Search results for 'Physiognomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel Kirwan Wack (forthcoming). Wittgenstein's Critical Physiognomy. Nordic Wittgenstein Review.score: 18.0
    In saying that meaning is a physiognomy, Wittgenstein invokes a philosophical tradition of critical physiognomy, one that developed in opposition to a scientific physiognomy. The form of a critical physiognomic judgment is one of reasoning that is circular and dynamic, grasping intention, thoughts, and emotions in seeing the expressive movements of bodies in action. In identifying our capacities for meaning with our capacities for physiognomic perception, Wittgenstein develops an understanding of perception and meaning as oriented and structured (...)
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  2. Joseph Ziegler (2007). Philosophers and Physicians on the Scientific Validity of Latin Physiognomy, 1200-1500. Early Science and Medicine 12 (3):285-312.score: 15.0
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  3. Stephen Mulhall (1998). Species-Being, Teleology and Individuality Part III: Alienation and Self-Realisation the Physiognomy of the Human. Angelaki 3 (1):89 – 100.score: 12.0
    (1998). Species‐being, teleology and individuality part III: Alienation and self‐realisation the physiognomy of the human. Angelaki: Vol. 3, Impurity, authenticity and humanity, pp. 89-100.
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  4. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2011). The Physiognomy of Responsibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):381-417.score: 9.0
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  5. Paul Apostolidis (1998). Culture Industry or Social Physiognomy?: Adorno's Critique of Christian Right Radio. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5):53-84.score: 9.0
    A critical retrospective of 'The Psychological Technique of Martin Luther Thomas' Radio Addresses' sheds new light on an often underplayed tension in Adorno's thought concerning the capacity of mass culture to express resistance against domination. In 'Thomas' Adorno moved beyond denouncing mass culture as 'culture industry' by approach ing early Christian right radio in a manner consistent (initially) with his defense of the autonomous dimension of culture in general. At the same time, 'Thomas' accomplished groundwork for the culture industry theory, (...)
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  6. Axel Honneth (2005). A Physiognomy of the Capitalist Form of Life: A Sketch of Adorno's Social Theory. Constellations 12 (1):50-64.score: 9.0
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  7. Thomas Cloonan (2005). Face Value: The Phenomenology of Physiognomy. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 36 (2):219-246.score: 9.0
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  8. Daniel L. Rees (2013). Book Review: About Faces: Physiognomy in Nineteenth Century Britain. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 26 (1):151-154.score: 9.0
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  9. Richard J. Alapack (1971). The Physiognomy of the Mueller-Lyer Figure. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 2 (1):27-47.score: 9.0
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  10. Aubrey L. Glazer (2011). A New Physiognomy of Jewish Thinking: Critical Theory After Adorno as Applied to Jewish Thought. Continuum.score: 9.0
    A new critical approach to Jewish thinking and praxis, drawing upon key thinkers such as Adorno, Wittgenstein, Gdel, Heidegger and Celan.
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  11. Barbara Stafford (1972). 'Medusa' or the Physiognomy of the Earth: Humbert de Superville's Cosmological Aesthetics. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 35:308-338.score: 9.0
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  12. Laura Desmond (2011). The Pleasure is Mine: The Changing Subject of Erotic Science. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):15-39.score: 9.0
    Pleasure, the defining object of kāmaśāstric scholarship, is harmonious sensory experience, the product of a “good fit” between the self and the world. It comes about when one moves in a world of fitting sense objects, and one has made oneself fit to enter that world. The bulk of kāmaśāstric literature is devoted to developing, enhancing, and enacting specific bodily and sensory capabilities in order to maximize one’s ability to affect and be affected by the world. This article examines the (...)
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  13. C. Ellison (1990). Jean-Jacques Rousseau on the Physiognomy of the Modern City. History of European Ideas 12 (4):479-502.score: 9.0
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  14. Patience Moll (2009). Dialectical Catastrophe: Hegel's Allegory of Physiognomy and the Ethics of Survival. In Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.), The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 9.0
     
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  15. Irven M. Resnick (2002). Ps.-Albert the Great on the Physiognomy of Jesus and Mary. Mediaeval Studies 64 (1):217-240.score: 9.0
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  16. Martin Staum (1995). Physiognomy and Phrenology at the Paris Athenee. Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (3):443-462.score: 9.0
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  17. W. Jeffrey Tatum (2009). Physiognomy (S.) Swain (Ed.) Seeing the Face, Seeing the Soul. Polemon's Physiognomy From Classical Antiquity to Medieval Islam. With Contributions by George Boys-Stones, Jas Elsner, Antonella Ghersetti, Robert Hoyland and Ian Repath. Pp. X + 699, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £95. ISBN: 978-0-19-929153-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):424-.score: 9.0
  18. R. Steven Turner (2001). Book Review Of'Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture' by Lucy Hartley. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 1 (1):1-1.score: 9.0
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  19. Richard Twine (2002). Physiognomy, Phrenology and the Temporality of the Body. Body and Society 8 (1):67-88.score: 9.0
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  20. Hye-Joon Yoon (1998). Physiognomy of Capital in Charles Dickens: An Essay in Dialectical Criticism. International Scholars Publications.score: 9.0
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  21. Ian Maclean (2011). The Logic of Physiognomony in the Late Renaissance. Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):275-295.score: 6.0
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  22. Julian Friedland (2005). Wittgenstein and the Aesthetic Robot's Handicap. Philosophical Investigations 28 (2):177-192.score: 6.0
  23. Amedeo Giorgi (2011). The Importance of Securing the Psychologically Impalpable: The Vicissitudes of the Perception of Expressiveness. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 42 (1):26-45.score: 6.0
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  24. Daud Ali (2011). Padmaśrī's Nāgarasarvasva and the World of Medieval Kāmaśāstra. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):41-62.score: 6.0
    This essay focuses on a neglected and important text, the Nāgarasarvasva of Padmaśrī, as an index to the changing contours of kāmaśāstra in the early second millennium (1000-1500) CE. Focusing on a number of themes which linked Padmaśrī’s work with contemporary treatises, the essay argues that kāmaśāstra incorporated several new conceptions of the body and related para-technologies as well as elements of material and aesthetic culture which had become prominent in the cosmopolitan, courtly milieu. Rather than seeing this development as (...)
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  25. Giovanni Gurisatti (2010). Benjamin, Adorno E la “Fisiognomica”. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 3 (2).score: 6.0
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  26. Ewa Jakubowska (2010). Face: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.score: 6.0
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  27. David Wiggins (2012). Identity, Individuation and Substance. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):1-25.score: 3.0
    The paper takes off from the problem of finding a proper content for the relation of identity as it holds or fails to hold among ordinary things or substances. The necessary conditions of identity are familiar, the sufficient conditions less so. The search is for conditions at once better usable than the Leibnizian Identity of Indiscernibles (independently suspect) and strong enough to underwrite all the formal properties of the relation.It is contended that the key to this problem rests at the (...)
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  28. Conal Condren, Stephen Gaukroger & Ian Hunter (eds.) (2006). The Philosopher in Early Modern Europe: The Nature of a Contested Identity. Cambridge University Press.score: 3.0
    In this groundbreaking collection of essays the history of philosophy appears in a new light, not as reason's progressive discovery of its universal conditions, but as a series of unreconciled disputes over the proper way to conduct oneself as a philosopher. By shifting focus from the philosopher as proxy for the universal subject of reason to the philosopher as a special persona arising from rival forms of self-cultivation, philosophy is approached in terms of the social office and intellectual deportment of (...)
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  29. Arthur Schopenhauer (1891/1972). Religion: A Dialogue, and Other Essays. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.score: 3.0
    Religion: a dialogue.--A few words on pantheism.--On books and reading.--On physiognomy.--Psychological observations.--The Christian system.--The failure of philosophy.--The metaphysics of fine art.
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  30. Hillel D. Braude (2012). Intuition in Medicine: A Philosophical Defense of Clinical Reasoning. The University of Chicago Press.score: 3.0
    Intuition in medical and moral reasoning -- Moral intuitionism -- The place of Aristotelian phronesis in clinical reasoning -- Aristotle's practical syllogism: accounting for the individual through a theory of action and cognition -- Individual and statistical physiognomy: the art and science of making the invisible visible -- Clinical intuition versus statistical reasoning -- Contingency and correlation: the significance of modeling clinical reasoning on statistics -- Abduction: the intuitive support of clinical induction -- Conclusion: medical ethics beyond ontology.
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  31. Eran Guter (2004). Wittgenstein on Musical Experience and Knowledge. In J. C. Marek & E. M. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis, Contributions to the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 3.0
    Wittgenstein’s thinking on music is intimately linked to core issues in his work on the philosophy of psychology. I argue that inasmuch musical experience exemplifies the kind of grammatical complexity that is indigenous to aspect perception and, in general, to concepts that are based on physiognomy, it is rendered by Wittgenstein as a form of knowledge, namely, knowledge of mankind.
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  32. Joachim Schulte (forthcoming). Did Wittgenstein Write on Shakespeare? Nordic Wittgenstein Review.score: 3.0
    It is often claimed that certain remarks by Wittgenstein reveal him to have been an unsympathetic reader of Shakespeare and an unappreciative judge of the latter’s achievements. In the present paper, I attempt to show that this sort of observation is not only wrong but due to an inadequate perspective. An examination of the relevant remarks may bring to light a number of more or less interesting principles of evaluation, or aesthetic maxims and appraisals, but these do not say much (...)
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  33. Daniel Barthélémy (1991). Levels of Organization and Repetition Phenomena in Seed Plants. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4).score: 3.0
    Each plant can be recognized by its general shape. Nevertheless, this physiognomy is the result of a very precise structure that expresses the existence of a strong organization. The architecture of a plant depends on the nature and relative arrangement of each of its parts; it is at any given time the result of an equilibrium between endogenous growth processes and the constraints exerted by the environment. Architectural studies have been carried out for some twenty years and have led (...)
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  34. Robert S. Williams Jr (1984). Ability, Dis-Ability and Rehabilitation: A Phenomenological Description. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):93-112.score: 3.0
    "Uprightness" was termed the "leitmotiv in the formation of the human organism" by Erwin Straus (1966, p. 139). He felt that without it the human being was certainly doomed to die. Yet, what happens with those who are deprived of their "uprightness" in either the literal or moral sense (as in "not to stoop to anything"), through becoming Dis-abled? Getting up, rising in opposition to the "other" (Allon) implies a moral dimension in the case of human Dis-ability which is tied (...)
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  35. Hampton L. Carson (1993). Human Genetic Diversity, a Critical Resource for Man's Future. Biology and Philosophy 8 (1):33-45.score: 3.0
    The human gene pool displays exuberant genetic variation; this is normal for a sexual species. Even small isolated populations contain a large percentage of the total variability, emphasizing the basic genetic unity of our species. As modern man spread across the world from its African source, the genetic basis for man''s unique mental acuity was retained everywhere. Nevertheless, some geographical genetic variation such as skin color, stature and physiognomy was established. These changes were biologically relatively insignificant. Most of the (...)
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  36. Joel B. Hagen (1986). Ecologists and Taxonomists: Divergent Traditions in Twentieth-Century Plant Geography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):197 - 214.score: 3.0
    The distinction between taxonomic plant geography and ecological plant geography was never absolute: it would be historically inaccurate to portray them as totally divergent. Taxonomists occasionally borrowed ecological concepts, and ecologists never completely repudiated taxonomy. Indeed, some botanists pursued the two types of geographic study. The American taxonomist Henry Allan Gleason (1882–1975), for one, made noteworthy contributions to both. Most of Gleason's research appeared in short articles, however. He never published a major synthetic work comparable in scope or influence to (...)
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  37. Georg Henrik Von Wright (forthcoming). Wittgenstein and the Twentieth Century. Acta Philosophica Fennica.score: 3.0
    A feature of the spiritual physiognomy of the twentieth century has been belief in "progress" and in the beneficial influence on human wellbeing of science and technology. Wittgenstein never shares these optimistic sentiments. Towards the end of his life he wrote that there is nothing absurd in the belief that the age of science and technology is "the beginning of the end of humanity" and that mankind steering its course towards the future relying on scientific rationality "is falling into (...)
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  38. Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.) (2009). The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 3.0
    Machine generated contents note: List of illustrations * Notes On Contributors * Introduction: B.Biebuyck, G.Buelens, O.de Graef, D.Hoens, S.Jttkandt * Who or What Decides: For Derrida: A Catastrophic Theory of Decision--J.Hillis Miller * Catastrophic Narratives and Why the Catastrophe to Catastrophe Might Have Already Happened--E.Vogt * Breath of Relief: Sloterdijk and the Politics of the Intimate--S.van Tuinen * Man is a swarm animal--J.Clemens * Notes on the Bird War: Biopolitics of the Visible (in the Era of Climate Change)--T.Cohen * Dialectical (...)
     
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  39. Brian M. Hughes (2011). Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology. Pearson.score: 3.0
    Explaining people : theoretical psychology throughout the ages -- Ways of knowing : the scientific method and its alternatives -- From philosophy to laboratory : the arrival of empirical psychology -- The evolution of measurement : from physiognomy to psychometrics -- The behaviourist revolution : actions as data -- The cognitive revolution : the metaphor of computation -- Neuroscience and genetics : 21st century reductionism? -- Can psychology be scientific? -- Subjectivist approaches to psychology -- The problem of consciousness (...)
     
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  40. Brian M. Hughes (2011). Psychology Express: Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology. Pearson.score: 3.0
    Explaining people : theoretical psychology throughout the ages -- Ways of knowing : the scientific method and its alternatives -- From philosophy to laboratory : the arrival of empirical psychology -- The evolution of measurement : from physiognomy to psychometrics -- The behaviourist revolution : actions as data -- The cognitive revolution : the metaphor of computation -- Neuroscience and genetics : 21st century reductionism? -- Can psychology be scientific? -- Subjectivist approaches to psychology -- The problem of consciousness (...)
     
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  41. Mary Kemperink (2011). Physiognomies ofGenius: Norm and Deviation in Nineteenth-Century Literary and Scientific Writings. In Brian Hurwitz & Paola Spinozzi (eds.), Discourses and Narrations in the Biosciences. V&R Unipress. 8--117.score: 3.0
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  42. Antonio Somaini (2006). Il volto delle cose.«Physiognomie»,«Stimmung» e «Atmosphäre» nella teoria del cinema di Béla Balãzs. Rivista di Estetica 46 (33):143-162.score: 3.0
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  43. Sarah R. Cohen (2010). Searching the Animal Psyche with Charles Le Brun. Annals of Science 67 (3):353-382.score: 1.0
    Summary Around 1670 the French court painter and Academician Charles Le Brun produced a series of drawings featuring naturalistic animal heads, as well as imaginary heads in which he refashioned various nonhuman animal species to make humanoid physiognomies. What were the purpose and significance of these unusual works? I argue that they show Le Brun's interest in what we today would call animal psychology: focusing upon the sensory organs and their connections with the animal's brain, Le Brun studied his animals (...)
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