Search results for 'Physician and patient' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christina M. van Der Feltz-Cornelis (2002). The Impact of Factitious Disorder on the Physician-Patient Relationship. An Epistemological Model. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):253-261.score: 180.0
    Theoretical models for physician-patient communication in clinical practice are described in literature, but none of them seems adequate for solving the communication problem in clinical practice that emerges in case of factitious disorder. Theoretical models generally imply open communication and respect for the autonomy of the patient. In factitious disorder, the physician is confronted by lies and (self)destructive behaviour of the patient, who in one way or another tries to involve the physician in this (...)
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  2. Keith Bauer (2004). Cybermedicine and the Moral Integrity of the PhysicianPatient Relationship. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):83-91.score: 180.0
    Some critiques of cybermedicine claim that it is problematic because it fails to create physicianpatient relationships. But, electronically mediated encounters do create such relationships. The issue is the nature and quality of those relationships and whether they are conducive to good patient care and meet the ethical ideals and standards of medicine. In this paper, I argue that effective communication and compassion are, in most cases, necessary for the establishment of trusting and morally appropriate physicianpatient (...)
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  3. Marli Huijer & Guy Widdershoven (2001). Desires in Palliative Medicine. Five Models of the PhysicianPatient Interaction on Palliative Treatment Related to Hellenistic Therapies of Desire. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):143-159.score: 180.0
    In this paper, we explore the desires that play a role at the palliative stage and relate them to various approaches to patient autonomy. What attitude can physicians and other caregivers take to the desires of patients at the palliative stage? We examine this question by introducing five physicians who are consulted by Jackie, an imaginary patient with metastatic lung carcinoma. By combining the models of the physician-patient relationship developed by Emanuel and Emanuel (1992) and the (...)
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  4. Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno (1994). Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.score: 162.0
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received (...)
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  5. Douglas N. Walton (1985). Physician-Patient Decision-Making: A Study in Medical Ethics. Greenwood Press.score: 150.0
     
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  6. Christopher M. Burkle, Paul S. Mueller, Keith M. Swetz, C. Hook & Mark T. Keegan (2012). Physician Perspectives and Compliance with Patient Advance Directives: The Role External Factors Play on Physician Decision Making. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):31-.score: 144.0
    Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs). In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ (...)
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  7. Beverly Woodward (2001). Confidentiality, Consent and Autonomy in the Physician-Patient Relationship. Health Care Analysis 9 (3):337-351.score: 126.0
    In the practice of medicine there has long been a conflict between patient management and respect for patient autonomy. In recent years this conflict has taken on a new form as patient management has increasingly been shifted from physicians to insurers, employers, and health care bureaucracies. The consequence has been a diminshment of both physician and patient autonomy and a parallel diminishment of medical record confidentiality. Although the new managers pay lip service to the rights (...)
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  8. Gary B. Weiss (1984). Patient Truthfulness: A Test of Models of the Physician-Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):353-372.score: 120.0
    Little attention has been given in medical ethics literature to issues relating to the truthfulness of patients. Beginning with an actual medical case, this paper first explores truth-telling by doctors and patients as related to two prominent models of the physician-patient relationship. Utilizing this discussion and the literature on the truthfulness and accuracy of the information patients convey to doctors, these models are then critically assessed. It is argued that the patient agency (patient autonomy or contractual) (...)
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  9. Howard Brody (1987). The Physician-Patient Relationship: Models and Criticisms. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2).score: 120.0
    A review of the philosophical debate on theoretical models for the physician-patient relationship over the past fifteen years may point to some of the more productive questions for future research. Contractual models have been criticized for promoting a legalistic and minimalistic image of the relationship, such that another form of model (such as convenant) is required. Shifting from a contractual to a contractarian model (in keeping with Rawls' notion of an original position) provides an adequate response to many (...)
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  10. W. R. Albury (2001). The Medical Ethics of Erasmus and the Physician-Patient Relationship. Medical Humanities 27 (1):35-41.score: 120.0
    Desiderius Erasmus set out his views on medical ethics just over 500 years ago. Applying the characteristic approach of Renaissance Humanism, he drew upon a variety of classical sources to develop his own account of medical obligation. Of particular interest is Erasmus's attention to the patient's duties as well as the physician's. By treating this reciprocal relationship as a friendship between extreme unequals, Erasmus was able to maintain the nobility of the medical art and at the same time (...)
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  11. Greg Clarke, Robert T. Hall & Greg Rosencrance (2004). Physician-Patient Relations: No More Models. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):16 – 19.score: 120.0
    Currently, the common theoretical models of "preferred" decision-making relationships do not correspond well with clinical experience. This interview study of congestive heart failure (CHF) patients documents the variety of patient preferences for decision-making, and the necessity for attention to family involvement. In addition, these findings illustrate the confusion as to the designation of surrogate decision-makers and physicians in charge. We conclude that no single model of physician-patient decision-making should be preferred, and that physicians should first ask patients (...)
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  12. J. Strain James (1991). Chronic Illness and the Physician-Patient Relationship: A Response to the Hastings Center's "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness". Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2).score: 120.0
    The following article is a response to the position paper of the Hastings Center, "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness", a product of their three year project on Ethics and Chronic Care. The authors of this paper, three prominent bioethicists, Daniel Callahan, Arthur Caplan, and Bruce Jennings, argue that there should be a different ethic for acute and chronic care. In pressing this distinction they provide philosophical grounds for limiting medical care for the elderly and chronically ill. We give a critical (...)
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  13. D. A. Moros, R. Rhodes, B. Baumrin & J. J. Strain (1991). Chronic Illness and the Physician-Patient Relationship: A Response to the Hastings Center's "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness". Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2):161-181.score: 120.0
    The following article is a response to the position paper of the Hastings Center, “Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness”, a product of their three year project on Ethics and Chronic Care. The authors of this paper, three prominent bioethicists, Daniel Callahan, Arthur Caplan, and Bruce Jennings, argue that there should be a different ethic for acute and chronic care. In pressing this distinction they provide philosophical grounds for limiting medical care for the elderly and chronically ill. We give a critical (...)
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  14. A. Hessling & S. Schicktanz (2012). What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in Physician-Patient Interaction. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.score: 120.0
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physicianpatient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view (...)
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  15. Bethany Crandell Goodier & Michael Irvin Arrington (2007). Physicians, Patients, and Medical Dialogue in the NYPD Blue Prostate Cancer Story. Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (1):45-58.score: 120.0
    Extending literature on health information to entertainment television, we analyze the prostate cancer narrative presented in the police drama, NYPD Blue. We explain how the physician-patient interaction depicted on the show followed (and sometimes did not follow) the medical dialogue model. Findings reveal that the producers of this show advocate a more dialogic model of medical interaction. Portrayals of incompetent, ineffective physicians are contrasted with the superior, effective efforts of other physicians. The audience learns that a non-dialogic approach (...)
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  16. Arndt Heßling & Silke Schicktanz (2012). What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in PhysicianPatient Interaction. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.score: 120.0
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physicianpatient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view (...)
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  17. Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.) (2007). Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld.score: 120.0
     
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  18. H. Y. Vanderpool & G. B. Weiss (1984). Patient Truthfulness: A Test of Models of the Physician-Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):353-372.score: 120.0
    Little attention has been given in medical ethics literature to issues relating to the truthfulness of patients. Beginning with an actual medical case, this paper first explores truth-telling by doctors and patients as related to two prominent models of the physician-patient relationship. Utilizing this discussion and the literature on the truthfulness and accuracy of the information patients convey to doctors, these models are then critically assessed. It is argued that the patient agency (patient autonomy or contractual) (...)
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  19. Eugene V. Boisaubin (2004). Observations of Physician, Patient and Family Perceptions of Informed Consent in Houston, Texas. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):225 – 236.score: 116.0
    Informed consent is one of the most important ethical and legal principles in the United States, including Texas, and reflects a profound respect for individuals and their ability to make decisions in their own best interest. It is also a critical underpinning of medical practice, although how it is actually carried out has not been well studied. A survey was conducted in the private practices and a hospital in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas to ascertain how physicians, patients (...)
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  20. Somdatta Bhattacharyya (2007). Shades of Confidentiality in Physician-Patient Relationship In the Context of Mental Health. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld. 135.score: 114.0
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  21. Ratna Dutta Sharma (2007). Caraka and the Notification of the Indian Medical Council on Physician-Patient Relationship A Comparative Study. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld.score: 114.0
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  22. Nelly Tsouyopoulos (1994). Postmodernist Theory and the Physician-Patient Relationship. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).score: 114.0
    The author discusses the postmodernist claim that the grand theories have lost credibility, even in the field of medical science and practice. Rather than representing a shared reality among physician and patient, illness represents two quite distinct realities — the meaning of one being significantly and distinctively different from the meaning of the other. However, existential clinical narratives can function as important bridges between the world of the patient and the world of the physician. Such narratives (...)
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  23. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 108.0
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life determinations, (...)
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  24. Anne-Cathrine Naess, Reidun Foerde & Petter Andreas Steen (2001). Patient Autonomy in Emergency Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):71-77.score: 108.0
    Theoretical models for patient-physician communication in clinical practice are frequently described in the literature. Respecting patient autonomy is an ethical problem the physician faces in a medical emergency situation. No theoretical physician-patient model seems to be ideal for solving the communication problem in clinical practice. Theoretical models can at best give guidance to behavior and judgement in emergency situations. In this article the premises of autonomous treatment decisions are discussed. Based on a case-report we (...)
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  25. David Gary Smith & Lisa H. Newton (1984). Physician and Patient: Respect for Mutuality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1).score: 102.0
    Philosophers and physicians alike tend to discuss the physician-patient relationship in terms of physician privilege and patient autonomy, stressing the duty of the physician to respect the autonomy and the variously elaborated rights of the patient. The authors of this article argue that such emphasis on rights was initially productive, in a first generation of debate on medical ethical issues, but that it is now time for a second generation effort that will stress the (...)
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  26. Douglas O. Stewart & Joseph P. DeMarco (2005). An Economic Theory of Patient Decision-Making. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):153-164.score: 102.0
    Patient autonomy, as exercised in the informed consent process, is a central concern in bioethics. The typical bioethicist's analysis of autonomy centers on decisional capacity—finding the line between autonomy and its absence. This approach leaves unexplored the structure of reasoning behind patient treatment decisions. To counter that approach, we present a microeconomic theory of patient decision-making regarding the acceptable level of medical treatment from the patient's perspective. We show that a rational patient's desired treatment level (...)
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  27. D. Steinberg & E. A. Pomfret (2008). A Novel Boundary Issue: Should a Patient Be an Organ Donor for Their Physician? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):772-774.score: 102.0
    It is argued that organ donation from a patient to the patient's physician is ethically dubious because donation decisions will be inappropriately influenced and the negative public perceptions will result in more harm than good. It is suggested that to protect the perception of the physicianpatient relationship, avoid cynicism about medicine’s attitude to patient welfare and maintain trust in the medical profession, a new professional boundary should be established to prevent physicians from receiving organs (...)
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  28. R. C. McMillan (1995). Responsibility to or for in the Physician-Patient Relationship? Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (2):112-115.score: 102.0
    The threat of malpractice litigation in the United States is encouraging physicians again to assume responsibility for their patients. The fundamental ethical problem, however, is that this approach denies the patient's moral agency. In this essay, responsibility to patients, rather than for them, is discussed as an alternative to the emerging neo-paternalism. Responsibility to avoids the ethical problems of assuming responsibility for moral agents and could reduce the threat of litigation as well.
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  29. Alan Schwartz (2008). Medical Decision Making: A Physician's Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    Decision making is a key activity, perhaps the most important activity, in the practice of healthcare. Although physicians acquire a great deal of knowledge and specialised skills during their training and through their practice, it is in the exercise of clinical judgement and its application to individual patients that the outstanding physician is distinguished. This has become even more relevant as patients become increasingly welcomed as partners in a shared decision making process. This book translates the research and theory (...)
     
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  30. Robyn S. Shapiro, Kristen A. Tym, Jeffrey L. Gudmundson, Arthur R. Derse & John P. Klein (2000). Managed Care: Effects on the Physician-Patient Relationship. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (01):71-81.score: 98.0
    Over the past several years, healthcare has been profoundly altered by the growth of managed care. Because managed care integrates the financing and delivery of healthcare services, it dramatically alters the roles and relationships among providers, payers, and patients. While analysis of this change has focused on whether and how managed care can control costs, an increasingly important concern among healthcare providers and recipients is the impact of managed care on the physicianpatient relationship, but little data have been collected and (...)
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  31. Dorothy M. Owens (1999). Hospitality to Strangers: Empathy and the Physician-Patient Relationship. OUP USA.score: 98.0
    In an era of transition and tension in American health care, Dorothy M. Owens offers a model of empathic communication that benefits both patients and physicians. Drawing from concepts in the domains of psychology and theology, she constructs a model of empathy that is ethical and reciprocal. An integrated model of empathy recognizes the physical, psychological, spiritual, and social nature of human beings. Empathy is a clinically useful, time-effective communication skill that can be taught in medical and pastoral education. Dr. (...)
     
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  32. S. Kay Toombs (1987). The Meaning of Illness: A Phenomenological Approach to the Patient-Physician Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):219-240.score: 96.0
    This essay argues that philosophical phenomenology can provide important insights into the patient-physician relationship. In particular, it is noted that the physician and patient encounter the experience of illness from within the context of different "worlds", each "world" providing a horizon of meaning. Such phenomenological notions as focusing, habits of mind, finite provinces of meaning, and relevance are shown to be central to the way these "worlds" are constituted. An eidetic interpretation of illness is proposed. Such (...)
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  33. Antonio Casado Rochdaa (2009). Back to Basics in Bioethics: Reconciling Patient Autonomy with Physician Responsibility. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):56-68.score: 96.0
    Although bioethics is a lively and expanding interdisciplinary field, there is not enough research about the patient-doctor relationship, a central issue in philosophy of medicine. This article surveys the state of the field, paying attention to recent work by Alfred Tauber, and supplementing it with insights from Hans Jonas's philosophy of technology in order to propose a principle of responsible autonomy for health care. Based on a comparative look across different sub-fields in bioethics, the resulting model claims that (...) responsibility is essential to professional integrity, providing an alternative to other active trends emphasizing patient autonomy, such as Robert Veatch's contractual model. (shrink)
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  34. William E. Stempsey (1995). Incommensurability: Its Implications for the Patient/Physician Relation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):253-269.score: 96.0
    Scientific authority and physician authority are both challenged by Thomas Kuhn's concept of incommensurability. If competing "paradigms" or "world views" cannot rationally be compared, we have no means to judge the truth of any particular view. However, the notion of local or partial incommensurability might provide a framework for understanding the implications of contemporary philosophy of science for medicine. We distinguish four steps in the process of translating medical science into clinical decisions: the doing of the science, the appropriation (...)
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  35. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2010). Retraction: End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die? BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):20-.score: 96.0
    BackgroundBioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die."DiscussionAdvances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for (...)
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  36. Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.score: 96.0
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. (...)
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  37. Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer (2006). Trust Based Obligations of the State and Physician-Researchers to Patient-Subjects. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (9):542-547.score: 96.0
    When may a physician enroll a patient in clinical research? An adequate answer to this question requires clarification of trust-based obligations of the state and the physician-researcher respectively to the patient-subject. The state relies on the voluntarism of patient-subjects to advance the public interest in science. Accordingly, it is obligated to protect the agent-neutral interests of patient-subjects through promulgating standards that secure these interests. Component analysis is the only comprehensive and systematic specification of regulatory (...)
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  38. Carrie-Anne Marie Hains & Nicholas J. Hulbert-Williams (2013). Attitudes Toward Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Study of the Multivariate Effects of Healthcare Training, Patient Characteristics, Religion and Locus of Control. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):713-716.score: 96.0
    Next SectionPublic and healthcare professionals differ in their attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS), the legal status of which is currently in the spotlight in the UK. In addition to medical training and experience, religiosity, locus of control and patient characteristics (eg, patient age, pain levels, number of euthanasia requests) are known influencing factors. Previous research tends toward basic designs reporting on attitudes in the context of just one or two potentially influencing factors; we aimed to (...)
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  39. Mitchell S. Cappell (2011). The Physician-Administrator as Patient Distinctive Aspects of Medical Care. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (2):232-242.score: 96.0
    Although much has been written about how physicians react to their own illness, the subject of how health-care workers react differently to sick physicians compared to ordinary patients is largely unstudied (Klitzman 2008; Mandell and Spiro 1987; Mullan 1985; Pinner and Miller 1952; Sachs 1989; Schneck 1998). As a senior physician-administrator admitted to my hospital for a major illness, I was treated as a physician-administrator and local celebrity, rather than an ordinary patient, by everybody from physicians to (...)
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  40. Dan O'Hair (1986). Patient Preferences for Physician Persuasion Strategies. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (2).score: 96.0
    This study investigated patient preferences for various types of physician persuasion strategies. Four types of persuasion strategies were utilized which involved combination of high and low levels of affectivity and information. In addition, patient variables, receiver apprehension and health beliefs were introduced to predict preference choices by patients. Results indicated that patients are influenced in their decision-making (preferences) by the type of persuasive strategy employed. Further, patients with different characteristics and predispositions prefer different persuasive strategies. The results (...)
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  41. Charles B. Rodning (1992). Coping with Ambiguity and Uncertainty in Patient-Physician Relationships: II.Traditio Argumentum Respectus. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (3):147-156.score: 96.0
    A methodology of argumentation and a perspective of incredulity are essential ingredients of all intellectual endeavor, including that associated with the art and science of medical care.Traditio argumentum respectus (tradition of respectful argumentation) as a principled system of assessing the validity of beliefs, opinions, perceptions, data, and knowledge, is worthy of practice and perpetuation, because assessments of validity are susceptible to incompleteness, incorrectness, and misinterpretation. Since the latter may lead to ambiguity, uncertainty, anxiety, and animosity among the individuals (patients and (...)
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  42. Gopaldeb Chattopadhyay (2007). Patient-Physician Relationship for Conducting a Clinical Trial A Look on Ethical Aspects and Role of Statistical Designs. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld. 174.score: 96.0
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  43. C. Meyers (1992). The Impact of Physician Denial Upon Patient Autonomy and Well-Being. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (3):135-137.score: 96.0
    It is now widely accepted that a patient's ability to engage in autonomous decision-making can be seriously threatened when she denies significant aspects of her medical condition. In this paper I use a true case to reveal the harmful effects of physician denial upon patient autonomy and well-being. I suggest further that such physician denial may be more common than is generally acknowledged, since aspects of the contemporary medical ethos likely serve to reinforce rather than to (...)
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  44. Charles B. Rodning (1992). Coping with Ambiguity and Uncertainty in Patient-Physician Relationships: III. Negotiation. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (4):211-222.score: 96.0
    Since beliefs, interests, needs and values vary among individuals, potential for conflict or dispute exists in all areas of human endeavor, including a patient-physician relationship. Conflict- or dispute-resolution requires diligent and directed negotiation, which ideally is amicable, efficient, and sustainable, if the participants acknowledge the identity, individuality, and integrity of all parties involved. In this essay a concept ofprincipled negotiation is extrapolated to a patient-physician relationship and is exemplified by a case study. In addition, the validity (...)
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  45. Charles B. Rodning (1992). Coping with Ambiguity and Uncertainty in Patient-Physician Relationships: I. Leadership of a Physician. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 13 (2):91-101.score: 96.0
    A patient-physician relationship provides a milieu for a patient to achieve healing, solace, and reintegration of personhood. A patient's primary physician assumes a leadership role in that regard, coordinating and facilitating a regimen of analysis and therapy. The quality, quantity, and rapidity of technological advancements in the delivery of medical care, render any individual physician incomplete in terms of his ability to provide total care. Consequently, a succession of professional and paraprofessional personnel must be (...)
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  46. Amit K. Sharma (2007). Culture as Determinant of Patient-Physician Relationship in Ayurveda. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld. 50.score: 96.0
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  47. R. M. Veatch & W. E. Stempsey (1995). Incommensurability: Its Implications for the Patient/Physician Relation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):253-269.score: 96.0
    Scientific authority and physician authority are both challenged by Thomas Kuhn's concept of incommensurability. If competing “paradigms” or “world views” cannot rationally be compared, we have no means to judge the truth of any particular view. However, the notion of local or partial incommensurability might provide a framework for understanding the implications of contemporary philosophy of science for medicine. We distinguish four steps in the process of translating medical science into clinical decisions: the doing of the science, the appropriation (...)
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  48. Eike‐Henner W. Kluge (2000). Physicians' Practice Profiles and the Patient's Right to Know. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (3):235-239.score: 96.0
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  49. Edmund D. Pellegrino (2005). Some Things Ought Never Be Done: Moral Absolutes in Clinical Ethics. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):469-486.score: 90.0
    Moral absolutes have little or no moral standing in our morally diverse modern society. Moral relativism is far more palatable for most ethicists and to the public at large. Yet, when pressed, every moral relativist will finally admit that there are some things which ought never be done. It is the rarest of moral relativists that will take rape, murder, theft, child sacrifice as morally neutral choices. In general ethics, the list of those things that must never be done will (...)
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