Search results for 'Physical sciences Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Monika Asztalos, John Emery Murdoch, Ilkka Niiniluoto & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy (1990). Knowledge and the Sciences in Medieval Philosophy. Yliopistopaino.
     
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  2. Lee Hardy (2014). Nature’s Suit: Husserl’s Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences. Ohio University Press.
    Edmund Husserl, founder of the phenomenological movement, is usually read as an idealist in his metaphysics and an instrumentalist in his philosophy of science. In _Nature’s Suit_, Lee Hardy argues that both views represent a serious misreading of Husserl’s texts. Drawing upon the full range of Husserl’s major published works together with material from Husserl’s unpublished manuscripts, Hardy develops a consistent interpretation of Husserl’s conception of logic as a theory of science, his phenomenological account of truth and rationality, his (...)
     
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  3. Lee Hardy (2014). Nature's Suit: Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences. Ohio University Press.
    Edmund Husserl, founder of the phenomenological movement, is usually read as an idealist in his metaphysics and an instrumentalist in his philosophy of science. In _Nature’s Suit_, Lee Hardy argues that both views represent a serious misreading of Husserl’s texts. Drawing upon the full range of Husserl’s major published works together with material from Husserl’s unpublished manuscripts, Hardy develops a consistent interpretation of Husserl’s conception of logic as a theory of science, his phenomenological account of truth and rationality, his (...)
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  4. Justin Leiber (2002). Philosophy, Engineering, Biology, and History: A Vindication of Turing's Views About the Distinction Between the Cognitive and Physical Sciences. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 14 (1):29-37.
    Alan Turing draws a firm line between the mental and the physical, between the cognitive and physical sciences. For Turing, following a tradition that went back to D=Arcy Thompson, if not Geoffroy and Lucretius, throws talk of function, intentionality, and final causes from biology as a physical science. He likens Amother nature@ to the earnest A. I. scientist, who may send to school disparate versions of the Achild machine,@ eventually hoping for a test-passer but knowing that (...)
     
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  5.  11
    N. E. (1950). The Modern Approach to Descartes' Problem. The Relation of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences to Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):109-110.
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  6.  11
    Viii Part (2013). Philosophy of the Physical Sciences: Philosophy of Chemistry. In Vassilios Karakostas & Dennis Dieks (eds.), Epsa11 Perspectives and Foundational Problems in Philosophy of Science. Springer
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  7.  10
    Harald A. Wiltsche (2015). Lee Hardy, Nature’s Suit. Husserl’s Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences. Husserl Studies 31 (2):175-182.
    The debate about scientific realism has occupied center stage in philosophy of science since its very inception. The main question is whether or not scientific theories are true descriptions of the world. Or, to give the question a slightly different spin: What grounds do we have for believing in the reality of the unobservable entities postulated by contemporary science ? Although the main arena of this debate is analytic philosophy, it is clear that these questions are no less (...)
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  8. Thomas Kuhn (1980). The Halt and the Blind: Philosophy and History of Science : "Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences"). [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 31:181.
     
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  9.  3
    Peter Alexander (1964). Method in the Physical Sciences. By G. Schlesinger. International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method. (Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd, London, 1963. Pp. VIII × 140.21s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 39 (149):278.
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  10. G. Schlesinger (1964). Method in the Physical Sciences. International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method. Philosophy 39 (149):278-279.
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  11. Edmund Whittaker (1950). The Modern Approach to Descartes' Problem. The Relation of the Mathematical and Physical Sciences to Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy 47 (4):109-110.
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  12.  5
    M. Massimi (2008). " The Relevance of Kant's Philosophy for the Physical Sciences of Nineteenth Century". Review of M. Friedman and A. Nordmann (Eds.)" The Kantian Legacy in Nineteenth Century Science"(MIT Press). [REVIEW] Metascience 17:79-83.
  13. Lawrence Badash (1971). History and Philosophy of Science Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences. Vol. I. Ed. By Russell McCormmach. University of Pennsylvania Press & Oxford University Press. 1969 [1970]. Pp. X + 314. £4. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 5 (3):292.
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  14. Mario Bunge (1986). Treatise on Basic Philosophy, vol. 7 : Epistemology and Methodology, III : « Philosophy of Science and Technology », Part I : « Formal and Physical Sciences », Part II : « Life Science, Social Science and Technology ». Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (3):389-393.
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  15. R. G. A. Dolby (1970). Philosophy of Science Discovery in the Physical Sciences. By Richard J. Blackwell. Notre Dame and London: University of Notre Dame Press. Pp. Xii + 240. 1969. 81s. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 5 (2):187.
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  16. Alan M. Laibelman (1992). Perennial Philosophy: Evidence From the Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 15:216.
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  17. William J. O'meara (1936). Problems: Physical Sciences and Causality; Science and a Philosophy of Nature. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 12:117.
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  18. Eric P. Polten & John C. Eccles (1975). Critique of the Psycho-Physical Identity Theory : A refutation of scientific materialism and an establishment of mind-matter dualism by means of philosophy and scientific method, 1 vol. coll., « New Babylon : Studies in the Social Sciences ». Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 165 (1):83-83.
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  19.  1
    Richard J. Blackwell (1969). Discovery in the Physical Sciences. Notre Dame [Ind.]University of Notre Dame Press.
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  20.  7
    Donald Lawson Turcotte, John Rundle & Hans Frauenfelder (eds.) (2002). Self-Organized Complexity in the Physical, Biological, and Social Sciences. National Academy of Sciences.
    Self-organized complexity in the physical, biological, and social sciences Donald L Turcotte*f and John B. Rundle* *Department of Earth and Atmospheric ...
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  21. Edward W. Strong (1976). Procedures and Metaphysics: A Study in the Philosophy of Mathematical-Physical Science in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Richwood Pub. Co..
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  22.  24
    Colin Howson (ed.) (1976). Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Cambridge University Press.
    Lakatos, I. History of science and its rational reconstructions.--Clark, P. Atomism vs. thermodynamics.--Worrall, J. Thomas Young and the "rufutation" of Newtonian optics.--Musgrave, A. Why did oxygen supplant phlogiston?--Zahar, E. Why did Einstein's programme supersede Lorentz's?--Frické, M. The rejection of Avogadro's hypotheses.--Feyerabend, P. On the critique of scientific reason.
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  23. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life (...)
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  24.  35
    Dennis Dieks (2010). Physical and Philosophical Perspectives on Probability, Explanation and Time (Workshop of the ESF Programme "The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective", Utrecht University, 19–20 October 2009). [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):383 - 388.
  25.  1
    Jean Robillard (2006). PhilosoPhy of Communication: What Does It Have to Do with PhilosoPhy of Social Sciences. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (2):245-260.
    As concepts, communication and information are very closely related, but they also designate more than their usual conceptual meaning when they are called upon in social theories as well as in philosophical theories about the reality and the truth of social life; information and communication are then designating physical events or event like objects of the observable reality, which will be hereafter described as a procedural ontologization of information. Why do they have this role and how do they play (...)
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  26.  22
    Fritz Rohrlich (1990). Computer Simulation in the Physical Sciences. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:507-518.
    Computer simulation is shown to be philosophically interesting because it introduces a qualitatively new methodology for theory construction in science different from the conventional two components of "theory" and "experiment and/or observation". This component is "experimentation with theoretical models." Two examples from the physical sciences are presented for the purpose of demonstration but it is claimed that the biological and social sciences permit similar theoretical model experiments. Furthermore, computer simulation permits theoretical models for the evolution of (...) systems which use cellular automata rather than differential equations as their syntax. The great advantages of the former are indicated. (shrink)
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  27. Mark Kac (1972). Advances in the Physical and Life Sciences. Washington,American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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  28. Michela Massimi (ed.) (2014). Philosophy and the Sciences for Everyone. Routledge.
    What is the origin of our universe? What are dark matter and dark energy? What is our role in the universe as human beings capable of knowledge? What makes us intelligent cognitive agents seemingly endowed with consciousness? Scientific research across both the physical and cognitive sciences raises fascinating philosophical questions. Philosophy and the Sciences For Everyone introduces these questions and more. It begins by asking what good is philosophy for the sciences before examining the (...)
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  29.  43
    Cliff Hooker (1980). From Being to Becoming Time and Complexity in the Physical Sciences. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30.  9
    M. H. Krieger (1993). Book Reviews : Paul Humphreys, The Chances of Explanation: Causal Explanation in the Social, Medical, and Physical Sciences. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1989. Pp. X, 170, $29.50 (Cloth. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (2):252-253.
  31.  1
    J. J. C. Smart (1977). Book Reviews : Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Edited by Colin Howson. New York: Cam Bridge University Press, 1976. Pp. VII + 344. $24.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (4):425-426.
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  32. Martin H. Krieger (1993). "The Chances of Explanation: Causal Explanation in the Social, Medical, and Physical Sciences", by Paul Humphreys. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (2):252.
     
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  33. J. J. C. Smart (1977). Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences" Edited by Colin Howson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (4):425.
     
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  34.  66
    Wolfgang Stegmüller (1979). The Structuralist View of Theories: A Possible Analogue of the Bourbaki Programme in Physical Science. Springer-Verlag.
    This is the basis of the first part of the book.
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  35.  5
    Adam Abruzzi (1954). Problems of Inference in the Socio-Physical Sciences. Journal of Philosophy 51 (19):537-549.
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  36. Marshall Spector (1978). Concepts of Reduction in Physical Science. Temple University Press.
     
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  37. Fritz Rohrlich (1988). Pluralistic Ontology and Theory Reduction in the Physical Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):295-312.
    It is demonstrated that the reduction of a physical theory S to another one, T, in the sense that S can be derived from T holds in general only for the mathematical framework. The interpretation of S and the associated central terms cannot all be derived from those of T because of the qualitative differences between the cognitive levels of S and T. Their cognitively autonomous status leads to an epistemic as well as an ontological pluralism. This pluralism is (...)
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  38. Charles Taylor (1985). Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taylor has been one of the most original and influential figures in contemporary philosophy: his 'philosophical anthropology' spans an unusually wide range of theoretical interests and draws creatively on both Anglo-American and Continental traditions in philosophy. A selection of his published papers is presented here in two volumes, structured to indicate the direction and essential unity of the work. He starts from a polemical concern with behaviourism and other reductionist theories (particularly in psychology and the philosophy (...)
     
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  39.  7
    Ronald M. Yoshida (1977). Reduction in the Physical Sciences. Published for the Canadian Association for Publishing in Philosophy by Dalhousie University Press.
  40.  19
    Harry Collins (2007). Mathematical Understanding and the Physical Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):667-685.
    The author claims to have developed interactional expertise in gravitational wave physics without engaging with the mathematical or quantitative aspects of the subject. Is this possible? In other words, is it possible to understand the physical world at a high enough level to argue and make judgments about it without the corresponding mathematics? This question is empirically approached in three ways: anecdotes about non-mathematical physicists are presented; the author undertakes a reflective reading of a passage of physics, first without (...)
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  41.  2
    Louis Osgood Kattsoff (1957). Physical Science and Physical Reality. The Hague, Nijhoff.
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  42.  11
    Paul Humphreys & Jim Woodward (1993). The Chances of Explanation: Causal Explanation in the Social, Medical and Physical Sciences. Philosophy of Science 60 (4):659.
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  43.  3
    G. Schlesinger (1963). Method in the Physical Sciences. New York, Humanities Press.
    Originally published in 1963. Can one discern certain regularities in the manoeuvrings and techniques employed by scientists and can these be formulated into the methodological principles of science? What is the origin and basis of such principles? Are they imposed by objective realities, do they derive from conceptual necessities or are they rooted in our own deep seated predilections? This volume investigates these questions and sheds light on the growth mechanism of the evolving structure of science itself.
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  44.  48
    Brian Ellis (1957). A Comparison of Process and Non-Process Theories in the Physical Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (29):45-56.
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  45.  9
    K. Mainzer (1994). Symmetries in the Physical Sciences. In Dag Prawitz & Dag Westerståhl (eds.), Logic and Philosophy of Science in Uppsala. Kluwer 453--464.
  46.  28
    C. F. Presley (1954). Laws and Theories in the Physical Sciences. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 32 (2):79 – 103.
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  47.  8
    Michael Bradie (1973). Book Review:Scientific Method: The Hypothetico-Experimental Laboratory Procedure of the Physical Sciences James K. Feibleman. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 40 (3):467-.
  48.  3
    Frank E. Hartung (1948). On the Contribution of Sociology to the Physical Sciences. Philosophy of Science 15 (2):109-115.
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  49.  12
    Jim Woodward (1993). Book Review:The Chances of Explanation: Causal Explanation in the Social, Medical and Physical Sciences Paul Humphreys. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 60 (4):671-.
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  50.  5
    Cliff Hooker (1984). Book Review:From Being to Becoming: Time and Complexity in the Physical Sciences Ilya Prigogine. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 51 (2):355-.
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