Search results for 'Physical research. [from old catalog' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christopher Clive Langton Gregory (1954). Physical and Physical Research. Reigate, Surrey, Omega Press.score: 195.6
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  2. James Grier[from old catalog] Miller (1974). A General Theory for the Behavioral Sciences. New York,J. Norton Publishers.score: 128.4
     
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  3. swami[from old catalog] Sivananda (1944). Yogic Home Exercises, Easy Course of Physical Culture for Modern Men and Women. Bombay, D. B. Taraporevala Sons & Co..score: 95.4
     
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  4. Patrick L. Taylor (2010). Overseeing Innovative Therapy Without Mistaking It for Research: A Function-Based Model Based on Old Truths, New Capacities, and Lessons From Stem Cells. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):286-302.score: 93.0
    Should innovative therapy occur only within a research paradigm and under institutional review board oversight? The health risks from current human embryonic stem cell clinical applications have raised again a fundamental question addressed first in papers submitted to inform the writing of the Belmont Report. Revisiting the thinking underlying the Belmont Report, together with examining changed circumstances since then, leads to a new model for overseeing innovative therapy based on its unique risks and context, important changes since the Belmont Report, (...)
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  5. Stephanie Denison & Fei Xu (2010). Integrating Physical Constraints in Statistical Inference by 11-Month-Old Infants. Cognitive Science 34 (5):885-908.score: 90.0
    Much research on cognitive development focuses either on early-emerging domain-specific knowledge or domain-general learning mechanisms. However, little research examines how these sources of knowledge interact. Previous research suggests that young infants can make inferences from samples to populations (Xu & Garcia, 2008) and 11- to 12.5-month-old infants can integrate psychological and physical knowledge in probabilistic reasoning (Teglas, Girotto, Gonzalez, & Bonatti, 2007; Xu & Denison, 2009). Here, we ask whether infants can integrate a physical constraint of immobility into (...)
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  6. Leopold Halpern (1987). Erwin Schrödinger's Views on Gravitational Physics During His Last Years at the University of Vienna and Some Research Ensuing From It. Foundations of Physics 17 (11):1113-1130.score: 79.0
    The author, who was Schrödinger's assistant during his last years in Vienna, gives an account of Schrödinger's views and activities during that time which lead him to a different approach to research on the relations between gravitation and quantum phenomena. Various features of past research are outlined in nontechnical terms. A heuristic argument is presented for the role of the zero-point energy of massive particles in counteracting gravitational collapse and the formation of horizons. Arguments are presented for the view that (...)
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  7. Maggie Nelson & Evan Lavender-Smith (2011). The Fragment as a Unit of Prose Composition. Continent 1 (3):158-170.score: 76.2
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 158-170. The Fragment as a Unit of Prose Composition: An Introduction —Ben Segal The fragment, the note, the idea, the aphorism even: there are many names and as many uses for such small shards of free-floating text. Typically fragments are less works than gestures, arrows pointing in the direction a person might research, meditate on or develop. Unlike paragraphs or sentences, they do not flow directly from and into their bordering text. Instead they are independent, defined by (...)
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  8. Michelle H. Biros (2007). Research Without Consent: Exception From and Waiver of Informed Consent in Resuscitation Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):361-369.score: 72.0
    The ethical concept of Informed Consent provides individuals with the right and the opportunity to approve of events that will occur regarding his or her own person. In medicine, informed consent is obtained for treatment and for research participation. However, under some circumstances, prospective informed consent cannot be obtained because of the devastating clinical condition of the patient. In emergency circumstances, treatment is never withheld if obtaining informed consent from a critically ill person is not possible or if a delay (...)
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  9. James J. Dooley & Helen M. Kerch (2000). Evolving Research Misconduct Policies and Their Significance for Physical Scientists. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (1):109-121.score: 69.0
    Scientific misconduct includes the fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism (FFP) of concepts, data or ideas; some institutions in the United States have expanded this concept to include “other serious deviations (OSD) from accepted research practice.” It is the absence of this OSD clause that distinguishes scientific misconduct policies of the past from the “research misconduct” policies that should be the basis of future federal policy in this area. This paper introduces a standard for judging whether an action should be considered research (...)
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  10. Caroline Gikonyo, Dorcas Kamuya, Bibi Mbete, Patricia Njuguna, Ally Olotu, Philip Bejon, Vicki Marsh & Sassy Molyneux (2013). Feedback of Research Findings for Vaccine Trials: Experiences From Two Malaria Vaccine Trials Involving Healthy Children on the Kenyan Coast. Developing World Bioethics 13 (1):48-56.score: 69.0
    Internationally, calls for feedback of findings to be made an ‘ethical imperative’ or mandatory have been met with both strong support and opposition. Challenges include differences in issues by type of study and context, disentangling between aggregate and individual study results, and inadequate empirical evidence on which to draw. In this paper we present data from observations and interviews with key stakeholders involved in feeding back aggregate study findings for two Phase II malaria vaccine trials among children under the age (...)
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  11. C. D. Broad (1953). Religion, Philosophy, and Physical Research. London, Routledge & K. Paul.score: 66.6
    the importance of this story in relation to the evidence for the ostensibly supernormal physical phenomena of Spiritualism. From 1869 onwards Sidgwick began to be associated with Myers in a common interest in psychical research. In the very ...
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  12. Edward Joseph Westenberger (1927). A Study of the Influence of Physical Defects Upon Intelligence and Achievement. Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America.score: 66.6
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  13. Michel Paty (2012). On the Structure of Rationality in the Thought and Invention or Creation of Physical Theories. Principia 15 (2):303.score: 63.0
    We want to consider anew the question, which is recurrent along the history of philosophy, of the relationship between rationality and mathematics, by inquiring to which extent the structuration of rationality, which ensures the unity of its function under a variety of forms (and even according to an evolution of these forms), could be considered as homeomorphic with that of mathematical thought, taken in its movement and made concrete in its theories. This idea, which is as old as philosophy itself, (...)
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  14. Robert A. Mechikoff (2006). A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 58.8
    This engaging and informative text will hold the attention of students and scholars as they take a journey through time to understand the role that history and philosophy have played in shaping the course of sport and physical education in Western and selected non-Western civilizations. Using appropriate theoretical and interpretive frameworks, students will investigate topics such as the historical relationship between mind and body; what philosophers and intellectuals have said about the body as a source of knowledge; educational philosophy (...)
     
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  15. Thomas Wolfgang Thurner & Liliana Proskuryakova (2013). Collaborative Research in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Evidence From 5 Years of US-Russian Research Cooperation. Journal of Research Practice 9 (1):Article M4.score: 57.0
    We reviewed the output of research and innovation cooperation between Russia and the US, including publications and patents, in the four prospective areas of energy efficiency and renewable energy during 2007-2011. Joint US-Russia research groups appear to focus primarily on hydrogen energy (fuel cells), followed by solar photovoltaics. The upcoming areas of smart grid and biofuels were left out entirely both from research and innovation collaboration. Russian patents in green energy technologies registered in the US are very low in comparison (...)
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  16. J. Cameron & A. Hart (2007). Ethical Issues in Obtaining Informed Consent for Research From Those Recovering From Acute Mental Health Problems: A Commentary. Research Ethics 3 (4):127-129.score: 54.6
    OBJECTIVE: Questions have been posed about the competence of persons with serious mental illness to consent to participate in clinical research. This study compared competence-related abilities of hospitalized persons with schizophrenia with those of a comparison sample of persons from the community who had never had a psychiatric hospitalization. METHODS: The study participants were administered the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR), a structured instrument designed to aid in the assessment of competence to consent to clinical research. The (...)
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  17. Elizabeth Harman (2007). How is the Ethics of Stem Cell Research Different From the Ethics of Abortion? Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):207–225.score: 54.0
    It seems that if abortion is permissible, then stem cell research must be as well: it involves the death of a less significant thing (an embryo rather than a fetus) for a greater good (lives saved rather than nine months of physical imposition avoided). However, I argue in this essay that this natural thought is mistaken. In particular, on the assumption that embryos and fetuses have the full moral status of persons, abortion is permissible but one form of stem (...)
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  18. David Kirk (2001). Schooling Bodies Through Physical Education: Insights From Social Epistemology and Curriculum History. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6):475-487.score: 54.0
    Using mainly historical material fromAustralia, the paper seeks to understand earlyforms of school physical training, sport andmedical inspection as specialised means ofschooling bodies. The study adopts a socialepistemological perspective in seeking tounderstand the meaning-in-use of notions suchas physical training. It explores the socialconsequences of the practices carried out inthe name of physical training, particularly inrelation to shifts in the social regulation ofbodies over time from a mass, externalised, andcentralised form to a relatively moreindividualised, internalised and diffuse form.This (...)
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  19. Benjamin Sachs (2011). Going From Principles to Rules in Research Ethics. Bioethics 25 (1):9-20.score: 54.0
    In research ethics there is a canon regarding what ethical rules ought to be followed by investigators vis-à-vis their treatment of subjects and a canon regarding what fundamental ethical principles apply to the endeavor. What I aim to demonstrate here is that several of the rules find no support in the principles. This leaves anyone who would insist that we not abandon those rules in the difficult position of needing to establish that we are nevertheless justified in believing in the (...)
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  20. Dominique Rivière (2011). Looking From the Outside/In: Re-Thinking Research Ethics Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (3):193-204.score: 54.0
    This paper shares my reflections on the research ethics review process, from the point of view of both a qualitative researcher and a member of an institutional research ethics review board. By considering research ethics review, first as practice, then as policy, as a relationship and, finally, as a performance, I attempt to outline a new vision of research ethics, one that engages seriously with the relationship between receiving ethics approval, and conducting ethical research.
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  21. Mark S. Davis, Michelle Riske-Morris & Sebastian R. Diaz (2008). Causal Factors Implicated in Research Misconduct: Evidence From Ori Case Files. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (2):395-414.score: 54.0
    There has been relatively little empirical research into the causes of research misconduct. To begin to address this void, the authors collected data from closed case files of the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). These data were in the form of statements extracted from ORI file documents including transcripts, investigative reports, witness statements, and correspondence. Researchers assigned these statements to 44 different concepts. These concepts were then analyzed using multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. The authors chose a solution consisting of (...)
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  22. Vincent Richman & Alex Richman (2012). A Tale of Two Perspectives: Regulation Versus Self-Regulation. A Financial Reporting Approach (From Sarbanes–Oxley) for Research Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):241-246.score: 54.0
    Reports of research fraud have raised concerns about research integrity similar to concerns raised about financial accounting fraud. We propose a departure from self-regulation in that researchers adopt the financial accounting approach in establishing trust through an external validation process, in addition to the reporting entities and the regulatory agencies. The general conceptual framework for reviewing financial reports, utilizes external auditors who are certified and objective in using established standards to provide an opinion on the financial reports. These standards have (...)
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  23. Eric Chwang (2008). Against the Inalienable Right to Withdraw From Research. Bioethics 22 (7):370-378.score: 54.0
    In this paper I argue, against the current consensus, that the right to withdraw from research is sometimes alienable. In other words, research subjects are sometimes morally permitted to waive their right to withdraw. The argument proceeds in three major steps. In the first step, I argue that rights typically should be presumed alienable, both because that is not illegitimately coercive and because the general paternalistic motivation for keeping them inalienable is untenable. In the second step of the argument, I (...)
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  24. Søren Holm (2011). Withdrawing From Research: A Rethink in the Context of Research Biobanks. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (3):269-281.score: 54.0
    It is generally assumed in research ethics that research participants have an unconditional right to withdraw from research without any detriment or reprisal. This paper analyses this right in the context of biobank research and argues that the traditional shape of the right in clinical research can be modified in biobank research without incurring significant ethical cost. The paper falls in three parts. The first part is a brief explication of the philosophical justification of the right to withdraw. The second (...)
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  25. Simon Woods & Pauline Mccormack (2013). Disputing the Ethics of Research: The Challenge From Bioethics and Patient Activism to the Interpretation of the Declaration of Helsinki in Clinical Trials. Bioethics 27 (5):243-250.score: 54.0
    In this paper we argue that the consensus around normative standards for the ethics of research in clinical trials, strongly influenced by the Declaration of Helsinki, is perceived from various quarters as too conservative and potentially restrictive of research that is seen as urgent and necessary. We examine this problem from the perspective of various challengers who argue for alternative approaches to what ought or ought not to be permitted. Key themes within this analysis will examine these claims and argue (...)
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  26. Sassy Molyneux, Stephen Mulupi, Lairumbi Mbaabu & Vicki Marsh (2012). Benefits and Payments for Research Participants: Experiences and Views From a Research Centre on the Kenyan Coast. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):13-.score: 54.0
    BackgroundThere is general consensus internationally that unfair distribution of the benefits of research is exploitative and should be avoided or reduced. However, what constitutes fair benefits, and the exact nature of the benefits and their mode of provision can be strongly contested. Empirical studies have the potential to contribute viewpoints and experiences to debates and guidelines, but few have been conducted. We conducted a study to support the development of guidelines on benefits and payments for studies conducted by the KEMRI-Wellcome (...)
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  27. Judge Christian Byk (2002). Conflicts of Interests and Access to Information Resulting From Biomedical Research: An International Legal Perspective. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):287-290.score: 54.0
    Recently adopted international texts have given a new focus on conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research. They confirmed ethical review committees as a central point to guarantee individual rights and the effective application of ethical principles. Therefore specific attention should be paid in giving such committees all the facilities necessary to keep them independent and qualified.
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  28. Morenike O. Folayan, Kolawole S. Oyedeji & Olawunmi A. Fatusi (2013). Community Members' Engagement with and Involvement in Genomic Research: Lessons to Learn From the Field. Developing World Bioethics 14 (1).score: 54.0
    In this paper, we describe the potential role laypersons on ethics committees can play in ensuring community concerns are addressed in the design and implementation of genomic research. We draw inferences from the outcome of an empirical study of the impact of training of laypersons to address community engagement issues in ethics review of research protocol. While this paper does not advocate a particular solution, it describes the importance of community engagement in genomic research, the current limitations there are in (...)
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  29. David B. Resnick (1999). Privatized Biomedical Research, Public Fears, and the Hazards of Government Regulation: Lessons From Stem Cell Research. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (3):273-287.score: 54.0
    This paper discusses the hazards of regulating controversial biomedical research in light of the emergence of powerful, multi-national biotechnology corporations. Prohibitions on the use of government funds can simply force controversial research into the private sphere, and unilateral or multilateral research bans can simply encourage multi-national companies to conduct research in countries that lack restrictive laws. Thus, a net effect of government regulation is that research migrates from the public to the private sphere. Because private research receives less oversight and (...)
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  30. Adnan A. Hyder, Waleed Zafar, Joseph Ali, Robert Ssekubugu, Paul Ndebele & Nancy Kass (2013). Evaluating Institutional Capacity for Research Ethics in Africa: A Case Study From Botswana. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):31.score: 54.0
    The increase in the volume of research conducted in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC), has brought a renewed international focus on processes for ethical conduct of research. Several programs have been initiated to strengthen the capacity for research ethics in LMIC. However, most such programs focus on individual training or development of ethics review committees. The objective of this paper is to present an approach to institutional capacity assessment in research ethics and application of this approach in the form (...)
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  31. Alison Jaggar & Scott Wisor (2013). Feminist Methodology in Practice: Lessons From a Research Program. In , Just Methods: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Paradigm.score: 54.0
    This article reflects critically on the methodology of one feminist research project which is ongoing as we write. The project is titled “Assessing Development: Designing Better Indices of Poverty and Gender Equity” and its aim is to develop a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The authors of this article are among several philosophers on the research team, which also includes scholars from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology and economics. This article begin by explaining why a (...)
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  32. Douglas J. Hacker Linda Bol (2012). Calibration Research: Where Do We Go From Here? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Research on calibration remains a popular line of inquiry. Calibration is the degree of fit between a person’s judgment of performance and his or her actual performance. Given the continued interest in this topic, the questions posed in this article are fruitful directions to pursue to help address gaps in calibration research. In this article, we have identified six research directions that if productively pursued, could greatly expand our knowledge of calibration. The six research directions are: (a) what are the (...)
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  33. R. Nakkash, J. Makhoul & R. Afifi (2009). Obtaining Informed Consent: Observations From Community Research with Refugee and Impoverished Youth. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):638-643.score: 54.0
    This paper presents challenges facing researchers in applying basic ethical principles while conducting research with youth in a developing country context. A discussion of the cultural and social challenges to adherence to the elements of informed consent: disclosure, comprehension, capacity, voluntariness and consent is presented. The authors argue that the current institutional review board requirements that guide research reflect values and stem from western contexts that may not be fully applicable to non-western contexts. More dialogue is needed among researchers in (...)
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  34. E. Suzanne Nederlof & Constant Dangbégnon (2007). Lessons for Farmer-Oriented Research: Experiences From a West African Soil Fertility Management Project. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 24 (3):369-387.score: 54.0
    Donors, scientists and farmers all benefit when research and development projects have high impact. However, potential benefits are sometimes not realized. Our objective in this study is to determine why resource-poor farmers in Togo (declined to) adopt recommended practices that were promoted through a multi-organizational project on soil fertility management. We examine the processes and outcomes related to the adoption process. The project was undertaken in three villages in the Central Region of Togo in West Africa. The development and research (...)
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  35. Pascal C. Sanginga, Jackson Tumwine & Nina K. Lilja (2006). Patterns of Participation in Farmers' Research Groups: Lessons From the Highlands of Southwestern Uganda. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):501-512.score: 54.0
    There is increasing interest in farmers’ organizations as an effective approach to farmer participatory research (FPR). Using data from an empirical study of farmers’ research groups (FRGs) in Uganda, this paper examines the patterns of participation in groups and answers questions such as: Who participates? What types of participation? How does participation occur? What are the factors determining participation? Results show that there is no single type of participation, but rather that FPR is a dynamic process with types of participation (...)
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  36. Michael J. White (1992). The Continuous and the Discrete: Ancient Physical Theories From a Contemporary Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 51.6
    This book presents a detailed analysis of three ancient models of spatial magnitude, time, and local motion. The Aristotelian model is presented as an application of the ancient, geometrically orthodox conception of extension to the physical world. The other two models, which represent departures from mathematical orthodoxy, are a "quantum" model of spatial magnitude, and a Stoic model, according to which limit entities such as points, edges, and surfaces do not exist in (physical) reality. The book is unique (...)
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  37. Olga Zvonareva, Nora Engel, Eleanor Ross, Ron Berghmans, Ames Dhai & Anja Krumeich (2013). Engaging Diverse Social and Cultural Worlds: Perspectives on Benefits in International Clinical Research From South African Communities. Developing World Bioethics 14 (1).score: 51.6
    The issue of benefits in international clinical research is highly controversial. Against the background of wide recognition of the need to share benefits of research, the nature of benefits remains strongly contested. Little is known about the perspectives of research populations on this issue and the extent to which research ethics discourses and guidelines are salient to the expectations and aspirations existing on the ground. This exploratory study contributes to filling this void by examining perspectives of people in low-income South (...)
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  38. Malika Roman Isler & Giselle Corbie-Smith (2012). Practical Steps to Community Engaged Research: From Inputs to Outcomes. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):904-914.score: 51.6
    For decades, the dominant research paradigm has included trials conducted in clinical settings with little involvement from communities. The move toward community engaged research (CEnR) necessitates the inclusion of diverse perspectives to address complex problems. Using a relationship paradigm, CEnR reframes the context, considerations, practical steps, and outcomes of research.
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  39. Horst Krist (2001). The Internalization of Physical Constraints From a Developmental Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):681-682.score: 51.6
    Shepard's internalization concept is defended against Hecht's criticisms. By ignoring both Shepard's evolutionary perspective and the fact that internalization does not preclude modularization, Hecht advances inconclusive evidence. Developmental research supports Shepard's conclusion that kinematic geometry may be more deeply internalized than physical dynamics. This research also suggests that the internalization concept should be broadened to include representations acquired during ontogeny. [Hecht; Shepard].
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  40. Katherine A. Tredwell & Peter Barker (2007). Copernicus' First Friends: Physical Copernicanism From 1543 to 1610. Filozofski Vestnik 2.score: 51.6
    Between the appearance of Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus in 1543 and the works of Kepler and Galileo that appeared in 1609–10, there were probably no more than a dozen converts to physical heliocentrism. Following Westman we take this list to include Rheticus, Maestlin, Rothmann, Kepler, Bruno, Galileo, Digges, Harriot, de Zúńiga, and Stevin, but we include Gemma Frisius and William Gilbert, and omit Thomas Harriot. In this paper we discuss the reasons this tiny group of true Copernicans give for believing (...)
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  41. A. Grinyer (2001). Ethical Dilemmas in Nonclinical Health Research From a UK Perspectives. Nursing Ethics 8 (2):123-132.score: 51.6
    This article examines the ethical dilemmas faced by professional and academic researchers in the health field who undertake nonclinical or social research among patients or staff. The experiences of health researchers and health professionals in the UK are directly relevant to those undertaking similar health-related research in other parts of the world at a time when nonclinical research in health care is becoming widespread in all countries and cultures. This article addresses ethical dilemmas as they relate to researchers’ ability to (...)
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  42. Susan Slaughter, Dixie Cole, Eileen Jennings & Marlene A. Reimer (2007). Consent and Assent to Participate in Research From People with Dementia. Nursing Ethics 14 (1):27-40.score: 51.6
    Conducting research with vulnerable populations involves careful attention to the interests of individuals. Although it is generally understood that informed consent is a necessary prerequisite to research participation, it is less clear how to proceed when potential research participants lack the capacity to provide this informed consent. The rationale for assessing the assent or dissent of vulnerable individuals and obtaining informed consent by authorized representatives is discussed. Practical guidelines for recruitment of and data collection from people in the middle or (...)
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  43. Stefan Timmermans & Iddo Tavory (2012). Theory Construction in Qualitative Research: From Grounded Theory to Abductive Analysis. Sociological Theory 30 (3):167 - 186.score: 51.6
    A critical pathway for conceptual innovation in the social is the construction of theoretical ideas based on empirical data. Grounded theory has become a leading approach promising the construction of novel theories. Yet grounded theory-based theoretical innovation has been scarce in part because of its commitment to let theories emerge inductively rather than imposing analytic frameworks a priori. We note, along with a long philosophical tradition, that induction does not logically lead to novel theoretical insights. Drawing from the theory of (...)
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  44. Hans-Peter Graf (2011). Protecting Research Subjects From Prohibited Multi-Participation in Clinical Trials. Research Ethics 7 (4):136-147.score: 51.0
    The protection of human research subjects in clinical studies is regulated by international guidelines and national laws. Research Ethics Committees play an important role here, as they review the documentation for clinical studies under consideration of ethical aspects. This documentation includes an exclusion or wash-out period which designates when study subjects may not have participated in another study or be allowed to take part in a future one within a specified time period. However not all research subjects comply with their (...)
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  45. Phil Jones (2007). Constructing Meaning From Letterforms: Reflections on the Development of a Practice-Based Research Proposal. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M9.score: 51.0
    Research paradigms are only starting to emerge in relation to art and design practice. Consequently, research design in this domain often employs perspectives and methods developed in other disciplines. This paper traces the development of a proposal that combines theories from cognitive linguistics with graphic design practice. It describes the resulting challenges to and transformations of my long-held assumptions and understanding about graphic design and the communication process. It also outlines the way in which semantic analysis (a method from cognitive (...)
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  46. Dawn E. Pollon, Monique Herbert, Saad Chahine & Olesya Falenchuk (2013). From Research Assistant to Professional Research Assistance: Research Consulting as a Form of Research Practice. Journal of Research Practice 9 (2):Article M6.score: 51.0
    Research assistantships have long been viewed as an extension of the formal education process, a form of apprenticeship, and a pathway into the professional practice of research in institutional settings. However, there are other contexts in which researchers practice research. Our self-reflective analysis identified that RAship experiences during the masters and the PhD may serve developmentally foundational roles in the advancement of an RA’s knowledge, skills, and passion for research. Further, analysis of participants’ experiences revealed that RA supervisors play critical (...)
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  47. William Rumsey & Chris Lang (2000). Science for Primary School: The Physics Knowledge. Kyle Forinash is a Professor of Physics at Indiana University Southeast. He Ob-Tained His PhD in Physics From the University of Georgia. His Most Recent Research has Been in Non-Linear Dynamics of Discrete Systems. [REVIEW] Science and Education 9:487-488.score: 51.0
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  48. Jeremy Snyder, Valorie Crooks & Leigh Turner (2011). Issues and Challenges in Research on the Ethics of Medical Tourism: Reflections From a Conference. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):3-6.score: 49.2
    The authors co-organized (Snyder and Crooks) and gave a keynote presentation at (Turner) a conference on ethical issues in medical tourism. Medical tourism involves travel across international borders with the intention of receiving medical care. This care is typically paid for out-of-pocket and is motivated by an interest in cost savings and/or avoiding wait times for care in the patient’s home country. This practice raises numerous ethical concerns, including potentially exacerbating health inequities in destination and source countries and disrupting continuity (...)
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  49. T. Brian Mooney & Damien Norris (2007). Merleau-Ponty on Human Motility and Libet's Paradox. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (1):1-9.score: 49.2
    In 1979, neuroscientists Libet, Wright, Feinstein and Pearl introduced the “delay-and-antedating” hypothesis/paradox based on the results of an on-going series of experiments dating back to 1964 that measured the neural adequacy [brain wave activity] of “conscious sensory experience”. What is fascinating about the results of this experiment is the implication, especially when considered in the light of Merleau-Ponty’s notions of “intentionality” and the “pre-reflective life of human motility”, that the body, and hence not solely the mind, is a thinking thing. (...)
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  50. Ágnes Simon (2012). Intellectual Migration and Economic Thought: Central European Émigré Economists and the History of Modern Economics. History of European Ideas 38 (3):467-482.score: 49.2
    Summary This article examines the life and thought of Thomas Balogh and Nicholas Kaldor, two Hungarian-born British economists, to suggest how the personal background and émigré status of these economists changed their view of the British economy and the economic policy recommendations they put forward as high-profile government advisers in the post-1945 period. This article combines research on inter-war intellectual migration and the history of British economics and economic policy making after the Second World War. It shows how the large (...)
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