Search results for 'Physician and patient History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David J. Rothman (2003/2008). Strangers at the Bedside: A History of How Law and Bioethics Transformed Medical Decision Making. Aldinetransaction.score: 201.0
    Introduction: making the invisible visible -- The nobility of the material -- Research at war -- The guilded age of research -- The doctor as whistle-blower -- New rules for the laboratory -- Bedside ethics -- The doctor as stranger -- Life through death -- Commissioning ethics -- No one to trust -- New rules for the bedside -- Epilogue: The price of success.
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  2. R. Puustinen (2000). Voices to Be Heard—the Many Positions of a Physician in Anton Chekhov's Short Story, A Case History. Medical Humanities 26 (1):37-42.score: 189.0
    Next SectionAnton Chekhov (1860-1904) dealt in many of his short stories and plays with various phenomena as encountered in everyday medical practice in late 19th century Russia. In A Case History (1898) Chekhov illustrates the physician's many positions in relation to his patient. According to Mikhail Bakhtin's philosophy of language, a speaker occupies a certain position from which he or she addresses the listener. A phenomenon may gain different meanings depending on the position from which it is (...)
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  3. Andreas-Holger Maehle (2009). Doctors, Honour, and the Law: Medical Ethics in Imperial Germany. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 183.0
    Disciplining doctors : medical courts of honour and professional conduct -- Medical confidentiality : the debate on private versus public interests -- Patient information and consent : self-determination versus paternalism -- Duties and habitus of a doctor : the literature on medical ethics.
     
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  4. Nikola Biller-Andorno (2004). The Use of the Placebo Effect in Clinical Medicine — Ethical Blunder or Ethical Imperative? Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):43-50.score: 174.0
    The current debate in medical ethics on placebos focuses mainly on their use in health research. Whereas this is certainly an important topic the discussion tends to overlook another longstanding but nevertheless highly relevant question, namely if and how the placebo effect should be employed in clinical practice. This paper describes the way the placebo effect is perceived in modern medicine and offers some historical reflections on how these perceptions have developed; discusses elements of a definition of the placebo effect; (...)
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  5. Martyn Evans, Rolf Ahlzén, Pekka Louhiala & J. Jill Gordon (eds.) (2008). Medical Humanities Companion. Radcliffe Publishing.score: 174.0
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  6. Christina M. van Der Feltz-Cornelis (2002). The Impact of Factitious Disorder on the Physician-Patient Relationship. An Epistemological Model. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):253-261.score: 168.0
    Theoretical models for physician-patient communication in clinical practice are described in literature, but none of them seems adequate for solving the communication problem in clinical practice that emerges in case of factitious disorder. Theoretical models generally imply open communication and respect for the autonomy of the patient. In factitious disorder, the physician is confronted by lies and (self)destructive behaviour of the patient, who in one way or another tries to involve the physician in this (...)
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  7. Keith Bauer (2004). Cybermedicine and the Moral Integrity of the PhysicianPatient Relationship. Ethics and Information Technology 6 (2):83-91.score: 168.0
    Some critiques of cybermedicine claim that it is problematic because it fails to create physicianpatient relationships. But, electronically mediated encounters do create such relationships. The issue is the nature and quality of those relationships and whether they are conducive to good patient care and meet the ethical ideals and standards of medicine. In this paper, I argue that effective communication and compassion are, in most cases, necessary for the establishment of trusting and morally appropriate physicianpatient (...)
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  8. Marli Huijer & Guy Widdershoven (2001). Desires in Palliative Medicine. Five Models of the PhysicianPatient Interaction on Palliative Treatment Related to Hellenistic Therapies of Desire. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):143-159.score: 168.0
    In this paper, we explore the desires that play a role at the palliative stage and relate them to various approaches to patient autonomy. What attitude can physicians and other caregivers take to the desires of patients at the palliative stage? We examine this question by introducing five physicians who are consulted by Jackie, an imaginary patient with metastatic lung carcinoma. By combining the models of the physician-patient relationship developed by Emanuel and Emanuel (1992) and the (...)
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  9. Farokh Erach Udwadia (2009). The Forgotten Art of Healing and Other Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 162.0
    These essays bring medical discoveries from ancient times to landmarks in modern medicine, and take the reader to twenty-first century biogenetics and molecular biology. This unique volume focuses on medical science as an art of healing, where modern medicine is not just restricted to science and technology.
     
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  10. Robert M. Veatch (2009). Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge. Oxford University Press.score: 162.0
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? (...)
     
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  11. Stephen Wear & Jonathan D. Moreno (1994). Informed Consent: Patient Autonomy and Physician Beneficence Within Clinical Medicine. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 6 (5):323-325.score: 156.0
    Substantial efforts have recently been made to reform the physician-patient relationship, particularly toward replacing the `silent world of doctor and patient' with informed patient participation in medical decision-making. This 'new ethos of patient autonomy' has especially insisted on the routine provision of informed consent for all medical interventions. Stronly supported by most bioethicists and the law, as well as more popular writings and expectations, it still seems clear that informed consent has, at best, been received (...)
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  12. Christopher M. Burkle, Paul S. Mueller, Keith M. Swetz, C. Hook & Mark T. Keegan (2012). Physician Perspectives and Compliance with Patient Advance Directives: The Role External Factors Play on Physician Decision Making. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):31-.score: 144.0
    Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs). In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ (...)
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  13. Douglas N. Walton (1985). Physician-Patient Decision-Making: A Study in Medical Ethics. Greenwood Press.score: 140.0
     
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  14. Rupinder K. Legha (2012). A History of Physician Suicide in America. Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (4):219-244.score: 134.0
    Over the course of the last century, physicians have written a number of articles about suicide among their own. These articles reveal how physicians have fundamentally conceived of themselves, how they have addressed vulnerability among their own, and how their self-identification has changed over time, due, in part, to larger historical changes in the profession, psychiatry, and suicidology. The suicidal physician of the Golden Age (1900–1970), an expendable deviant, represents the antithesis of that era’s image of strength and invincibility. (...)
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  15. Albert R. Jonsen (2000). A Short History of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine (...)
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  16. Fuat S. Oduncu & Stephan Sahm (2010). Doctor-Cared Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Perspective From Germany. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):371-381.score: 126.0
    The current article deals with the ethics and practice of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and dying. The debate about PAS must take the important legal and ethical context of medical acts at the end of life into consideration, and cannot be examined independently from physicians’ duties with respect to care for the terminally ill and dying. The discussion in Germany about active euthanasia, limiting medical intervention at the end of life, patient autonomy, advanced directives, and PAS is not fundamentally (...)
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  17. Beverly Woodward (2001). Confidentiality, Consent and Autonomy in the Physician-Patient Relationship. Health Care Analysis 9 (3):337-351.score: 120.0
    In the practice of medicine there has long been a conflict between patient management and respect for patient autonomy. In recent years this conflict has taken on a new form as patient management has increasingly been shifted from physicians to insurers, employers, and health care bureaucracies. The consequence has been a diminshment of both physician and patient autonomy and a parallel diminishment of medical record confidentiality. Although the new managers pay lip service to the rights (...)
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  18. Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.) (2007). Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld.score: 120.0
     
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  19. Gary B. Weiss (1984). Patient Truthfulness: A Test of Models of the Physician-Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):353-372.score: 112.0
    Little attention has been given in medical ethics literature to issues relating to the truthfulness of patients. Beginning with an actual medical case, this paper first explores truth-telling by doctors and patients as related to two prominent models of the physician-patient relationship. Utilizing this discussion and the literature on the truthfulness and accuracy of the information patients convey to doctors, these models are then critically assessed. It is argued that the patient agency (patient autonomy or contractual) (...)
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  20. Howard Brody (1987). The Physician-Patient Relationship: Models and Criticisms. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2).score: 112.0
    A review of the philosophical debate on theoretical models for the physician-patient relationship over the past fifteen years may point to some of the more productive questions for future research. Contractual models have been criticized for promoting a legalistic and minimalistic image of the relationship, such that another form of model (such as convenant) is required. Shifting from a contractual to a contractarian model (in keeping with Rawls' notion of an original position) provides an adequate response to many (...)
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  21. W. R. Albury (2001). The Medical Ethics of Erasmus and the Physician-Patient Relationship. Medical Humanities 27 (1):35-41.score: 112.0
    Desiderius Erasmus set out his views on medical ethics just over 500 years ago. Applying the characteristic approach of Renaissance Humanism, he drew upon a variety of classical sources to develop his own account of medical obligation. Of particular interest is Erasmus's attention to the patient's duties as well as the physician's. By treating this reciprocal relationship as a friendship between extreme unequals, Erasmus was able to maintain the nobility of the medical art and at the same time (...)
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  22. Greg Clarke, Robert T. Hall & Greg Rosencrance (2004). Physician-Patient Relations: No More Models. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):16 – 19.score: 112.0
    Currently, the common theoretical models of "preferred" decision-making relationships do not correspond well with clinical experience. This interview study of congestive heart failure (CHF) patients documents the variety of patient preferences for decision-making, and the necessity for attention to family involvement. In addition, these findings illustrate the confusion as to the designation of surrogate decision-makers and physicians in charge. We conclude that no single model of physician-patient decision-making should be preferred, and that physicians should first ask patients (...)
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  23. J. Strain James (1991). Chronic Illness and the Physician-Patient Relationship: A Response to the Hastings Center's "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness". Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2).score: 112.0
    The following article is a response to the position paper of the Hastings Center, "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness", a product of their three year project on Ethics and Chronic Care. The authors of this paper, three prominent bioethicists, Daniel Callahan, Arthur Caplan, and Bruce Jennings, argue that there should be a different ethic for acute and chronic care. In pressing this distinction they provide philosophical grounds for limiting medical care for the elderly and chronically ill. We give a critical (...)
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  24. D. A. Moros, R. Rhodes, B. Baumrin & J. J. Strain (1991). Chronic Illness and the Physician-Patient Relationship: A Response to the Hastings Center's "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness". Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (2):161-181.score: 112.0
    The following article is a response to the position paper of the Hastings Center, “Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness”, a product of their three year project on Ethics and Chronic Care. The authors of this paper, three prominent bioethicists, Daniel Callahan, Arthur Caplan, and Bruce Jennings, argue that there should be a different ethic for acute and chronic care. In pressing this distinction they provide philosophical grounds for limiting medical care for the elderly and chronically ill. We give a critical (...)
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  25. A. Hessling & S. Schicktanz (2012). What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in Physician-Patient Interaction. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.score: 112.0
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physicianpatient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view (...)
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  26. Bethany Crandell Goodier & Michael Irvin Arrington (2007). Physicians, Patients, and Medical Dialogue in the NYPD Blue Prostate Cancer Story. Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (1):45-58.score: 112.0
    Extending literature on health information to entertainment television, we analyze the prostate cancer narrative presented in the police drama, NYPD Blue. We explain how the physician-patient interaction depicted on the show followed (and sometimes did not follow) the medical dialogue model. Findings reveal that the producers of this show advocate a more dialogic model of medical interaction. Portrayals of incompetent, ineffective physicians are contrasted with the superior, effective efforts of other physicians. The audience learns that a non-dialogic approach (...)
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  27. Arndt Heßling & Silke Schicktanz (2012). What German Experts Expect From Individualized Medicine: Problems of Uncertainty and Future Complication in PhysicianPatient Interaction. Clinical Ethics 7 (2):86-93.score: 112.0
    ‘Individualized medicine’ is an emerging paradigm in clinical life science research. We conducted a socio-empirical interview study in a leading German clinical research group, aiming at implementing ‘individualized medicine’ of colorectal cancer. The goal was to investigate moral and social issues related to physicianpatient interaction and clinical care, and to identify the points raised, supported and rejected by the physicians and researchers. Up to now there has been only limited insight into how experts dedicated to individualized medicine view (...)
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  28. H. Y. Vanderpool & G. B. Weiss (1984). Patient Truthfulness: A Test of Models of the Physician-Patient Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (4):353-372.score: 112.0
    Little attention has been given in medical ethics literature to issues relating to the truthfulness of patients. Beginning with an actual medical case, this paper first explores truth-telling by doctors and patients as related to two prominent models of the physician-patient relationship. Utilizing this discussion and the literature on the truthfulness and accuracy of the information patients convey to doctors, these models are then critically assessed. It is argued that the patient agency (patient autonomy or contractual) (...)
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  29. Eugene V. Boisaubin (2004). Observations of Physician, Patient and Family Perceptions of Informed Consent in Houston, Texas. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (2):225 – 236.score: 109.3
    Informed consent is one of the most important ethical and legal principles in the United States, including Texas, and reflects a profound respect for individuals and their ability to make decisions in their own best interest. It is also a critical underpinning of medical practice, although how it is actually carried out has not been well studied. A survey was conducted in the private practices and a hospital in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas to ascertain how physicians, patients (...)
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  30. Ronald Schleifer & Jerry Vannatta (2006). The Logic of Diagnosis: Peirce, Literary Narrative, and the History of Present Illness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):363 – 384.score: 108.0
    This essay presents a theoretical construct upon which to base a working - "pragmatic" - definition of the History of Present Illness (HPI). The major thesis of this essay is that analysis of both the logic of hypothesis formation and literary narrative - especially detective stories - facilitates understanding of the diagnostic process. The essay examines three elements necessary to a successful development of a patient's HPI: the logic of hypothesis formation, based upon the work of the philosopher-logician, (...)
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  31. Renate G. Justin (1987). The Value History: A Necessary Family Document. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (3).score: 108.0
    Patients' wishes regarding health care and dying must be taken into consideration by their physicians. Competent patients need to record directives about their care in advance of a crisis situation. The primary care physician, seeing the patient at the time of a routine office visit, is in a favorable position to explore and record attitudes. A patient's value system should be part of a medical history before hospital admission. Details in a Value History Questionnaire facilitate (...)
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  32. Somdatta Bhattacharyya (2007). Shades of Confidentiality in Physician-Patient Relationship In the Context of Mental Health. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld. 135.score: 108.0
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  33. Ruth Macklin (1993). Enemies of Patients. Oxford University Press.score: 108.0
    A young man, terminally ill and in extreme suffering, asks to be removed from life support, requesting morphine first so he'll be asleep when the machine stops. His physician agrees, but the hospital's chief administrator intervenes, arguing that the morphine might itself cause death, leaving the physician open to criminal indictment for murder. To placate the administrator, the doctor and patient reach a grim compromise: life support will be disconnected first, and only after manifest signs of suffering (...)
     
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  34. Ratna Dutta Sharma (2007). Caraka and the Notification of the Indian Medical Council on Physician-Patient Relationship A Comparative Study. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld.score: 108.0
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  35. Nelly Tsouyopoulos (1994). Postmodernist Theory and the Physician-Patient Relationship. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).score: 108.0
    The author discusses the postmodernist claim that the grand theories have lost credibility, even in the field of medical science and practice. Rather than representing a shared reality among physician and patient, illness represents two quite distinct realities — the meaning of one being significantly and distinctively different from the meaning of the other. However, existential clinical narratives can function as important bridges between the world of the patient and the world of the physician. Such narratives (...)
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  36. Eric J. Cassell (2004). The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    Here is a thoroughly updated edition of a classic in palliative medicine. Two new chapters have been added to the 1991 edition, along with a new preface summarizing where progress has been made and where it has not in the area of pain management. This book addresses the timely issue of doctor-patient relationships arguing that the patient, not the disease, should be the central focus of medicine. Included are a number of compelling patient narratives. Praise for the (...)
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  37. Edmund D. Pellegrino (1988). For the Patient's Good: The Restoration of Beneficence in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 102.0
    In this companion volume to their 1981 work, A Philosophical Basis of Medical Practice, Pellegrino and Thomasma examine the principle of beneficence and its role in the practice of medicine. Their analysis, which is grounded in a thorough-going philosophy of medicine, addresses a wide array of practical and ethical concerns that are a part of health care decision-making today. Among these issues are the withdrawing and withholding of nutrition and hydration, competency assessment, the requirements for valid surrogate decision-making, quality-of-life determinations, (...)
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  38. Anne-Cathrine Naess, Reidun Foerde & Petter Andreas Steen (2001). Patient Autonomy in Emergency Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):71-77.score: 102.0
    Theoretical models for patient-physician communication in clinical practice are frequently described in the literature. Respecting patient autonomy is an ethical problem the physician faces in a medical emergency situation. No theoretical physician-patient model seems to be ideal for solving the communication problem in clinical practice. Theoretical models can at best give guidance to behavior and judgement in emergency situations. In this article the premises of autonomous treatment decisions are discussed. Based on a case-report we (...)
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  39. David Gary Smith & Lisa H. Newton (1984). Physician and Patient: Respect for Mutuality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1).score: 100.0
    Philosophers and physicians alike tend to discuss the physician-patient relationship in terms of physician privilege and patient autonomy, stressing the duty of the physician to respect the autonomy and the variously elaborated rights of the patient. The authors of this article argue that such emphasis on rights was initially productive, in a first generation of debate on medical ethical issues, but that it is now time for a second generation effort that will stress the (...)
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  40. D. Steinberg & E. A. Pomfret (2008). A Novel Boundary Issue: Should a Patient Be an Organ Donor for Their Physician? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):772-774.score: 100.0
    It is argued that organ donation from a patient to the patient's physician is ethically dubious because donation decisions will be inappropriately influenced and the negative public perceptions will result in more harm than good. It is suggested that to protect the perception of the physicianpatient relationship, avoid cynicism about medicine’s attitude to patient welfare and maintain trust in the medical profession, a new professional boundary should be established to prevent physicians from receiving organs (...)
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  41. Martin Klein (2004). Voluntary Active Euthanasia and the Doctrine of Double Effect: A View From Germany. Health Care Analysis 12 (3):225-240.score: 99.0
    This paper discusses physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and voluntary active euthanasia (VAE), supplies a short history and argues in favour of permitting both once rigid criteria have been set and the cases retro-reviewed. I suggest that among these criteria should be that VAE should only be permitted with one more necessary criterion: that VAE should only be allowed when physician assisted suicide is not a possible option. If the patient is able to ingest and absorb the medication (...)
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  42. Corina Dima-Cozma & Sebastian Cozma (2012). Religion and Medicine or the Spiritual Dimension of Healing. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):31-48.score: 99.0
    This paper analyses the relationship between religion and the field of medicine and health care in light of other recent studies. Generally, religion and spirituality have a positive impact on disease. For patients diagnosed with malignancies and chronic diseases, religion is an important dimension of healing. From ancient times, God has been considered an inspiration for the physician's knowledge and healing resources. Some authors have proposed a brief history of spiritual and religious states that the doctor can apply (...)
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  43. Douglas O. Stewart & Joseph P. DeMarco (2005). An Economic Theory of Patient Decision-Making. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (3):153-164.score: 98.0
    Patient autonomy, as exercised in the informed consent process, is a central concern in bioethics. The typical bioethicist's analysis of autonomy centers on decisional capacity—finding the line between autonomy and its absence. This approach leaves unexplored the structure of reasoning behind patient treatment decisions. To counter that approach, we present a microeconomic theory of patient decision-making regarding the acceptable level of medical treatment from the patient's perspective. We show that a rational patient's desired treatment level (...)
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  44. Alan Schwartz (2008). Medical Decision Making: A Physician's Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 98.0
    Decision making is a key activity, perhaps the most important activity, in the practice of healthcare. Although physicians acquire a great deal of knowledge and specialised skills during their training and through their practice, it is in the exercise of clinical judgement and its application to individual patients that the outstanding physician is distinguished. This has become even more relevant as patients become increasingly welcomed as partners in a shared decision making process. This book translates the research and theory (...)
     
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  45. S. Kay Toombs (1987). The Meaning of Illness: A Phenomenological Approach to the Patient-Physician Relationship. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):219-240.score: 96.0
    This essay argues that philosophical phenomenology can provide important insights into the patient-physician relationship. In particular, it is noted that the physician and patient encounter the experience of illness from within the context of different "worlds", each "world" providing a horizon of meaning. Such phenomenological notions as focusing, habits of mind, finite provinces of meaning, and relevance are shown to be central to the way these "worlds" are constituted. An eidetic interpretation of illness is proposed. Such (...)
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  46. Antonio Casado Rochdaa (2009). Back to Basics in Bioethics: Reconciling Patient Autonomy with Physician Responsibility. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):56-68.score: 96.0
    Although bioethics is a lively and expanding interdisciplinary field, there is not enough research about the patient-doctor relationship, a central issue in philosophy of medicine. This article surveys the state of the field, paying attention to recent work by Alfred Tauber, and supplementing it with insights from Hans Jonas's philosophy of technology in order to propose a principle of responsible autonomy for health care. Based on a comparative look across different sub-fields in bioethics, the resulting model claims that (...) responsibility is essential to professional integrity, providing an alternative to other active trends emphasizing patient autonomy, such as Robert Veatch's contractual model. (shrink)
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  47. William E. Stempsey (1995). Incommensurability: Its Implications for the Patient/Physician Relation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):253-269.score: 96.0
    Scientific authority and physician authority are both challenged by Thomas Kuhn's concept of incommensurability. If competing "paradigms" or "world views" cannot rationally be compared, we have no means to judge the truth of any particular view. However, the notion of local or partial incommensurability might provide a framework for understanding the implications of contemporary philosophy of science for medicine. We distinguish four steps in the process of translating medical science into clinical decisions: the doing of the science, the appropriation (...)
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  48. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2010). Retraction: End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die? BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):20-.score: 96.0
    BackgroundBioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die."DiscussionAdvances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for (...)
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  49. Roderick S. Hooker & Gregory L. Larkin (2010). Patient Willingness to Be Seen by Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Residents in the Emergency Department: Does the Presumption of Assent Have an Empirical Basis? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (8):1-10.score: 96.0
    Physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), and medical residents constitute an increasingly significant part of the American health care workforce, yet patient assent to be seen by nonphysicians is only presumed and seldom sought. In order to assess the willingness of patients to receive medical care provided by nonphysicians, we administered provider preference surveys to a random sample of patients attending three emergency departments (EDs). Concurrently, a survey was sent to a random selection of ED residents and PAs. (...)
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  50. Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer (2006). Trust Based Obligations of the State and Physician-Researchers to Patient-Subjects. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (9):542-547.score: 96.0
    When may a physician enroll a patient in clinical research? An adequate answer to this question requires clarification of trust-based obligations of the state and the physician-researcher respectively to the patient-subject. The state relies on the voluntarism of patient-subjects to advance the public interest in science. Accordingly, it is obligated to protect the agent-neutral interests of patient-subjects through promulgating standards that secure these interests. Component analysis is the only comprehensive and systematic specification of regulatory (...)
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