Search results for 'Physical laws' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  47
    Jean E. Burns (1999). Volition and Physical Laws. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (10):27-47.
    The concept of free will is central to our lives, as we make day-to-day decisions, and to our culture, in our ethical and legal systems. The very concept implies that what we choose can produce a change in our physical environment, whether by pressing a switch to turn out electric lights or choosing a long-term plan of action which can affect many people. Yet volition is not a part of presently known physical laws and it is not (...)
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  2. Ecological Laws, Ecological Laws.
    The question of whether there are laws in ecology is important for a number of reasons. If, as some have suggested, there are no ecological laws, this would seem to distinguish ecology from other branches of science, such as physics. It could also make a difference to the methodology of ecology. If there are no laws to be discovered, ecologists would seem to be in the business of merely supplying a suite of useful models. These models would (...)
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  3.  11
    David Brooks (1980). The Impossibility of Psycho-Physical Laws. Philosophical Papers 9 (October):21-45.
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  4.  75
    Marcel Weber (2008). Causes Without Mechanisms: Experimental Regularities, Physical Laws, and Neuroscientific Explanation. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):995-1007.
    This article examines the role of experimental generalizations and physical laws in neuroscientific explanations, using Hodgkin and Huxley’s electrophysiological model from 1952 as a test case. I show that the fact that the model was partly fitted to experimental data did not affect its explanatory status, nor did the false mechanistic assumptions made by Hodgkin and Huxley. The model satisfies two important criteria of explanatory status: it contains invariant generalizations and it is modular (both in James Woodward’s sense). (...)
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  5. John T. Roberts (2005). Measurability and Physical Laws. Synthese 144 (3):433Ð447.
    I propose and motivate a new account of fundamental physical laws, the Measurability Account of Laws (MAL). This account has a distinctive logical form, in that it takes the primary nomological concept to be that of a law relative to a given theory, and defines a law simpliciter as a law relative to some true theory. What makes a proposition a law relative to a theory is that it plays an indispensable role in demonstrating that some quantity (...)
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  6.  21
    Erik Weber & Merel Lefevere (2014). The Role of Unification in Micro-Explanations of Physical Laws. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 29 (1):41-56.
    In the literature on scientific explanation, there is a classical distinction between explanations of particular facts and explanations of laws. This paper is about explanations of laws, more specifically about microexplanations of laws in physics. We investigate whether providing unificatory information has a surplus value in micro-explanations of physical laws. Unificatory information is information that provides ontological unification in the sense defined by Uskali Mäki. We argue that providing unificatory information may lead to explanations with (...)
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  7.  14
    Attila Grandpierre (2002). The Fundamental Principles of Existence and the Origin of Physical Laws. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 25 (2):127-147.
    Our concept of the universe and the material world is foundational for our thinking and our moral lives. In an earlier contribution to the URAM project I presented what I called 'the ultimate organizational principle' of the universe. In that article (Grandpierre 2000, pp. 12-35) I took as an adversary the wide-spread system of thinking which I called 'materialism'. According to those who espouse this way of thinking, the universe consists of inanimate units or sets of material such as atoms (...)
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  8.  39
    D. L. Wilson (1999). Mind-Brain Interactionism and the Violation of Physical Laws. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):8-9.
    If mind is not a part of the physical universe but is able to influence brain events, then violations of physical laws should occur at points of such mental influence. Using current knowledge of how the nervous system functions, the minimal necessary magnitude of such violations is examined. A variety of influences that could produce action potentials is considered, including the direct opening of sodium channels in membranes, the triggering of release of neurotransmitter at synapses, the opening (...)
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  9.  14
    E. Kaeser (1977). Physical Laws, Physical Entities and Ontology. Dialectica 31 (3‐4):273-299.
    We investigate the way physical laws objectively refer to the entities they are about. Laws of mathematical physics do not refer directly to the “real world” but to an ideal specific domain of objects, which we term “scope”. In order to find out which real objects physical laws deal with, reference to the scope is not sufficient. We need in addition the search for domains to which laws apply — i. e. “empirical domains”— in (...)
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  10.  5
    J. T. Whyte (1990). The Psycho-Physical Laws of Intentionality. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (3):295 – 304.
    Abstract Intentional mental states have causes and effects. Davidson has shown that this fact alone does not entail the existence of psycho?physical laws, but his anomalism makes the connection between the content and causation of intentional states utterly mysterious. By defining intentional states in terms of their causes and effects, functionalism promises to explain this connection. If intentional states have their causes and effects in virtue of their contents, then there must be intrinsic states (of the people who (...)
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  11. David L. Wilson (2015). Nonphysical Souls Would Violate Physical Laws. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield 349-367.
    This paper argues that nonphysical souls would violate fundamental physical laws if they were able to influence brain events. Though we have no idea how nonphysical souls might operate, we know quite a bit about how brains work, so we can consider each of the ways that an external force could interrupt brain processes enough to control one’s body. It concludes that there is no way that a nonphysical soul could interact with the brain—neither by introducing new energy (...)
     
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  12.  90
    E. Schmutzer (1971). Symmetries in the Physical Laws of Nature. Scientia 106 (6):66-76.
    According to the great discovery by e. noether in 1918 there exists an intrinsic connection between the mathematical symmetries of the laws of nature and the conservation laws. the two kinds of symmetries, namely the continuous and the discrete ones, are discussed. the physical background of these symmetries is illustrated. finally, we sketch some topical conservation problems in elementary particle physics.
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  13.  89
    Asher Peres (1980). The Physicist's Role in Physical Laws. Foundations of Physics 10 (7-8):631-634.
    The physicist not only observes phenomena, but he also has an active role in the formulation of some laws. For instance, laws involving irreversibility refer explicitly to what can or cannot be done by physicists. As the abilities of the latter may vary, we obtain sequences of laws, the convergence of which is discussed.
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  14.  84
    R. Eugene Collins (2005). The Mathematical Basis for Physical Laws. Foundations of Physics 35 (5):743-785.
    Laws of mechanics, quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, gravitation and relativity are derived as “related mathematical identities” based solely on the existence of a joint probability distribution for the position and velocity of a particle moving on a Riemannian manifold. This probability formalism is necessary because continuous variables are not precisely observable. These demonstrations explain why these laws must have the forms previously discovered through experiment and empirical deduction. Indeed, the very existence of electric, magnetic and gravitational fields is predicted (...)
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  15.  31
    Janet Broughton (1987). Necessity and Physical Laws in Descartes's Philosophy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3/4):205.
    I argue that although in his earlier work descartes thought of the laws of motion as "eternal truths," he later came to think of them as truths whose necessity is of a different type.
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  16.  49
    George Johnson, Physical Laws Collide in a Black Hole Bet.
    o an outsider, nothing might seem more ridiculous than the spectacle of grown men and women sitting around a conference table soberly discussing what would happen if a volume of the Encyclopedia Britannica were dropped down a black hole. Yet this very question lies at the heart of the "information paradox," a seeming contradiction to the laws of physics that is causing scientists to re-examine some of their most basic assumptions about how the universe is made.
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  17.  23
    John D. Norton (2000). What Can We Learn About Physical Laws From the Fact That We Have Memories Only of the Past? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (1):11 – 23.
    Not much. I demonstrate this by constructing a model of a memory system governed by deterministic, time reversible laws only, thereby showing that the mere fact of our having memories solely of the past does not necessitate an indeterministic, time asymmetric or stochastic physics, essentially thermodynamic processes or a primitive notion of time asymmetric causation.
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  18.  46
    Scott Edgar (2015). Intersubjectivity and Physical Laws in Post-Kantian Theory of Knowledge Natorp and Cassirer. In Sebastian Luft & J. Tyler Friedman (eds.), The Philosophy of Ernst Cassirer: A Novel Assessment. De Gruyter 141-162.
  19. Arthur Fine (1964). Physical Geometry and Physical Laws. Philosophy of Science 31 (2):156-162.
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  20.  17
    Jeff Yoshimi (2010). Husserl on Psycho-Physical Laws. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):25-42.
  21. L. L. Whyte (1957). On the Relation of Physical Laws to the Processes of Organisms. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 7 (28):347-350.
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  22.  40
    Hilary Lawton (1935). The Foundations of Physical Laws. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):453-467.
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  23. M. Scriven (1961). The Key Property of Physical Laws: Inaccuracy. In H. Feigl & G. Maxwell (eds.), Current Issues in the Philosophy of Science. New York 91Ð101.
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  24.  2
    Pat Langley (1981). Data‐Driven Discovery of Physical Laws. Cognitive Science 5 (1):31-54.
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  25.  16
    James A. McWilliams (1935). Contingency in Physical Laws. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 11:37-61.
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  26. John T. Roberts (2005). Measurability And Physical Laws. Synthese 144 (3):433-447.
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  27.  10
    G. Galeczki (1994). Physical Laws and the Theory of Special Relativity. Apeiron 20:27.
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  28.  9
    Veit Pittioni (1988). Kant's Theory of Physical Laws. Philosophy and History 21 (2):160-160.
  29.  22
    Michael Ruse (1988). Rigorous Regularism: Physical Laws Without Necessity. [REVIEW] Dialogue 27 (3):523.
  30.  9
    Ludvig Lövestad (1945). The Structure of Physical Laws. Theoria 11 (1):40-70.
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  31.  8
    Francesco Lacquaniti & Mirka Zago (2001). Internalization of Physical Laws as Revealed by the Study of Action Instead of Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):684-685.
    We review studies on catching that reveal internalization of physics for action control. In catching free-falling balls, an internal model of gravity is used by the brain to time anticipatory muscle activation, modulation of reflex responses, and tuning of limb impedance. An internal model of the expected momentum of the ball at impact is used to scale the amplitude of anticipatory muscle activity. [Barlow; Hecht; Shepard].
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  32.  1
    Franklin Boyle (1990). Algorithms and Physical Laws. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):656-657.
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  33.  1
    G. H. von Wright (1948). Review: Ludvig Lovestad, The Structure of Physical Laws. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 13 (3):157-157.
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  34. Ilya Prigogine (1971). Unity of Physical Laws and Levels of Description. In Marjorie Glicksman Grene & I. Prigogine (eds.), Interpretations of Life and Mind. New York,Humanities Press
     
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  35. Erik Weber & Merel Lefevere (2014). The Role of Unification in Micro-Explanations of Physical Laws. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 29 (1):41.
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  36. Joel Press (2009). Physical Explanations and Biological Explanations, Empirical Laws and a Priori Laws. Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):359-374.
    Philosophers intent upon characterizing the difference between physics and biology often seize upon the purported fact that physical explanations conform more closely to the covering law model than biological explanations. Central to this purported difference is the role of laws of nature in the explanations of these two sciences. However, I argue that, although certain important differences between physics and biology can be highlighted by differences between physical and biological explanations, these differences are not differences in the (...)
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  37.  30
    Susan G. Sterrett (2002). Physical Models and Fundamental Laws: Using One Piece of the World to Tell About Another. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 3 (1):51-66.
    In this paper I discuss the relationship between model, theories, and laws in the practice of experimental scale modeling. The methodology of experimental scale modeling, also known as physical similarity, differs markedly from that of other kinds of models in ways that are important to issues in philosophy of science. Scale models are not discussed in much depth in mainstream philosophy of science. In this paper, I examine how scale models are used in making inferences. The main question (...)
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  38.  26
    J. Brian Pitts, Einstein's Physical Strategy, Energy Conservation, Symmetries, and Stability: "But Grossmann & I Believed That the Conservation Laws Were Not Satisfied".
    Recent work on the history of General Relativity by Renn, Sauer, Janssen et al. shows that Einstein found his field equations partly by a physical strategy including the Newtonian limit, the electromagnetic analogy, and energy conservation. Such themes are similar to those later used by particle physicists. How do Einstein's physical strategy and the particle physics derivations compare? What energy-momentum complex did he use and why? Did Einstein tie conservation to symmetries, and if so, to which? How did (...)
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  39. Peter Mittelstaedt (forthcoming). Explanation of Physical Phenomena by Laws of Nature. Epistemologia.
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  40. John F. Halpin (1994). Legitimizing Chance: The Best-System Approach to Probabilistic Laws in Physical Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (3):317 – 338.
  41. D. Goldstick (1993). Laws of Nature and Physical Existents. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 7 (3):255 – 265.
    Abstract Nominalists, denying the reality of anything over and above concreta, are committed to a reductive account of any law of nature, explaining its necessity?the fact that it not only holds for all actual instances, but would hold for any additional ones?in, for example, epistemic terms (its likelihood/certainty of holding beyond the already observed instances). Nominalists argue that the world would be no different without irreducible modalities. ?Modal realists? often object that this parallels a common phenomenalist argument against believing in (...)
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  42. Paul Henri Thiry Holbach, Denis Diderot & H. D. Robinson (1970). The System of Nature or, Laws of the Moral and Physical World. B. Franklin.
     
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  43.  26
    C. F. Presley (1954). Laws and Theories in the Physical Sciences. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):79 – 103.
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  44. George John Romanes (1984). Christian Prayer and General Laws Being the Burney Prize Essay for the Year 1873, with an Appendix on the Physical Efficacy of Prayer.
     
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  45. Marc Lange (2009). Laws and Lawmakers: Science, Metaphysics, and the Laws of Nature. Oxford University Press.
    Laws form counterfactually stable sets -- Natural necessity -- Three payoffs of my account -- A world of subjunctives.
     
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  46.  23
    H. H. Pattee (2013). Epistemic, Evolutionary, and Physical Conditions for Biological Information. Biosemiotics 6 (1):9-31.
    The necessary but not sufficient conditions for biological informational concepts like signs, symbols, memories, instructions, and messages are (1) an object or referent that the information is about, (2) a physical embodiment or vehicle that stands for what the information is about (the object), and (3) an interpreter or agent that separates the referent information from the vehicle’s material structure, and that establishes the stands-for relation. This separation is named the epistemic cut, and explaining clearly how the stands-for relation (...)
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  47. Aldo Filomeno (2014). On the Possibility of Stable Regularities Without Fundamental Laws. Dissertation, Autonomous University of Barcelona
    This doctoral dissertation investigates the notion of physical necessity. Specifically, it studies whether it is possible to account for non-accidental regularities without the standard assumption of a pre-existent set of governing laws. Thus, it takes side with the so called deflationist accounts of laws of nature, like the humean or the antirealist. The specific aim is to complement such accounts by providing a missing explanation of the appearance of physical necessity. In order to provide an explanation, (...)
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  48. Michael Tooley (2009). Causes, Laws, and Ontology. In Helen Beebee, Peter Menzies & Christopher Hitchcock (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press 368--86.
    Different approaches to causation often diverge very significantly on ontological issues, in the case of both causal laws, and causal relations between states of affairs. This article sets out the main alternatives with regard to each. Causal concepts have surely been present from the time that language began, since the vast majority of action verbs involve the idea of causally affecting something. Thus, in the case of transitive verbs describing physical actions, there is the (...)
     
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  49.  5
    Dana Jalobeanu & Peter R. Anstey (eds.) (2011). Vanishing Matter and the Laws of Motion: Descartes and Beyond. Routledge.
    This volume explores the themes of vanishing matter, matter and the laws of nature, the qualities of matter, and the diversity of the debates about matter in the early modern period.
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  50. Victor J. Stenger (2006). The Comprehensible Cosmos: Where Do the Laws of Physics Come From? Prometheus Books.
    What are the laws of physics? -- The stuff that kicks back -- Point-of-view invariance -- Gauging the laws of physics -- Forces and broken symmetries -- Playing dice -- After the bang -- Out of the void -- The comprehensible cosmos -- Models of reality.
     
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