Search results for 'Physics Bibliography' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen G. Brush (1983). The History of Modern Physics: An International Bibliography. Garland.score: 132.0
  2. Paul Busch, Joachim Pfarr, Manfred L. Ristig & Ernst-Walther Stachow (2010). Quantum–Matter–Spacetime: Peter Mittelstaedt's Contributions to Physics and Its Foundations. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1163-1170.score: 60.0
    In a period of over 50 years, Peter Mittelstaedt has made substantial and lasting contributions to several fields in theoretical physics as well as the foundations and philosophy of physics. Here we present an overview of his achievements in physics and its foundations which may serve as a guide to the bibliography (printed in this Festschrift) of his publications. An appraisal of Peter Mittelstaedt’s work in the philosophy of physics is given in a separate contribution (...)
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  3. Harald Nordenson (1969). Relativity, Time and Reality: A Critical Investigation of the Einstein Theory of Relativity From a Logical Point of View. London, Allen & Unwin.score: 60.0
     
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  4. Jeffrey K. McDonough, Leibniz's Philosophy of Physics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 42.0
    entry for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP) This entry will attempt to provide a broad overview of the central themes of Leibniz’s philosophy of physics, as well as an introduction to some of the principal arguments and argumentative strategies he used to defend his positions. It tentatively includes sections entitled, The Historical Development of Leibniz’s Physics, Leibniz on Matter, Leibniz’s Dynamics, Leibniz on the Laws of Motion, Leibniz on Space and Time. A bibliography arranged by topic (...)
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  5. Lindsay Judson (ed.) (1995). Aristotle's Physics: A Collection of Essays. Clarendon Press.score: 42.0
    The Physics is one of Aristotle's masterpieces - a work of extraordinary intellectual power which has had a profound influence on the development of metaphysics and the philosophy of science, as well as on the development of physics itself. This collection of ten new essays by leading Aristotelian scholars examines a wide range of issues in the Physics and related works, including method, causation and explanation, chance, teleology, the infinite, the nature of time, the critique of atomism, (...)
     
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  6. Max Jammer (1993). Concepts of Space: The History of Theories of Space in Physics. Dover Publications.score: 36.0
    Newly updated study surveys concept of space from standpoint of historical development. Space in antiquity, Judeo-Christian ideas about space, Newton’s concept of absolute space, space from 18th century to present. Extensive new chapter (6) reviews changes in philosophy of space since publication of second edition (1969). Numerous original quotations and bibliographical references. "...admirably compact and swiftly paced style."—Philosophy of Science. Foreword by Albert Einstein. Bibliography.
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  7. Erasmo Recami (2001). Superluminal Motions? A Bird's-Eye View of the Experimental Situation. Foundations of Physics 31 (7):1119-1135.score: 30.0
    In this article, after a theoretical introduction and a sketch of some related long-standing predictions, a bird's-eye view is presented—with the help of nine figures—of the various experimental sectors of physics in which Superluminal motions seem to appear (thus contributing support to those past predictions). In particular, a panorama is presented of the experiments with evanescent waves and/or tunnelling photons, and with the “localized Superluminal solutions” to the Maxwell equations (like the so-called X-shaped beams). The present review is brief, (...)
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  8. Rob Clifton (2004). Quantum Entanglements: Selected Papers. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Rob Clifton was one of the most brilliant and productive researchers in the foundations and philosophy of quantum theory, who died tragically at the age of 38. Jeremy Butterfield and Hans Halvorson collect fourteen of his finest papers here, drawn from the latter part of his career (1995-2002), all of which combine exciting philosophical discussion with rigorous mathematical results. Many of these papers break wholly new ground, either conceptually or technically. Others resolve a vague controversy intoa precise technical problem, which (...)
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  9. Andrew Janiak & Eric Schliesser (eds.) (2012). Interpreting Newton: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Andrew Janiak and Eric Schliesser; Part I. Newton and his Contemporaries: 1. Newton's law-constitutive approach to bodies: a response to Descartes Katherine Brading; 2. Leibniz, Newton and force Daniel Garber; 3. Locke's qualified embrace of Newton's Principia Mary Domski; 4. What geometry postulates: Newton and Barrow on the relationship of mathematics to nature Katherine Dunlop; Part II. Philosophical Themes in Newton: 5. Cotes' queries: Newton's Empiricism and Conceptions of Matter Zvi Biener and Chris Smeenk; 6. (...)
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  10. Tony Roark (2011). Aristotle on Time: A Study of the Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Times New and Old: 1. McTaggart's systems; 2. Countenancing the Doxai; Part II. The Mater of Time: Motion: 3. Time is not motion; 4. Aristotelian motion (Kinesis); 5. 'The before and after in motion'; Part III. The Form of Time: Perception: 6. Number (Arithmos) and perception (Aisthesis); 7. On a moment's notice; 8. The role of imagination; 9. Time and the common perceptibles; 10. The hylomorphic interpretation illustrated; Part IV. Simultaneity and Temporal (...)
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  11. Solomon Feferman, Incompleteness: The Proof and Paradox of Kurt Gödel.score: 24.0
    Like Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, Gödel’s incompleteness theorem has captured the public imagination, supposedly demonstrating that there are absolute limits to what can be known. More specifically, it is thought to tell us that there are mathematical truths which can never be proved. These are among the many misconceptions and misuses of Gödel’s theorem and its consequences. Incompleteness has been held to show, for example, that there cannot be a Theory of Everything, the so-called holy grail of modern physics. Some (...)
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  12. Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.) (2006). A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    A Companion to Ancient Philosophy provides a comprehensive and current overview of the history of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy from its origins until late antiquity. Comprises an extensive collection of original essays, featuring contributions from both rising stars and senior scholars of ancient philosophy Integrates analytic and continental traditions Explores the development of various disciplines, such as mathematics, logic, grammar, physics, and medicine, in relation to ancient philosophy Includes an illuminating introduction, bibliography, chronology, maps and an index.
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  13. Neven Leddy & Avi Lifschitz (eds.) (2009). Epicurus in the Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation.score: 24.0
    Eighteenth-century Epicureanism is often viewed as radical, anti-religious, and politically dangerous. But to what extent does this simplify the ancient philosophy and underestimate its significance to the Enlightenment? Through a pan-European analysis of Enlightenment centres from Scotland to Russia via the Netherlands, France and Germany, contributors argue that elements of classical Epicureanism were appropriated by radical and conservative writers alike. They move beyond literature and political theory to examine the application of Epicurean ideas in domains as diverse as physics, (...)
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  14. Stuart Shanker (ed.) (1996). Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Volume 9 of the Routledge History of Philosophy surveys ten key topics in the Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Each article is written by one of the world's leading experts in that field. The papers provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject in question, and are written in a way that is accessible to philosophy undergraduates and to those outside of philosophy who are interested in these subjects. Each chapter contains an extensive bibliography of (...)
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  15. D. N. Sedley (ed.) (2012). The Philosophy of Antiochus. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Antiochus' biography Myrto Hatzimichali; 2. Antiochus and the Academy Roberto Polito; 3. Antiochus and Asclepiades: medical and philosophical sectarianism at the end of the Hellenistic era Rebecca Flemming; 4. Antiochus as historian of philosophy David Sedley; 5. Antiochus' epistemology Charles Brittain; 6. Antiochus on contemplation and the happy life Georgia Tsouni; 7. Antiochus, Aristotle, and the Stoics on degrees of happiness T. H. Irwin; 8. Antiochus on social virtue Malcolm Schofield; 9. Antiochus on (...) Brad Inwood; 10. Antiochus' metaphysics G. R. Boys-Stones; 11. The neutralizing argument: Carneades, Antiochus, Cicero Malcolm Schofield; 12. Varro and Antiochus David Blank; 13. Other followers of Antiochus Carlos Le;vy; 14. Antiochus and Platonism Mauro Bonazzi; Appendix: a guide to the testimonies for Antiochus David Sedley; Bibliography. (shrink)
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  16. Peter J. Bowler (2001). Reconciling Science and Religion: THE DEBATE IN EARLY-TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITAIN. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Although much has been written about the vigorous debates over science and religion in the Victorian era, little attention has been paid to their continuing importance in early twentieth-century Britain. Reconciling Science and Religion provides a comprehensive survey of the interplay between British science and religion from the late nineteenth century to World War II. Peter J. Bowler argues that unlike the United States, where a strong fundamentalist opposition to evolutionism developed in the 1920s (most famously expressed in the Scopes (...)
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  17. Mario Augusto Bunge (2001). Scientific Realism: Selected Essays of Mario Bunge. Prometheus Books.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: I. METAPHYSICS -- 1. How Do Realism, Materialism, and Dialectics Fare in Contemporary Science? (1973) -- 2. New Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous (1954) -- 3. Energy: Between Physics and Metaphysics (2000) -- 4. The Revival of Causality (1982) -- 5. Emergence and the Mind (1977) -- 6 SCIENTIFIC REALISM -- 6. The Status of Concepts (1981) -- 7. Popper's Unworldly World 3 (1981) --II. METHODOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE -- 8. On Method (...)
     
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  18. Philosophica Fennica (2004). Annotated Bibliography of Jaakko Hintikka. In D. Kolak & J. Symons (eds.), Quantifiers, Questions and Quantum Physics. Springer. 273.score: 24.0
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  19. Nicholas Hammond (ed.) (2003). The Cambridge Companion to Pascal. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and nonspecialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. Blaise Pascal (1623-1662) occupies a position of pivotal importance in many domains: philosophy, mathematics, physics, religious polemics and (...)
     
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  20. Gerardo Bruni (ed.) (1932). The De differentia retoricae, ethicae et politicae. Cincinnati [Etc.]Benziger Brothers.score: 24.0
    Edward Aloysius Pace, philosopher and educator, by J. H. Ryan.-Neo-scholastic philosophy in American Catholic culture, by C. A. Hart.- The significance of Suarez for a revival of scholasticism, by J. F. McCormick.- The new physics and scholasticism, by F. A. Walsh.- The new humanism and standards, by L. R. Ward.- The purpose of the state, by E. F. Murphy.- The concept of beauty in St. Thomas Aquinas, by G. B. Phelan.- The knowableness of God: its relation to the theory (...)
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  21. Edwin T. Jaynes (1993). Vita and Bibliography Of. In E. T. Jaynes, Walter T. Grandy & Peter W. Milonni (eds.), Physics and Probability: Essays in Honor of Edwin T. Jaynes. Cambridge University Press. 277.score: 24.0
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  22. D. Kolak & J. Symons (eds.) (2004). Quantifiers, Questions and Quantum Physics. Springer.score: 24.0
    This book includes a comprehensive overview of Hintikka's philosophy by Dan Kolak and John Symons and an annotated bibliography of Hintikka's work.
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  23. I. Quan (1999). Bibliography of the Writings of Michael Redhead. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 66--224.score: 24.0
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  24. Michael Redhead (1999). Bibliography of the Writings Of. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 66--224.score: 24.0
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  25. Slobodan Perovic (2011). Missing Experimental Challenges to the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 42 (1):32-42.score: 21.0
    The success of particle detection in high energy physics colliders critically depends on the criteria for selecting a small number of interactions from an overwhelming number that occur in the detector. It also depends on the selection of the exact data to be analyzed and the techniques of analysis. The introduction of automation into the detection process has traded the direct involvement of the physicist at each stage of selection and analysis for the efficient handling of vast amounts of (...)
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  26. Ioannis E. Antoniou (2002). Caratheodory and the Foundations of Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics. Foundations of Physics 32 (4):627-641.score: 21.0
    Constantin Caratheodory offered the first systematic and contradiction free formulation of thermodynamics on the basis of his mathematical work on Pfaff forms. Moreover, his work on measure theory provided the basis for later improved formulations of thermodynamics and physics of continua where extensive variables are measures and intensive variables are densities. Caratheodory was the first to see that measure theory and not topology is the natural tool to understand the difficulties (ergodicity, approach to equilibrium, irreversibility) in the Foundations of (...)
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  27. Olival Freire Jr (2004). The Historical Roots of ''Foundations of Quantum Physics'' as a Field of Research (1950–1970). Foundations of Physics 34 (11):1741-1760.score: 21.0
    The rising interest, in the late 20th century, in the foundations of quantum physics, a subject in which Franco Selleri has excelled, has suggested the fair question: how did it become so? The current answer says that experiments have allowed to bring into the laboratories some previous gedanken experiments, beginning with those about EPR and related to Bell’s inequalities. I want to explore an alternative view, by which there would have been, before Bell’s inequalities experimental tests, a change in (...)
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  28. Paul Benioff (2002). Towards a Coherent Theory of Physics and Mathematics. Foundations of Physics 32 (7):989-1029.score: 21.0
    As an approach to a Theory of Everything a framework for developing a coherent theory of mathematics and physics together is described. The main characteristic of such a theory is discussed: the theory must be valid and and sufficiently strong, and it must maximally describe its own validity and sufficient strength. The mathematical logical definition of validity is used, and sufficient strength is seen to be a necessary and useful concept. The requirement of maximal description of its own validity (...)
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  29. Wolfgang Kundt (2007). Fundamental Physics. Foundations of Physics 37 (9):1317-1369.score: 21.0
    A survey is given of the elegant physics of N-particle systems, both classical and quantal, non-relativistic (NR) and relativistic, non-gravitational (SR) and gravitational (GR). Chapter 1 deals exclusively with NR systems; the correspondence between classical and quantal systems is highlighted and summarized in two tables of Sec. 1.3. Chapter 2 generalizes Chapter 1 to the relativistic regime, including Maxwell’s theory of electromagnetism. Chapter 3 follows Einstein in allowing gravity to curve the spacetime arena; its Sec. 3.2 is devoted to (...)
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  30. George F. R. Ellis (2006). Physics and the Real World. Foundations of Physics 36 (2):227-262.score: 21.0
    Physics and chemistry underlie the nature of all the world around us, including human brains. Consequently some suggest that in causal terms, physics is all there is. However, we live in an environment dominated by objects embodying the outcomes of intentional design (buildings, computers, teaspoons). The present day subject of physics has nothing to say about the intentionality resulting in existence of such objects, even though this intentionality is clearly causally effective. This paper examines the claim that (...)
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  31. Arkady Plotnitsky (2011). On the Reasonable and Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):466-491.score: 21.0
    The point of departure for this article is Werner Heisenberg’s remark, made in 1929: “It is not surprising that our language [or conceptuality] should be incapable of describing processes occurring within atoms, for … it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. … Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory [quantum mechanics]—which seems entirely (...)
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  32. Paolo Budinich (2002). From the Geometry of Pure Spinors with Their Division Algebras to Fermion Physics. Foundations of Physics 32 (9):1347-1398.score: 19.0
    The Cartan equations defining simple spinors (renamed “pure” by C. Chevalley) are interpreted as equations of motion in compact momentum spaces, in a constructive approach in which at each step the dimensions of spinor space are doubled while those of momentum space increased by two. The construction is possible only in the frame of the geometry of simple or pure spinors, which imposes contraint equations on spinors with more than four components, and then momentum spaces result compact, isomorphic to invariant-mass-spheres (...)
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  33. Milan M. Ćirković (2005). Physics Versus Semantics: A Puzzling Case of the Missing Quantum Theory. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (5):817-838.score: 19.0
    A case for the project of excising of confusion and obfuscation in the contemporary quantum theory initiated and promoted by David Deutsch has been made. It has been argued that at least some theoretical entities which are conventionally labelled as “interpretations” of quantum mechanics are in fact full-blooded physical theories in their own right, and as such are falsifiable, at least in principle. The most pertinent case is the one of the so-called “Many-Worlds Interpretation” (MWI) of Everett and others. This (...)
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  34. Agustín Vicente (2006). On the Causal Completeness of Physics. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 20 (2):149 – 171.score: 18.0
    According to an increasing number of authors, the best, if not the only, argument in favour of physicalism is the so-called 'overdetermination argument'. This argument, if sound, establishes that all the entities that enter into causal interactions with the physical world are physical. One key premise in the overdetermination argument is the principle of the causal closure of the physical world, said to be supported by contemporary physics. In this paper, I examine various ways in which physics may (...)
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  35. Tim Maudlin (2007/2009). The Metaphysics Within Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    A modest proposal concerning laws, counterfactuals, and explanations - - Why be Humean? -- Suggestions from physics for deep metaphysics -- On the passing of time -- Causation, counterfactuals, and the third factor -- The whole ball of wax -- Epilogue : a remark on the method of metaphysics.
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  36. Douglas Kutach (2013). Causation and Its Basis in Fundamental Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    I provide a comprehensive metaphysics of causation based on the idea that fundamentally things are governed by the laws of physics, and that derivatively difference-making can be assessed in terms of what fundamental laws of physics imply for hypothesized events. Highlights include a general philosophical methodology, the fundamental/derivative distinction, and my mature account of causal asymmetry.
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  37. Markus Schrenk (2009). Can Physics Ever Be Complete If There is No Fundamental Level in Nature? Dialectica 63 (2):205-208.score: 18.0
    In their recent book Every Thing Must Go Ladyman and Ross (Ladyman et al. 2007) claim: (1) Physics is analytically complete since it is the only science that cannot be left incomplete (cf. Ladyman et al. 2007, 283). (2) There might not be an ontologically fundamental level (cf. Ladyman et al. 2007, 178). (3) We should not admit anything into our ontology unless it has explanatory and predictive utility (cf. Ladyman et al. 2007, 179). In this discussion note I (...)
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  38. Christian Thomas Kohl (2008). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. Indian International Journal of Buddhist Studies 9 (2008):45-62.score: 18.0
    Abstract. Rudyard Kipling, the famous english author of « The Jungle Book », born in India, wrote one day these words: « Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet ». In my paper I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising parallelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of (...)
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  39. Christian Thomas Kohl (2007). Buddhism and Quantum Physics. A Strange Parallelism of Two Concepts of Reality. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (1):69-82.score: 18.0
    Rudyard Kipling, the famous English author of The 'Jungle Book', born in India, wrote one day these words: 'Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet'. In my Essay I show that Kipling was not completely right. I try to show the common ground between Buddhist philosophy and quantum physics. There is a surprising paralelism between the philosophical concept of reality articulated by Nagarjuna and the physical concept of reality implied by quantum (...). For neither is there a fundamental core to reality; rather, reality concists of systems of interacting objects. Such concepts of reality cannot be reconciled with the substantial, subjective, holistic or instrumentalistic concepts of reality that underlie modern modes of thought. (shrink)
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  40. Nancy Cartwright (1983). How the Laws of Physics Lie. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In this sequence of philosophical essays about natural science, the author argues that fundamental explanatory laws, the deepest and most admired successes of modern physics, do not in fact describe regularities that exist in nature. Cartwright draws from many real-life examples to propound a novel distinction: that theoretical entities, and the complex and localized laws that describe them, can be interpreted realistically, but the simple unifying laws of basic theory cannot.
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  41. Brigitte Falkenburg (2011). What Are the Phenomena of Physics? Synthese 182 (1):149-163.score: 18.0
    Depending on different positions in the debate on scientific realism, there are various accounts of the phenomena of physics. For scientific realists like Bogen and Woodward, phenomena are matters of fact in nature, i.e., the effects explained and predicted by physical theories. For empiricists like van Fraassen, the phenomena of physics are the appearances observed or perceived by sensory experience. Constructivists, however, regard the phenomena of physics as artificial structures generated by experimental and mathematical methods. My paper (...)
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  42. J. van Brakel (2010). Chemistry and Physics: No Need for Metaphysical Glue. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):123-136.score: 18.0
    Using the notorious bridge law “water is H 2 O” and the relation between molecular structure and quantum mechanics as examples, I argue that it doesn’t make sense to aim for specific definition(s) of intertheoretical or interdiscourse relation(s) between chemistry and physics (reduction, supervenience, what have you). Proposed definitions of interdiscourse and part-whole relations are interesting only if they provide insight in the variegated interconnected patchwork of theories and beliefs. There is “automatically” some sort of interdiscourse relation if different (...)
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  43. Maurice R. Kibler (2007). From the Mendeleev Periodic Table to Particle Physics and Back to the Periodic Table. Foundations of Chemistry 9 (3):221-234.score: 18.0
    We briefly describe in this paper the passage from Mendeleev’s chemistry (1869) to atomic physics (in the 1900’s), nuclear physics (in 1932) and particle physics (from 1953 to 2006). We show how the consideration of symmetries, largely used in physics since the end of the 1920’s, gave rise to a new format of the periodic table in the 1970’s. More specifically, this paper is concerned with the application of the group SO(4,2)⊗SU(2) to the periodic table of (...)
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  44. Amit Hagar (2014). Discrete or Continuous? The Quest for Fundamental Length in Modern Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    A book on the notion of fundamental length, covering issues in the philosophy of math, metaphysics, and the history and the philosophy of modern physics, from classical electrodynamics to current theories of quantum gravity. Published (2014) in Cambridge University Press.
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  45. Bradley Monton (2010). Mctaggart and Modern Physics. Philosophia 38 (2):257-264.score: 18.0
    This paper delves into McTaggart’s metaphysical account of reality without time, and compares and contrasts McTaggart’s account with the account of reality given by modern physics. This comparison is of interest, because there are suggestions from contemporary physics that there is no time at the fundamental level. Physicists and philosophers of physics recognize that we do not have a good understanding of how the world could be such that time is unreal. I argue that, from the perspective (...)
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  46. Aharon Kantorovich (2009). Ontic Structuralism and the Symmetries of Particle Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (1):73 - 84.score: 18.0
    According to structural realism, in mature science there is structural continuity along theoretical change. A major counterexample to this thesis is the transition from the Eightfold Way to the Standard Model in particle physics. Nevertheless, the notion of structure is significantly important in comprehending the theoretical picture of particle physics, where particles change and undergo transmutations, while the only thing which remains unchanged is the basic structure, i.e. the symmetry group which controls the transmutations. This kind of view (...)
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  47. John Honner (1987). The Description of Nature: Niels Bohr and the Philosophy of Quantum Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Niels Bohr, founding father of modern atomic physics and quantum theory, was as original a philosopher as he was a physicist. This study explores several dimensions of Bohr's vision: the formulation of quantum theory and the problems associated with its interpretation, the notions of complementarity and correspondence, the debates with Einstein about objectivity and realism, and his sense of the infinite harmony of nature. Honner focuses on Bohr's epistemological lesson, the conviction that all our description of nature is dependent (...)
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  48. John Bowin (2010). Aristotle on the Unity of Change: Five Reductio Arguments in Physics Viii. Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):319-345.score: 18.0
    This paper examines five indirect proofs in Physics viii 8 and argues that four of them can be understood as attacks on the assumption, implicit in Zeno’s dichotomy paradox, that what we choose to call ‘one change’ is essentially arbitrary. In doing so, I will argue against the claim that one of these proofs is primarily intended to shore up Aristotle’s theory of change in the face of the dichotomy paradox by ‘refining’ the criteria for being ‘one change’, as (...)
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  49. Adonai S. Sant’Anna & Gabriel Guerrer (2007). Some Problems Concerning Language and Physics. Synthese 154 (3):467 - 484.score: 18.0
    We discuss three problems concerning the use of formal languages in theoretical physics: (i) the definability of time and spacetime in classical physical theories; (ii) how to cope with indistinguishable elementary particles in quantum mechanics without labeling them; and (iii) how to get a formal picture of quantum states jumping.
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  50. Katherine A. Brading & Elena Castellani (eds.) (2003). Symmetries in Physics: Philosophical Reflections. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Highlighting main issues and controversies, this book brings together current philosophical discussions of symmetry in physics to provide an introduction to the subject for physicists and philosophers. The contributors cover all the fundamental symmetries of modern physics, such as CPT and permutation symmetry, as well as discussing symmetry-breaking and general interpretational issues. Classic texts are followed by new review articles and shorter commentaries for each topic. Suitable for courses on the foundations of physics, philosophy of physics (...)
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