Search results for 'Physicians Professional ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Simon Shimshon Rubin & Omer Dror (1996). Professional Ethics of Psychologists and Physicians: Mortality, Confidentiality, and Sexuality in Israel. Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):213 – 238.score: 495.0
    Clinical psychologists' and nonpsychiatric physicians' attitudes and behaviors in sexual and confidentiality boundary violations were examined. The 171 participants' responses were analyzed by profession, sex, and status (student, resident, professional) on semantic differential, boundary violation vignettes, and a version of Pope, Tabachnick, and Keith-Spiegel's (1987) ethical scale. Psychologists rated sexual boundary violation as more unethical than did physicians (p<.001). Rationale (p<.01) and timing (p<.001) influenced ratings. Psychologists reported fewer sexualized behaviors than physicians (p<05). Professional experience (...)
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  2. Hani Tamim, Amr Jamal, Huda Al Shamsi, Abdulla Al Sayyari & Fayez Hejaili (2010). Professional Boundary Ethics Attitudes and Awareness Among Nurses and Physicians in a University Hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):21-32.score: 465.0
    This study sought to gauge ethical attitudes about professional boundary issues of physicians and nurses in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Respondents scored 10 relevant boundary vignettes as to their ethical acceptability. The group as a whole proved “aware/ ethically conservative,” but with the physicians' score falling on the “less ethically conservative” part of the spectrum compared to nurses. The degree of ethicality was more related to profession than to gender, with nurses being more “ethical” than (...). (shrink)
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  3. Robert M. Veatch (1980). Professional Ethics: New Principles for Physicians? Hastings Center Report 10 (3):16-19.score: 435.0
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  4. Lucie White (2010). Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide and the Professional Obligations of Physicians. Emergent Australasian Philosophers 3 (1).score: 423.0
    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have proved to be very contentious topics in medical ethics. Some ethicists are particularly concerned that allowing physicians to carry out these procedures will undermine their professional obligations and threaten the very goals of medicine. However, I maintain that the fundamental goals of medicine not only do not preclude the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide by physicians, but can in fact be seen to support these practices in some instances. I look (...)
     
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  5. Harmon L. Smith (1986). Professional Ethics and Primary Care Medicine: Beyond Dilemmas and Decorum. Duke University Press.score: 384.0
  6. Jolanda Dwarswaard, Medard Hilhorst & Margo Trappenburg (2011). The Doctor and the Market: About the Influence of Market Reforms on the Professional Medical Ethics of Surgeons and General Practitioners in The Netherlands. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 19 (4):388-402.score: 351.0
    To explore whether market reforms in a health care system affect medical professional ethics of hospital-based specialists on the one hand and physicians in independent practices on the other. Qualitative interviews with 27 surgeons and 28 general practitioners in The Netherlands, held 2–3 years after a major overhaul of the Dutch health care system involving several market reforms. Surgeons now regularly advertise their work (while this was forbidden in the past) and pay more attention to patients with (...)
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  7. Michael Davis (2003). What Can We Learn by Looking for the First Code of Professional Ethics? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):433-454.score: 315.0
    The first code of professional ethics must: (1)be a code of ethics; (2) apply to members of a profession; (3) apply to allmembers of that profession; and (4) apply only to members of that profession. The value of these criteria depends on how we define “code”, “ethics”, and “profession”, terms the literature on professions has defined in many ways. This paper applies one set of definitions of “code”, “ethics”, and “profession” to a part of what (...)
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  8. Robert Baker (ed.) (1999). The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 309.0
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of fee-for-service medicine (...)
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  9. D. Schmitz (2012). Terminating Pregnancy After Prenatal Diagnosis--With a Little Help of Professional Ethics? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):399-402.score: 306.0
    Termination of pregnancy after a certain gestational age and following prenatal diagnosis, in many nations seem to be granted with a special status to the extent that they by law have to be discussed within a predominantly medical context and have physicians as third parties involved in the decision-making process (‘indication-based’ approach). The existing legal frameworks for indication-based approaches, however, do frequently fail to provide clear guidance for the involved physicians. Critics, therefore, asked for professional ethics (...)
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  10. Robert M. Veatch (2005). Disrupted Dialogue: Medical Ethics and the Collapse of Physician-Humanist Communication (1770-1980). Oxford University Press.score: 306.0
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both fields were (...)
     
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  11. P. Sieghart (1982). Professional Ethics--For Whose Benefit? Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (1):25-32.score: 300.0
    In a wide ranging paper the author, a barrister, considers medical ethics in the context of divided loyalties, particularly those of a doctor employed by the National Health Service and those of doctors in occupational medicine. He argues for more specific professional codes of medical ethics, especially in relation to the need to obtain patients' explicit consent before medical details are transmitted to third parties. On the thorny question of when, if ever, can the good of society (...)
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  12. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.score: 288.0
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
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  13. Griffin Trotter (1997). The Loyal Physician: Roycean Ethics and the Practice of Medicine. Vanderbilt University Press.score: 280.0
  14. Marc A. Rodwin (1993). Medicine, Money, and Morals: Physicians' Conflicts of Interest. Oxford University Press.score: 276.0
    Conflicts of interest are rampant in the American medical community. Today it is not uncommon for doctors to refer patients to clinics or labs in which they have a financial interest (40% of physicians in Florida invest in medical centers); for hospitals to offer incentives to physicians who refer patients (a practice that can lead to unnecessary hospitalization); or for drug companies to provide lucrative give-aways to entice doctors to use their "brand name" drugs (which are much more (...)
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  15. Steven H. Miles (2004). The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 261.0
    This short work examines what the Hippocratic Oath said to Greek physicians 2400 years ago and reflects on its relevance to medical ethics today. Drawing on the writings of ancient physicians, Greek playwrights, and modern scholars, each chapter explores one passage of the Oath and concludes with a modern case discussion. This book is for anyone who loves medicine and is concerned about the ethics and history of the profession.
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  16. Laurence B. McCullough (1999). A Basic Concept in the Clinical Ethics of Managed Care: Physicians and Institutions as Economically Disciplined Moral Co-Fiduciaries of Populations of Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (1):77 – 97.score: 261.0
    Managed care employs two business tools of managed practice that raise important ethical issues: paying physicians in ways that impose conflicts of interest on them; and regulating physicians' clinical judgment, decision making, and behavior. The literature on the clinical ethics of managed care has begun to develop rapidly in the past several years. Professional organizations of physicians have made important contributions to this literature. The statements on ethical issues in managed care of four such organizations (...)
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  17. Frank H. Marsh (1992). Why Physicians Should Not Do Ethics Consults. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (3).score: 261.0
    Increasing complexities facing physicians negotiating the bedside decision continue to fuel the debate over who is the appropriate party to offer ethics consults, should one be needed, during the decision-making process. Some very good arguments have been put forth on behalf of clinical ethicists as being the proper and best party to engage in ethics consultations. However, serious questions remain about the role of the clinical ethicist and his ability to provide the necessary level of objectivity called (...)
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  18. Martine C. de Vries, Mirjam Houtlosser, Jan M. Wit, Dirk P. Engberts, Dorine Bresters, Gertjan Jl Kaspers & Evert van Leeuwen (2011). Ethical Issues at the Interface of Clinical Care and Research Practice in Pediatric Oncology: A Narrative Review of Parents' and Physicians' Experiences. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):18.score: 261.0
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  19. Birthe D. Pedersen (2008). The Role of Ethics in the Daily Work of Oncology Physicians and Molecular Biologists—Results of an Empirical Study. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 27 (1/4):75-101.score: 260.0
    This article presents results from an empirical investigation of the role and importance of ethics in the daily work of Danish oncologyphysicians and Danish molecular biologists. The study is based on 12 semi-structured interviews with three groups of respondents: a group of oncology physicians working in a clinic at a public hospital and two groups of molecular biologists conducting basic research, one group employed at a public university and the other in a private biopharmaceutical company.We found that oncology (...)
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  20. Laurence B. McCullough (2004). The Nature and Limits of the Physician's Professional Responsibilities: Surgical Ethics, Matters of Conscience, and Managed Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):3 – 9.score: 258.0
    The nature and limits of the physician's professional responsibilities constitute core topics in clinical ethics. These responsibilities originate in the physician's professional role, which was first examined in the modern English-language literature of medical ethics by two eighteenth-century British physician-ethicists, John Gregory and Thomas Percival. The papers in this annual clinical ethics number of the Journal explore the physician's professional responsibilities in the areas of surgical ethics, matters of conscience, and managed care.
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  21. Amy Snow Landa & Carl Elliott (2013). From Community to Commodity: The Ethics of Pharma‐Funded Social Networking Sites for Physicians. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):673-679.score: 240.0
    A growing number of doctors in the United States are joining online professional networks that cater exclusively to licensed physicians. The most popular are Sermo, with more than 135,000 members, and Doximity, with more than 100,000. Both companies claim to offer a valuable service by enabling doctors to “connect” in a secure online environment. But their business models raise ethical concerns. The sites generate revenue by selling access to their large networks of physician-users to clients that include global (...)
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  22. Jochen Vollmann (2002). Physician-Assisted Suicide in Patients with Aids in the Us: A Qualitative Interview Study on Changes in Professional Ethics and Practice. Ethik in der Medizin 14 (4):270-286.score: 238.3
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  23. Nancy Berlinger (2005). After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 234.0
    Medical error is a leading problem of health care in the United States. Each year, more patients die as a result of medical mistakes than are killed by motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. While most government and regulatory efforts are directed toward reducing and preventing errors, the actions that should follow the injury or death of a patient are still hotly debated. According to Nancy Berlinger, conversations on patient safety are missing several important components: religious voices, traditions, and (...)
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  24. David T. Ozar (1985). Social Ethics, the Philosophy of Medicine, and Professional Responsibility. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).score: 231.0
    The social ethics of medicine is the study and ethical analysis of social structures which impact on the provision of health care by physicians. There are many such social structures. Not all these structures are responsive to the influence of physicians as health professionals. But some social structures which impact on health care are prompted by or supported by important preconceptions of medical practice. In this article, three such elements of the philosophy of medicine are examined in (...)
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  25. Timothy D. Rawlins & John G. Bradley (1990). Planning for Hospital Ethics Committees: Meeting the Needs of the Professional Staff. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 2 (6):361-374.score: 231.0
    Hospital ethics committees (HECs) have historically been instituted top-down, often ignoring the needs of the professionals and patients who might use their services. Seventy-four physicians and 123 nurses participated in a hospital-wide needs assessment designed to [1] identify their perceptions of the functions of the HEC, [2] determine which services and educational programs were most desired, and [3] explore which forums were most preferred for discussion of ethical problems. Results indicated that utilization of the HEC focused around five (...)
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  26. Johannes Brinkmann (2002). Business and Marketing Ethics as Professional Ethics. Concepts, Approaches and Typologies. Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):159 - 177.score: 230.0
    Marketing ethics is normally marketed as a sub-specialization of business ethics. In this paper, marketing ethics serves as an umbrella term for advertising, PR and sales ethics and as an example of professional ethics. To structure the paper, four approaches are distinguished, with a focus on typical professional conflicts, codes, roles or climates respectively. Since the moral climate approachis more inclusive than the other approaches, the last part of the paper deals mainly with (...)
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  27. Joel Marks (2004). “There's No Room in the Worksheet” and Other Fallacies About Professional Ethics in the Curriculum. Teaching Ethics 4 (2):79-90.score: 230.0
    Despite the apparently universal recognition of a pervasive "success at any cost" amorality in the professional and business world, and the need to do something about it, attempts to establish a campus-wide professional ethics curriculum continue to encounter resistance at many colleges and universities. The main stumbling block seems to be a purely practical one: How do you fit a course on professional ethics into academic worksheets that are already over-crowded with essential technical courses in (...)
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  28. Ellen M. Harshman, James F. Gilsinan, James E. Fisher & Frederick C. Yeager (2005). Professional Ethics in a Virtual World: The Impact of the Internet on Traditional Notions of Professionalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):227 - 236.score: 230.0
    Numerous articles in the popular press together with an examination of websites associated with the medical, legal, engineering, financial, and other professions leave no doubt that the role of professions has been impacted by the Internet. While offering the promise of the democratization of expertise – expertise made available to the public at convenient times and locations and at an affordable cost – the Internet is also driving a reexamination of the concept of professional identity and related claims of (...)
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  29. W. Scott Dunbar (2005). Emotional Engagement in Professional Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):535-551.score: 230.0
    Recent results from two different studies show evidence of strong emotional engagement in moral dilemmas that require personal involvement or ethical problems that involve significant inter-personal issues. This empirical evidence for a connection between emotional engagement and moral or ethical choices is interesting because it is related to a fundamental survival mechanism rooted in human evolution. The results lead one to question when and how emotional engagement might occur in a professional ethical situation. However, the studies employed static dilemmas (...)
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  30. Cheryl Cates & Bryan Dansberry (2004). A Professional Ethics Learning Module for Use in Co-Operative Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):401-407.score: 230.0
    The Professional Practice Program, also known as the co-operative education (co-op) program, at the University of Cincinnati (UC) is designed to provide eligible students with the most comprehensive and professional preparation available. Beginning with the Class of 2006, students in UC’s Centennial Co-op Class will be following a new co-op curriculum centered around a set of learning outcomes Regardless of their particular discipline, students will pursue common learning outcomes by participating in the Professional Practice Program, which will (...)
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  31. Joseph A. Petrick & Robert F. Scherer (2005). Management Educators' Expectations for Professional Ethics Development. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):301 - 314.score: 230.0
    Professional associations, like the Academy of Management, exist to foster and promote scholarship, exchange among faculty, and an environment conducive to member professional ethics development. However, this last purpose of such organizations has received the least amount of attention. Moreover, previous research has demonstrated that there are differences in perceived needs for professional ethics development between tenured and untenured faculty. In the current research 260 Academy of Management members were surveyed. The research identified differences between (...)
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  32. Ji Yeon Han, Hyun Soon Park & Hyeonju Jeong (2013). Individual and Organizational Antecedents of Professional Ethics of Public Relations Practitioners in Korea. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):553-566.score: 230.0
    This study examines the effects of individual ethical values and organizational factors on the professional ethics of PR practitioners in Korea by considering a person–situation interactionist model. Individual ethical values are used as individual factors, and organizational factors consist of an organization’s reward and punishment for ethical/unethical behavior, the behavior of peers, and the ethical integrity of the chief ethics officer. The professional ethics of PR practitioners (the dependent variable) are classified into the following three (...)
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  33. A. Nello (2010). The Circumscribed Quadrature of Professional Ethics. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):143.score: 230.0
    The circumscribed quadrature of professional ethics aims to show the necessary shift from deontology to professional ethics, from deontological codes to ethical codes. While deontology and the deontological codes that materialise from it set their sights on professionals' responsibilities, professional ethics and the ethical codes that should derive from it would set their sights on the professional act, on its successful performance. In this way, the stress comes to be placed not only on (...)
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  34. G. Alexander, Mark Hall & John Lantos (2006). Rethinking Professional Ethics in the Cost-Sharing Era. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):W17-W22.score: 228.0
    Changes in healthcare financing increasingly rely upon patient cost-sharing to control escalating healthcare expenditures. These changes raise new challenges for physicians that are different from those that arose either under managed care or traditional indemnity insurance. Historically, there have been two distinct bases for arguing that physicians should not consider costs in their clinical decisions?an ?aspirational ethic? that exhorts physicians to treat all patients the same regardless of their ability to pay, and an ?agency ethic? that calls (...)
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  35. Androniki Panteli, Janet Stack & Harvie Ramsay (1999). Gender and Professional Ethics in the IT Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):51 - 61.score: 226.0
    In this paper, we discuss the ethical responsibility of the Information Technology (IT) industry towards its female workforce. Although the growing IT industry experiences skills shortages, there is a declining trend in the representation of women. The paper presents evidence that the IT industry is not gender-neutral and that it does little to promote or retain its female workforce. We urge that professional codes of ethics in IT should be revised to take into account the diverse needs of (...)
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  36. Judith P. Swazey (1991). Are Physicians a “Delinquent Community”?: Issues in Professional Competence, Conduct, and Self-Regulation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (8):581 - 590.score: 225.0
    This paper examines the moral responsibilities of physicians, toward themselves and their colleagues, their students and patients, and society, in terms of the nature and exercise of professional self-regulation. Some of the author's close encounters with cases involving research misconduct, behavioral impairment or deviance, and medical practice at the moral margin, are described to illustrate why, in Freidson's words, physicians are a delinquent community with respect to the ways they meet their responsibility to govern the competence and (...)
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  37. Kerry J. Breen (ed.) (2010). Good Medical Practice: Professionalism, Ethics and Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 225.0
    Written by specialist practitioners with vast teaching experience, this is a unique, timely and accessible text that reinforces a contemporary focus on professionalism in medical practice.
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  38. Mike W. Martin (2000). Meaningful Work: Rethinking Professional Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 224.0
    As commonly understood, professional ethics consists of shared duties and episodic dilemmas--the responsibilities incumbent on all members of specific professions joined together with the dilemmas that arise when these responsibilities conflict. Martin challenges this "consensus paradigm" as he rethinks professional ethics to include personal commitments and ideals, of which many are not mandatory. Using specific examples from a wide range of professions, including medicine, law, high school teaching, journalism, engineering, and ministry, he explores how personal commitments (...)
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  39. Emile Durkheim (1957/1992). Professional Ethics and Civic Morals. Routledge.score: 224.0
    In Professional Ethics and Civic Morals , Emile Durkheim outlined the core of his theory of morality and social rights which was to dominate his work throughout the course of his life. In Durkheim's view, sociology is a science of morals which are objective social facts, and these moral regulations form the basis of individual rights and obligations. This book is crucial to an understanding of Durkheim's sociology because it contains his much-neglected theory of the state as a (...)
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  40. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). Professional Ethics, Media and Good Governance. Intellection (01):Jan-June 2013.score: 224.0
    Philosophy is a vast subject and it is growing day by day in many branches although it has many traditional branches like epistemology, metaphysics, ethics and logic etc. Professional ethics is a discipline of philosophy and a part of subject called as ETHICS. In professional ethics we study the morals and code of conduct to be used while one practices in his/her profession. Media is also a profession and there is also a code of (...)
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  41. Desh Raj Sirswal (2013). Professional Ethics and Morality. In Icsp (ed.), Facilitation Volume in Honour of Prof. Sohan Raj Tater.score: 224.0
    Modern educational thoughts have made a powerful impact on civilized persons. The learner is a partner in the process of learning in our age. He is a disciple and is going to be a consumer as well as customer. There is a shift from education as a means of welfare and awareness to commercialization of education. In this background, Professional Ethics is partly comprised of what a professional should or should not do in the work -place. It (...)
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  42. Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge (2014). Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):333-345.score: 224.0
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of doctors and nurses working within two women’s prisons (...)
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  43. Judi L. Malone (2012). Professional Ethics in Context. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):463-477.score: 224.0
    The complexities of professional ethics are best understood and interpreted within their sociohistorical context. This paper focuses on the experience of 20 rural psychologists from across Canada, a context rife with demographic and practice characteristics that may instigate ethical issues. Employing hermeneutic phenomenology, these qualitative research results are indicative of professional struggles that impacted the participants’ experience of professional ethics and raised key questions about policy and practise. Concerns regarding competition highlight potential professional vulnerability, (...)
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  44. Jingqing Yang (2010). Serve the People: Understanding Ideology and Professional Ethics of Medicine in China. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):294-309.score: 224.0
    The article explores the communist ideology that has guided the formation of professional ethics of medicine in China. It first explores the constitutions of the People’s Republic of China and the Chinese Communist Party and codes of practice for medicine enforced since 1949, showing that the core of the ideology in relation to health provision and doctor–patient relationship has always been ‘serving the people wholeheartedly’. The ideological undertaking, however, has never been successfully exercised. In the pre-reform era, the (...)
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  45. Christopher Dowrick & Lucy Frith (eds.) (1999). General Practice and Ethics: Uncertainty and Responsibility. Routledge.score: 222.0
    Explores the ethical issues faced by GPs in their everyday practice, addressing two central themes; the uncertainty of outcomes and effectiveness in general practice and the changing pattern of general practitioners' responsibilities.
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  46. Heidi von Weltzien Hoivik (2002). Professional Ethics: A Managerial Opportunity in Emerging Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1/2):3 - 11.score: 222.0
    Professional Ethics, viewed as a managerial challenge and opportunity in this study, deals with the often overlooked conceptions, actions and behavior of individuals who see themselves both as members of a profession and as members of an organization. Managers have to deal with this dual loyalty and inherent potential for conflict. This is of particular importance for new types of organizations when wanting to develop and sustain an ethical platform for the ultimate goal - assuring that future business (...)
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  47. Nathan Carlin, Cathy Rozmus, Jeffrey Spike, Irmgard Willcockson, William Seifert, Cynthia Chappell, Pei-Hsuan Hsieh, Thomas Cole, Catherine Flaitz, Joan Engebretson, Rebecca Lunstroth, Charles Amos & Bryant Boutwell (2011). The Health Professional Ethics Rubric: Practical Assessment in Ethics Education for Health Professional Schools. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):277-290.score: 222.0
    A barrier to the development and refinement of ethics education in and across health professional schools is that there is not an agreed upon instrument or method for assessment in ethics education. The most widely used ethics education assessment instrument is the Defining Issues Test (DIT) I & II. This instrument is not specific to the health professions. But it has been modified for use in, and influenced the development of other instruments in, the health professions. (...)
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  48. William B. Irvine (2002). Robert B. Baker, Arthur L. Caplan, Linda L. Emanuel, and Stephen R. Latham, Eds., The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the AMA's Code of Ethics Has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society:The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the AMA's Code of Ethics Has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society. [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (2):354-356.score: 222.0
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  49. Stefan Konstanczak & Bogna Choinska (2011). Professional Ethics in Polish Medicine. Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe) 1 (1-2):14-20.score: 222.0
    Justifying the existence of professional ethics in medicine is usually connected with the traditions of a profession and with a humanistic dimension of these ethics, pointing at the same time to their culture-forming character. With such an attitude, professional ethics is treated as a part of all mankind’s output, and its teaching turns out to be an important element of preparation for taking part in culture. Taking into account the cultural meaning of professional (...), one should notice that all discussions about the character of relations of medicine and ethics exceed the very health care system. The dilemma outlined in the article deals with the problem whether the existence of medical ethics requires external regulations or is this also a creation of the very representatives of medicine and only they can formulate it. If the latter is to be assumed, ethics in medicine would have to be independent of other detailed ethics and it would not need to be included in any other more general theory. In the first solution, medical ethics is becoming a part of general ethics and, therefore, it would be justified to include it in a more general theory – bioethics. The authors indicate that professional ethics does not limit freedom of the staff but gives a special opportunity to use it. Records constituting its contents are mostly standardized by a professional group which sets criteria of recruitment on its own and general duties resting on their members. (shrink)
     
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