Search results for 'Physical sciences Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Edward W. Strong (1976). Procedures and Metaphysics: A Study in the Philosophy of Mathematical-Physical Science in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Richwood Pub. Co..score: 339.0
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  2. Donald Lawson Turcotte, John Rundle & Hans Frauenfelder (eds.) (2002). Self-Organized Complexity in the Physical, Biological, and Social Sciences. National Academy of Sciences.score: 318.0
    Self-organized complexity in the physical, biological, and social sciences Donald L Turcotte*f and John B. Rundle* *Department of Earth and Atmospheric ...
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  3. Richard J. Blackwell (1969). Discovery in the Physical Sciences. Notre Dame [Ind.]University of Notre Dame Press.score: 306.0
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  4. Justin Leiber (2002). Philosophy, Engineering, Biology, and History: A Vindication of Turing's Views About the Distinction Between the Cognitive and Physical Sciences. Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 14 (1):29-37.score: 303.0
    Alan Turing draws a firm line between the mental and the physical, between the cognitive and physical sciences. For Turing, following a tradition that went back to D=Arcy Thompson, if not Geoffroy and Lucretius, throws talk of function, intentionality, and final causes from biology as a physical science. He likens Amother nature@ to the earnest A. I. scientist, who may send to school disparate versions of the Achild machine,@ eventually hoping for a test-passer but knowing that (...)
     
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  5. Viii Part (2013). Philosophy of the Physical Sciences: Philosophy of Chemistry. In Vassilios Karakostas & Dennis Dieks (eds.), Epsa11 Perspectives and Foundational Problems in Philosophy of Science. Springer.score: 288.0
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  6. Cliff Hooker (1979). Ronald M. Yoshida: “Reduction in The Physical Sciences.” (Philosophy in Canada, Vol. 4) Dalhousie: Dalhousie University Press, 1977. 90 Pages. [REVIEW] Dialogue 18 (01):81-99.score: 270.0
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  7. Peter Alexander (1964). Method in the Physical Sciences. By G. Schlesinger. International Library of Philosophy and Scientific Method. (Routledge and Kegan Paul Ltd, London, 1963. Pp. VIII × 140.21s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 39 (149):278-.score: 270.0
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  8. Lee Hardy (2014). Nature’s Suit: Husserl’s Phenomenological Philosophy of the Physical Sciences. Ohio University Press.score: 261.0
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  9. Alan M. Laibelman (1992). Perennial Philosophy: Evidence From the Mathematical and Physical Sciences. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 15:216.score: 261.0
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  10. M. Massimi (2008). " The Relevance of Kant's Philosophy for the Physical Sciences of Nineteenth Century". Review of M. Friedman and A. Nordmann (Eds.)" The Kantian Legacy in Nineteenth Century Science"(MIT Press). [REVIEW] Metascience 17:79-83.score: 261.0
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  11. Arthur Stanley Eddington (1958). The Philosophy of Physical Science. [Ann Arbor]University of Michigan Press.score: 246.0
    The lectures have afforded me an opportunity of developing more fully than in my earlier books the principles of philosophic thought associated with the modern advances of physical science. It is often said that there is no "philosophy of ...
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  12. Robert Inkpen (2005). Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography. Routledge.score: 245.3
    This accessible and engaging text explores the relationship between philosophy, science and physical geography. It addresses an imbalance that exists in opinion, teaching and to a lesser extent research, between a philosophically enriched human geography and a perceived philosophically ignorant physical geography. Science, Philosophy and Physical Geography , challenges the myth that there is a single self-evident scientific method, that can and is applied in a straightforward manner by physical geographers. It demonstrates the variety (...)
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  13. Wolfgang Stegmüller (1979). The Structuralist View of Theories: A Possible Analogue of the Bourbaki Programme in Physical Science. Springer-Verlag.score: 240.0
    This is the basis of the first part of the book.
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  14. Louis Osgood Kattsoff (1957). Physical Science and Physical Reality. The Hague, Nijhoff.score: 240.0
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  15. Marshall Spector (1978). Concepts of Reduction in Physical Science. Temple University Press.score: 240.0
     
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  16. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 232.0
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life (...)
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  17. Peter T. Manicas (2006). A Realist Philosophy of Social Science: Explanation and Understanding. Cambridge University Press.score: 225.0
    This introduction to the philosophy of social science provides an original conception of the task and nature of social inquiry. Peter Manicas discusses the role of causality seen in the physical sciences and offers a reassessment of the problem of explanation from a realist perspective. He argues that the fundamental goal of theory in both the natural and social sciences is not, contrary to widespread opinion, prediction and control, or the explanation of events (including behaviour). Instead, (...)
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  18. Oliver Leslie Reiser (1935). Philosophy and the Concepts of Modern Science. New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 217.0
    pt. I. Philosophy and the physical sciences.--pt. II. Philosophy and the social sciences.
     
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  19. David Charles & Kathleen Lennon (eds.) (1992). Reduction, Explanation, and Realism. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    The contributors to this volume examine the motivations for anti-reductionist views, and assess their coherence and success, in a number of different fields, including moral and mental philosophy, psychology, organic biology, and the social sciences.
     
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  20. Immanuel Kant (2004). Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 207.0
    Kant was centrally concerned with issues in the philosophy of natural science throughout his career. The Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science presents his most mature reflections on these themes in the context of both his 'critical' philosophy, presented in the Critique of Pure Reason, and the natural science of his time. This volume presents a new translation, by Michael Friedman, which is especially clear and accurate. There are explanatory notes indicating some of the main connections between the argument (...)
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  21. Lawrence Sklar (ed.) (2000). The Philosophy of Science: A Collection of Essays. Garland.score: 205.0
    About the Series Contemporary philosophy of science combines a general study from a philosophical perspective of the methods of science, with an inquiry, again from the philosophical point of view, into foundational issues that arise in the various special sciences. Methodological philosophy of science has deep connections with issues at the center of pure philosophy. It makes use of important results, for example, in traditional epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophy of language. It also connects in (...)
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  22. Mark Kac (1972). Advances in the Physical and Life Sciences. Washington,American Association for the Advancement of Science.score: 192.0
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  23. Michael Friedman (2013). Kant's Construction of Nature: A Reading of the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 189.0
    Michael Friedman's book develops a new and complete reading of this work and reconstructs Kant's main argument clearly and in great detail, explaining its relationship to both Newton's Principia and eighteenth-century scientific thinkers ...
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  24. Baruch A. Brody (1968). Science: Men, Methods, Goals. New York, W. A. Benjamin.score: 189.0
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  25. Michela Massimi (ed.) (2014). Philosophy and the Sciences for Everyone. Routledge.score: 189.0
    What is the origin of our universe? What are dark matter and dark energy? What is our role in the universe as human beings capable of knowledge? What makes us intelligent cognitive agents seemingly endowed with consciousness? Scientific research across both the physical and cognitive sciences raises fascinating philosophical questions. Philosophy and the Sciences For Everyone introduces these questions and more. It begins by asking what good is philosophy for the sciences before examining the (...)
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  26. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 187.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and (...)
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  27. Fritz Rohrlich (1990). Computer Simulation in the Physical Sciences. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:507 - 518.score: 186.0
    Computer simulation is shown to be philosophically interesting because it introduces a qualitatively new methodology for theory construction in science different from the conventional two components of "theory" and "experiment and/or observation". This component is "experimentation with theoretical models." Two examples from the physical sciences are presented for the purpose of demonstration but it is claimed that the biological and social sciences permit similar theoretical model experiments. Furthermore, computer simulation permits theoretical models for the evolution (...)
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  28. Alan H. Cromer (1997). Connected Knowledge: Science, Philosophy, and Education. Oxford University Press.score: 183.0
    When physicist Alan Sokal recently submitted an article to the postmodernist journal Social Text, the periodical's editors were happy to publish it--for here was a respected scientist offering support for the journal's view that science is a subjective, socially constructed discipline. But as Sokal himself soon revealed in Lingua Franca magazine, the essay was a spectacular hoax--filled with scientific gibberish anyone with a basic knowledge of physics should have caught--and the academic world suddenly awoke to the vast gap that has (...)
     
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  29. James Kern Feibleman (1972). Scientific Method. The Hague,Nijhoff.score: 180.0
  30. Maria Luisa Martini & Silvia Defrancesco (eds.) (2007). Saperi E Linguaggi a Confronto: Atti Dei Seminari Interdisciplinari Sui Linguaggi Delle Scienze Umane E Delle Scienze Fisiche. Università Degli Studi di Trento.score: 180.0
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  31. Johannes Witt-Hansen (1958). Exposition and Critique of the Conceptions of Eddington. Copenhagen, G.E.C. Gad.score: 180.0
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  32. Daniel J. Wilson (1990). Science, Community, and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930. University of Chicago Press.score: 177.0
    In the first book-length study of American philosophy at the turn of the century, Daniel J. Wilson traces the formation of philosophy as an academic discipline. Wilson shows how the rise of the natural and physical sciences at the end of the nineteenth century precipitated a "crisis of confidence" among philosophers as to the role of their discipline. Deftly tracing the ways in which philosophers sought to incorporate scientific values and methods into their outlook and to (...)
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  33. Kathleen Kuiper (ed.) (2010). The Ideas That Change the World: The Essential Guide to Modern Philosophy, Science, Math, and the Arts. Fall River Press/Britannica Educational Pub. In Association with Rosen Educational Services.score: 177.0
    The biological sciences -- Mathematics and the physical sciences -- The arts -- The social sciences, philosophy, and religion -- Politics and the law.
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  34. Rein Vihalemm (2007). Philosophy of Chemistry and the Image of Science. Foundations of Science 12 (3):223-234.score: 176.0
    The philosophical analysis of chemistry has advanced at such a pace during the last dozen years that the existence of philosophy of chemistry as an autonomous discipline cannot be doubted any more. The present paper will attempt to analyse the experience of philosophy of chemistry at the, so to say, meta-level. Philosophers of chemistry have especially stressed that all sciences need not be similar to physics. They have tried to argue for chemistry as its own type of (...)
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  35. Stefan Djupsjöbacka (2005). Dialogue in the Crisis of Representation: Realism and Antirealism in the Context of the Conversation Between Theologians and Quantum Physicists in Göttingen 1949-1961. Åbo Akademi University Press.score: 174.0
  36. Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (1):61 - 75.score: 173.0
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's work, a negative (...)
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  37. Joachim Schummer (1997). Towards a Philosophy of Chemistry. A Short Extract of This Paper Was First Read at the 10th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, Florence, August 19–25, 1995. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 28 (2):307-336.score: 173.0
    The paper shows epistemological, methodological and ontological peculiarities of chemistry taken as a classificatory science of materials using experimental methods. Without succumbing to standard interpretations of physical science, chemical methods of experimental investigation, classification, reference, theorizing, prediction and production of new entities are developed one by one as first steps towards a philosophy of chemistry. Chemistry challenges traditional concepts of empirical object, empirical predicate, reference frame and theory, but also the distinction commonly drawn between natural science and technology. (...)
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  38. Karl Pearson (1957/2004). The Grammar of Science. Dover Publications.score: 172.0
    "A remarkable book that influenced the scientific thought of an entire generation."-- Dictionary of Scientific Biography A major statement of the language, method, and concepts of the physical sciences, this 1892 volume traces not only the history of experimental investigation but also the efforts of philosophic minds to state and organize their findings intelligently. A classic in the philosophy of science, its author is the founder of modern statistics. Karl Pearson was among the most influential university teachers (...)
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  39. Michael Heller (1997). Essential Tension: Mathematics - Physics - Philosophy. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 2 (1):39-52.score: 162.0
    The author focuses on the tension "realism - idealism" in the philosophy of mathematics, but he does that from the perspective of a theoretical physicist. It is not only that one's standpoint in the philosophy of mathematics determines our understanding of the effectiveness of mathematics in physics, but also the fact that mathematics is so effective in physical sciences tells us something about the nature of mathematics.
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  40. M. H. Krieger (1993). Book Reviews : Paul Humphreys, The Chances of Explanation: Causal Explanation in the Social, Medical, and Physical Sciences. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 1989. Pp. X, 170, $29.50 (Cloth. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (2):252-253.score: 162.0
  41. Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (2006). What to Do? Upgrade! Topoi 25 (1-2):51-56.score: 162.0
    The contents of what we transmit in colleges and universities as philosophic traditions need upgrading. But so do the methods of transmission.
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  42. J. J. C. Smart (1977). Book Reviews : Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Edited by Colin Howson. New York: Cam Bridge University Press, 1976. Pp. VII + 344. $24.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 7 (4):425-426.score: 162.0
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  43. Ronald M. Yoshida (1977). Reduction in the Physical Sciences. Published for the Canadian Association for Publishing in Philosophy by Dalhousie University Press.score: 162.0
  44. Steven W. Horst (2007). Beyond Reduction: Philosophy of Mind and Post-Reductionist Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press.score: 159.0
    Contemporary philosophers of mind tend to assume that the world of nature can be reduced to basic physics. Yet there are features of the mind consciousness, intentionality, normativity that do not seem to be reducible to physics or neuroscience. This explanatory gap between mind and brain has thus been a major cause of concern in recent philosophy of mind. Reductionists hold that, despite all appearances, the mind can be reduced to the brain. Eliminativists hold that it cannot, and that (...)
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  45. G. Kelinhans Maarten, J. J. Buskes Chris & W. De Regt Henk (2010). Philosophy of the Natural Sciences: Philosophy of Physics / Richard DeWitt. Philosophy of Chemistry / Joachim Schummer. Philosophy of Biology / Matthew H. Haber ... [Et Al.]. Philosophy of Earth Science. [REVIEW] In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Philosophies of the Sciences. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 159.0
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  46. James Ladyman (2008). Structural Realism and the Relationship Between the Special Sciences and Physics. Philosophy of Science 75 (5):744-755.score: 153.0
    The primacy of physics generates a philosophical problem that the naturalist must solve in order to be entitled to an egalitarian acceptance of the ontological commitments he or she inherits from the special sciences and fundamental physics. The problem is the generalized causal exclusion argument. If there is no genuine causation in the domains of the special sciences but only in fundamental physics then there are grounds for doubting the existence of macroscopic objects and properties, or at least (...)
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  47. Fritz Rohrlich (1988). Pluralistic Ontology and Theory Reduction in the Physical Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):295-312.score: 153.0
    It is demonstrated that the reduction of a physical theory S to another one, T, in the sense that S can be derived from T holds in general only for the mathematical framework. The interpretation of S and the associated central terms cannot all be derived from those of T because of the qualitative differences between the cognitive levels of S and T. Their cognitively autonomous status leads to an epistemic as well as an ontological pluralism. This pluralism is (...)
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  48. Francis Bailly (2010). Mathematics and the Natural Sciences: The Physical Singularity of Life. Imperial College Press.score: 153.0
    This book identifies the organizing concepts of physical and biological phenomena by an analysis of the foundations of mathematics and physics.
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  49. Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.) (2003). Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 152.0
    Realism in Action is a selection of essays written by leading representatives in the fields of action theory and philosophy of mind, philosophy of the social sciences and especially the nature of social action, and of epistemology and philosophy of science. Practical reason, reasons and causes in action theory, intending and trying, and folk-psychological explanation are some of the topics discussed by these leading participants. A particular emphasis is laid on trust, commitments and social institutions, on (...)
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  50. Chrysostomos Mantzavinos (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 152.0
    This volume is a unique contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences, presenting the results of cutting-edge philosophers' research alongside critical discussions by practicing social scientists. The book is motivated by the view that the philosophy of the social sciences cannot ignore the specific scientific practices according to which social scientific work is being conducted, and that it will be valuable only if it evolves in constant interaction with theoretical developments in the social sciences. (...)
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