arne Öhman (1995). Eggs in More Than One Basket: Mediating Mechanisms Between Evolution and Phobias. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):310.score: 5.0
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  44. Peter F. Lovibond, David A. T. Siddle & Nigel W. Bond (1995). Why Are Phobias Irrational? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):303.score: 5.0
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  45. Ross G. Menzies (1995). The Uneven Distribution of Fears and Phobias: A Nonassociative Account. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):305.score: 5.0
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  46. John Price (1986). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias. A Cognitive Perspective. By Aaron T. Beck and Gary Emery. (Basic Books, New York, 1985.). Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (3):374-375.score: 5.0
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  47. Mick Smith & Joyce Davidson (2006). It Makes My Skin Crawl...': The Embodiment of Disgust in Phobias of 'Nature. Body and Society 12 (1):43-67.score: 5.0
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  48. E. N. Sokolov (1995). Phobias and Anxiety in the Framework of the Defense Reflex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):313.score: 5.0
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  49. Rosemary Lowry (2012). Reasons for Action and Psychological Capacities. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (4):521 - 531.score: 3.0
    Most moral philosophers agree that if a moral agent is incapable of performing some act ϕ because of a physical incapacity, then they do not have a reason to ϕ. Most also claim that if an agent is incapable of ϕ-ing due to a psychological incapacity, brought about by, for example, an obsession or phobia, then this does not preclude them from having a reason to ϕ. This is because the 'ought implies can' principle is usually interpreted as a (...)
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  50. Dr H. Stefan Bracha (2006). Human Brain Evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-Depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of Fear-Circuitry-Related Traits in Dsm-V and for Studying Resilience to Warzone-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Philosophical Explorations.score: 3.0
    The DSM-III, DSM-IV, DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 have judiciously minimized discussion of etiologies to distance clinical psychiatry from Freudian psychoanalysis. With this goal mostly achieved, discussion of etiological factors should be reintroduced into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-V). A research agenda for the DSM-V advocated the "development of a pathophysiologically based classification system". The author critically reviews the neuroevolutionary literature on stress-induced and fear circuitry disorders and related amygdala-driven, species-atypical fear behaviors of clinical severity in (...)
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