Search results for 'Phronesis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jessica Moss (2011). >Virtue Makes the Goal Right: Virtue and Phronesis in Aristotles Ethics. Phronesis 56 (3):204-261.score: 27.0
    Aristotle repeatedly claims that character-virtue “makes the goal right“, while Phronesis is responsible for working out how to achieve the goal. Many argue that these claims are misleading: it must be intellect that tells us what ends to pursue. I argue that Aristotle means just what he seems to say: despite putative textual evidence to the contrary, virtue is (a) a wholly non-intellectual state, and (b) responsible for literally supplying the contents of our goals. Furthermore, there are no good (...)
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  2. Fredrik Svenaeus (2003). Hermeneutics of Medicine in the Wake of Gadamer: The Issue of Phronesis. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):407-431.score: 24.0
    The relevance of the Aristotelian concept ofphronesis – practical wisdom – for medicine and medical ethics has been much debated during the last two decades. This paper attempts to show how Aristotle’s practical philosophy was of central importance toHans-Georg Gadamer and to the development of his philosophical hermeneutics, and how,accordingly, the concept of phronesiswill be central to a Gadamerian hermeneutics of medicine. If medical practice is conceived of as an interpretative meeting between doctor and patient with the aim of restoring (...)
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  3. John Wall (2003). Phronesis, Poetics, and Moral Creativity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (3):317-341.score: 24.0
    At least since Aristotle, phronesis (practical wisdom) and poetics (making or creating) have been understood as essentially different activities, one moral the other (in itself) non-moral. Today, if anything, this distinction is sharpened by a Romantic association of poetics with inner subjective expression. Recent revivals of Aristotelian ethics sometimes allow for poetic dimensions of ethics, but these are still separated from practical wisdom per se. Through a fresh reading of phronesis in the French hermeneutical phenomenologist Paul Ricoeur, I (...)
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  4. Chris W. Surprenant (2012). Politics and Practical Wisdom: Rethinking Aristotle's Account of Phronesis. Topoi 31 (2):221-227.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the nature of Aristotelian phronesis , how it is attained, and who is able to attain it inside the polis . I argue that, for Aristotle, attaining phronesis does not require an individual to perfect his practical wisdom to the point where he never makes a mistake, but rather it is attained by certain individuals who are unable to make a mistake of this kind due to their education, habituation, and position in society.
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  5. Stephen Tyreman (2000). Promoting Critical Thinking in Health Care: Phronesis and Criticality. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):117-124.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the notion of ‘expert’ health care practitioner in the context of critical thinking and health care education where scientific rather than philosophical inquiry has been the dominant mode of thought. A number of factors have forced are appraisal in this respect: the challenge brought about by the identification of complex ethical issues in clinical situations; medicine's `solving' of many of the simple health problems; the recognition that uncertainty is a common and perhaps innate feature of clinical practice; (...)
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  6. Roberto Wu (2011). A ontologia da Phronesis: a leitura heideggeriana da ética de Aristóteles. Veritas 56 (1).score: 24.0
    O artigo discute conceitos da filosofia prática de Aristóteles e sua apropriação por Heidegger no período dos anos 1920. Para isso, o autor explora a interpretação heideggeriana do conceito de totalidade e sua relação com o particular, a fim de caracterizar a situação concreta como o solo hermenêutico das relações de compreensão. Investiga-se a conexão interna dos conceitos que se referem à praxis em Aristóteles, destacando-se a importância da phronesis na sua retomada ontológica por Heidegger. O artigo encerra indicando (...)
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  7. Nowys Navas (2012). Phrónesis y Hermenéutica. Apuntes Filosóficos 21 (40).score: 24.0
    En este artículo desplegaremos los supuestos que conducen a la rehabilitación del pensamiento de Aristóteles por parte de Gadamer, la cual tiene como eje central a la phrónesis aristotélica interpretada en vista del horizonte de la comprensión hermenéutica. Phronesis and HermeneuticsIn this article we will expound the assumptions that lead to the rehabilitation of Aristotle's thought by Gadamer, which has the Aristotelian phronesis as a core concept, interpreted in light of the horizon of hermeneutic understanding.
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  8. Christopher P. Long (2002). The Ontological Reappropriation of Phronēsis. Continental Philosophy Review 35 (1):35-60.score: 21.0
    Ontology has been traditionally guided by sophia, a form of knowledge directed toward that which is eternal, permanent, necessary. This tradition finds an important early expression in the philosophical ontology of Aristotle. Yet in the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle's intense concern to do justice to the world of finite contingency leads him to develop a mode of knowledge, phronsis, that implicitly challenges the hegemony of sophia and the economy of values on which it depends. Following in the tradition of the early (...)
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  9. Garrett K. Chan (2005). Understanding End‐of‐Life Caring Practices in the Emergency Department: Developing Merleau‐Ponty's Notions of Intentional Arc and Maximum Grip Through Praxis and Phronesis. Nursing Philosophy 6 (1):19-32.score: 21.0
  10. Kristjan Kristjansson (2005). Smoothing It: Some Aristotelian Misgivings About the Phronesis‐Praxis Perspective on Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (4):455-473.score: 21.0
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  11. Don Flaming (2001). Using Phronesis Instead of 'Research-Based Practice' as the Guiding Light for Nursing Practice. Nursing Philosophy 2 (3):251-258.score: 21.0
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  12. F. Daniel Davis (1997). Phronesis, Clinical Reasoning, and Pellegrino's Philosophy of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).score: 18.0
    In terms of Aristotle's intellectual virtues, the process of clinical reasoning and the discipline of clinical medicine are often construed as techne (art), as episteme (science), or as an amalgam or composite of techne and episteme. Although dimensions of process and discipline are appropriately described in these terms, I argue that phronesis (practical reasoning) provides the most compelling paradigm, particularly of the rationality of the physician's knowing and doing in the clinical encounter with the patient. I anchor this argument, (...)
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  13. Shaun Gallagher (1993). The Place of Phronesis in Postmodern Hermeneutics. Philosophy Today 37 (3):298-305.score: 18.0
    The conception of paralogy, which <span class='Hi'>Jean-Francois</span> Lyotard develops in The Postmodern Condition, motivates a number of questions concerning justice and the moral life. In this paper I suggest that Lyotard's account fails to provide an adequate answer to these questions, and that a more satisfactory account of justice in paralogy can be developed by exploring the concept of phronesis. John Caputo's "ethics of dissemination," in some respects, leads us in this direction. Although both theorists attempt to develop their (...)
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  14. B. Hofman (2002). Medicine as Practical Wisdom ( Phronesis ). Poiesis and Praxis 1 (2):135-149.score: 18.0
    Modern medicine faces fundamental challenges that various approaches to the philosophy of medicine have tried to address. One of these approaches is based on the ancient concept of phronesis. This paper investigates whether this concept can be used as a moral basis for the challenges facing modern medicine and, in particular, analyses phronesis as it is applied in the works of Pellegrino and Thomasma. It scrutinises some difficulties with a phronesis-based theory, specifically, how it presupposes a moral (...)
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  15. Eric B. Beresford (1996). Can Phronesis Save the Life of Medical Ethics? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (3).score: 18.0
    There has been a growing interest in casuistry since the ground breaking work of Jonsen and Toulmin. Casuistry, in their view, offers the possibility of securing the moral agreement that policy makers desire but which has proved elusive to theory driven approaches to ethics. However, their account of casuistry is dependent upon the exercise of phronesis. As recent discussions of phronesis make clear, this requires attention not only to the particulars of the case, but also to the substantive (...)
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  16. Olav Eikeland (2008). The Ways of Aristotle: Aristotelian Phrónêsis, Aristotelian Philosophy of Dialogue, and Action Research. Peter Lang.score: 18.0
    This book is a meticulous study of Aristotle's phronesis and its applications to the fields of personal development or character formation and of ethical ...
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  17. Thomas P. Hohler (2007). Phronēsis Transformed: From Aristotle to Heidegger to Ricoeur. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):347-372.score: 18.0
    The article begins with Aristotle’s discussion of phronēsis for ethical life, only to discover the absence of a universal dimension. This issue of parochialism as opposed to a kind of universalism is a structural element of this paper. Secondly, Heidegger’s ontological interpretation of phronēsis creatively transforms phronēsis to highlight a tension between ethics and fundamental ontology—a tension overcome in the paper’s third section devoted to Ricoeur. Thus, Ricoeur’s post-critical phronēsis is shown to possess a universal dimension while disclosing ontologically. Phronēsis (...)
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  18. D. S. Schultz & L. V. Flasher (2011). Charles Taylor, Phronesis, and Medicine: Ethics and Interpretation in Illness Narrative. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (4):394-409.score: 18.0
    This paper provides a brief overview and critique of the dominant objectivist understanding and use of illness narrative in Enlightenment (scientific) medicine and ethics, as well as several revisionist accounts, which reflect the evolution of this approach. In light of certain limitations and difficulties endemic in the objectivist understanding of illness narrative, an alternative phronesis approach to medical ethics influenced by Charles Taylor’s account of the interpretive nature of human agency and language is examined. To this end, the account (...)
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  19. Glenn Mcgee (1996). Phronesis in Clinical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (4).score: 18.0
    This essay argues that while we have examined clinical ethics quite extensively in the literature, too little attention has been paid to the complex question of how clinical ethics is learned. Competing approaches to ethics pedagogy have relied on outmoded understandings of the way moral learning takes place in ethics. It is argued that the better approach, framed in the work of Aristotle, is the idea of phronesis, which depends on a long-term mentorship in clinical medicine for either medical (...)
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  20. Sean Drysdale Walsh (2012). Kant's Theory of Right as Aristotelian Phronesis. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):227-246.score: 18.0
    Many philosophers believe that a moral theory, given all the relevant facts, should be able to determine what is morally right and wrong. It is commonly argued that Aristotle’s ethical theory suffers from a fatal flaw: it places responsibility for determining right and wrong with the virtuous agent who has phronesis rather than with the theory itself. It is also commonly argued that Immanuel Kant’s ethical theory does provide a concept of right that is capable of determining right and (...)
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  21. Bronwyn Finnigan (2014). Phronēsis in Aristotle: Reconciling Deliberation with Spontaneity. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (1).score: 18.0
    A standard thesis of contemporary Aristotelian virtue ethics and some recent Heideggerian scholarship is that virtuous behavior can be performed immediately and spontaneously without engaging conscious processes of deliberative thought. It is also claimed that phronēsis either enables or is consistent with this possibility. In the Nicomachean Ethics, however, Aristotle identifies phronēsis as the excellence of the calculative part of the intellect, claims that calculation and deliberation are the same and that it is the mark of the phronimos to be (...)
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  22. Stein M. Wivestad (2008). The Educational Challenges of Agape and Phronesis. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):307-324.score: 18.0
    Children as learners need adults who love them, even when the children are unable to give anything in return. Furthermore, adults should be able to make wise judgements concerning what is good for the children. The clarification of these principles and of their educational import has to start within our own cultural tradition. Agape (unconditional love, neighbour-love or charity) is a basic concept in the Christian tradition. Phronesis (moral wisdom, practical judgement or prudence) has a key position in the (...)
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  23. Regina Queiroz (2012). The Importance of Phronesis as Communal Business Ethics Reasoning Principle. Philosophy of Management 11 (2):49-61.score: 18.0
    In this article I maintain the importance of the Aristotelian concept of prudence or phronesis applied to business ethics, distinguishing its meaning from Solomon and Hartman’s approaches to Aristotelian business ethics. Whereas Solomon stresses the value of perception of particulars and Hartman criticizes the incapacity of Aristotelian phronesis to dwell with the interests of others, I advocate that Aristotelian virtue ethics is important because the concept of phronesisdoes three things: (a) stresses the rational calculation and general principles or (...)
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  24. Danielle Lories (2013). La phronesis du sage stoicien. Areté. Revista de Filosofía 11 (1-2):219 - 244.score: 18.0
    The traditional image of the stoic sage, retired and solitary, indifferent to all that does not "rely" on him, and thus to the most part of events that mark the course of the world and of human lives, is a simplistic view that ought to be reconsidered. To do so, we try to show that the virtue borrowed from the sophos by the texts of ancient stoicism has indeed the traits of the Aristotelian phronesis, political excellence and thus virtue (...)
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  25. Matthew C. Weidenfeld (2011). Heidegger's Appropriation of Aristotle: Phronesis, Conscience, and Seeing Through the One. European Journal of Political Theory 10 (2):254-276.score: 18.0
    This article attempts to show that Heidegger’s phenomenology may shed light on political phenomena. It pursues this project by arguing that Heidegger’s phenomenology is an appropriation of Aristotle’s practical philosophy and his conceptualization of phronesis. I argue that, in Being and Time, Heidegger’s ‘circumspection’, which is a capacity for making sense of practical situations, is a translation of phronesis. Heidegger argues, though, that the sight of circumspection is foreshortened by the rules and norms of ‘the one’. In division (...)
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  26. Robert Bernasconi (1990). Heidegger's Destruction of Phronesis. Southern Journal of Philosophy 28 (S1):127-147.score: 15.0
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  27. Sarah Broadie (1987). Nature, Craft and Phronesis in Aristotle. Philosophical Topics 15 (2):35-50.score: 15.0
  28. Walter Brogan (1990). A Response to Robert Bernasconi's “Heidegger's Destruction of Phronesis”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 28 (S1):149-153.score: 15.0
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  29. Erik Falkum (2009). Phronesis and Techne: The Debate on Evidence-Based Medicine in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (2):141-149.score: 15.0
  30. Ricardo Blaug (2000). Citizenship and Political Judgment: Between Discourse Ethics and Phronesis. Res Publica 6 (2):179-198.score: 15.0
    Political judgment is notoriously hard to theorise, and in the recent debates surrounding Habermas's discourse ethics we encounter classic disagreements around the nature, operation and validity of such judgments. This paper evaluates Habermas's account of political judgment and explores the problems raised by his critics. It then focuses on the contentious role played by universals within his account. What emerges is a reformulated theory of judgment based on the thin universalism of fair deliberation, and a description of a sub-set of (...)
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  31. Greg Koski (2010). “Rethinking Research Ethics,” Again: Casuistry, Phronesis, and the Continuing Challenges of Human Research. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (10):37-39.score: 15.0
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  32. Helgard Mahrdt (2007). Phronēsis bei Aristoteles und Hannah Arendt. Von der Sorge um das Leben und das Selbst zur Sorge um die Welt. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 55 (4):587-603.score: 15.0
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  33. Jana Noel (1999). Phronesis and Phantasia: Teaching with Wisdom and Imagination. Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (2):277–286.score: 15.0
  34. Roger A. Shiner (1979). Aisthēsis, Nous and Phronēsis in the Practical Syllogism. Philosophical Studies 36 (4):377 - 387.score: 15.0
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  35. Ronald M. Polansky (2000). "Phronesis" on Tour: Cultural Adaptability of Aristotelian Ethical Notions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (4):323-336.score: 15.0
    : How might bioethics take account of cultural diversity? Can practical wisdom of an Aristotelian sort be applied across cultures? After showing that practical wisdom involves both intellectual cleverness and moral virtue, it is argued that both these components have universality. Hence practical wisdom must be universal as well. Hellenic ethical thought neither depended on outdated theoretical notions nor limited itself to the Greek world, but was in fact developed with constant awareness of cultural differences, so it arguably works as (...)
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  36. Arash Abizadeh (2002). The Passions of the Wise: "Phronêsis", Rhetoric, and Aristotle's Passionate Practical Deliberation. Review of Metaphysics 56 (2):267 - 296.score: 15.0
  37. James Arnt Aune (2008). Modernity as a Rhetorical Problem: Phronēsis , Forms, and Forums in Norms of Rhetorical Culture. Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (4):pp. 402-420.score: 15.0
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  38. Don Flaming RN MN PhD student Calgary) (2001). Using Phronesis Instead of 'Research-Based Practice' as the Guiding Light for Nursing Practice. Nursing Philosophy 2 (3):251–258.score: 15.0
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  39. William Desmond (1980). Phronesis and the Categorical Imperative. Philosophical Studies 27:7-15.score: 15.0
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  40. Daniel L. Smith (2003). Intensifying Phronesis: Heidegger, Aristotle, and Rhetorical Culture. Philosophy and Rhetoric 36 (1):77 - 102.score: 15.0
  41. Jim Mackenzie (1991). Street Phronesis. Journal of Philosophy of Education 25 (2):153–169.score: 15.0
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  42. Jane O'dea (1993). Phronesis in Musical Performance. Journal of Philosophy of Education 27 (2):233–243.score: 15.0
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  43. Hans Pedersen (2010). On Heidegger's Appropriation of Aristotle's Concept of Phronesis. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10:217-235.score: 15.0
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  44. Robert A. Reeves (1995). Back to the Rough Ground: 'Phronesis' and 'Techne' in Modern Philosophy and in Aristotle. Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):245-248.score: 15.0
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  45. Pierluigi Donini (2003). Mimèsis tragique et apprentissage de la phronèsis. Les Études Philosophiques 4 (4):436-450.score: 15.0
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  46. Shaun Gallagher (2013). Phronesis and Psychopathy: The Moral Frame Problem. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (4):345-348.score: 15.0
  47. Bennett Reimer (forthcoming). Episteme, Phronesis, and the Role of Verbal Language in" Knowing Within" Music. Philosophy of Music Education Review 5 (2).score: 15.0
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  48. Susan Zickmund (2007). Deliberation, Phronesis, and Authenticity: Heidegger's Early Conception of Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 40 (4):406 - 415.score: 15.0
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  49. Richard Bodéüs (1988). The Fragments of Parmenides A Critical Text with Introduction, Translation, the Ancient Testimonia and a Commentary A. H. Coxon Phronesis, Suppl. Vol. 3 Assen/Maastricht, The Netherlands; Wolfeboro, NH: Van Gorcum, 1986. Pp. Viii, 277. $30.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Dialogue 27 (03):563-.score: 15.0
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  50. J. D. Goldstein (2004). The `Bees Problem' in Hegel's Political Philosophy: Habit, Phronesis and Experience of the Good. History of Political Thought 25 (3):481-507.score: 15.0
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