Search results for 'Physiognomy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Joseph Ziegler (2007). Philosophers and Physicians on the Scientific Validity of Latin Physiognomy, 1200-1500. Early Science and Medicine 12 (3):285-312.
    The article surveys and contextualizes the main arguments among philosophers and academic physicians surrounding the status of physiognomy as a valid science from the thirteenth to the early sixteenth centuries. It suggests that despite constant doubts, learned Latin physiognomy in the later Middle Ages was recognized by natural philosophers and academic physicians as a body of knowledge rooted in a sound theoretical basis. Physiognomy was characterized by stability and certainty. As a demonstrative science it was expected to (...)
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  2.  11
    Daniel Kirwan Wack (2014). Wittgenstein's Critical Physiognomy. Nordic Wittgenstein Review 3 (1):113-137.
    In saying that meaning is a physiognomy, Wittgenstein invokes a philosophical tradition of critical physiognomy, one that developed in opposition to a scientific physiognomy. The form of a critical physiognomic judgment is one of reasoning that is circular and dynamic, grasping intention, thoughts, and emotions in seeing the expressive movements of bodies in action. In identifying our capacities for meaning with our capacities for physiognomic perception, Wittgenstein develops an understanding of perception and meaning as oriented and structured (...)
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  3.  33
    Stephen Mulhall (1998). Species-Being, Teleology and Individuality Part III: Alienation and Self-Realisation the Physiognomy of the Human. Angelaki 3 (1):89 – 100.
    (1998). Species‐being, teleology and individuality part III: Alienation and self‐realisation the physiognomy of the human. Angelaki: Vol. 3, Impurity, authenticity and humanity, pp. 89-100.
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  4.  10
    Thomas Cloonan (2005). Face Value: The Phenomenology of Physiognomy. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 36 (2):219-246.
    The concern of this article is to establish the difference between physiognomy and expression as it may be understood phenomenologically. The work of Merleau-Ponty founds the phenomenological appreciation of physiognomy, and Gestalt psychological studies on perceptual organization elaborate the specifics of physiognomic structure despite the naturalist assumptions of that school of psychology. Physiognomy is the organized structural specification of expression in the phenomenon that presents itself. This view is an alternative to conventional topical but nonthematic considerations on (...)
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  5. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2011). The Physiognomy of Responsibility. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):381-417.
    Our aim in this paper is to put the concept of moral responsibility under a microscope. At the lowest level of magnification, it appears unified. But Gary Watson has taught us that if we zoom in, we will find that moral responsibility has two faces: attributability and accountability. Or, to describe the two faces in different terms, there is a difference between being responsible and holding responsible. It is one thing to talk about the connection the agent has with her (...)
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  6. Barbara Stafford (1972). 'Medusa' or the Physiognomy of the Earth: Humbert de Superville's Cosmological Aesthetics. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 35:308-338.
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  7.  71
    Daniel L. Rees (2013). Book Review: About Faces: Physiognomy in Nineteenth Century Britain. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 26 (1):151-154.
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  8.  9
    Richard Twine (2002). Physiognomy, Phrenology and the Temporality of the Body. Body and Society 8 (1):67-88.
  9.  5
    Irven M. Resnick (2002). Ps.-Albert the Great on the Physiognomy of Jesus and Mary. Mediaeval Studies 64 (1):217-240.
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  10.  9
    W. Jeffrey Tatum (2009). Physiognomy (S.) Swain (Ed.) Seeing the Face, Seeing the Soul. Polemon's Physiognomy From Classical Antiquity to Medieval Islam. With Contributions by George Boys-Stones, Jas Elsner, Antonella Ghersetti, Robert Hoyland and Ian Repath. Pp. X + 699, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £95. ISBN: 978-0-19-929153-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):424-.
  11.  18
    Axel Honneth (2005). A Physiognomy of the Capitalist Form of Life: A Sketch of Adorno's Social Theory. Constellations 12 (1):50-64.
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  12.  14
    Paul Apostolidis (1998). Culture Industry or Social Physiognomy?: Adorno's Critique of Christian Right Radio. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5):53-84.
    A critical retrospective of 'The Psychological Technique of Martin Luther Thomas' Radio Addresses' sheds new light on an often underplayed tension in Adorno's thought concerning the capacity of mass culture to express resistance against domination. In 'Thomas' Adorno moved beyond denouncing mass culture as 'culture industry' by approach ing early Christian right radio in a manner consistent (initially) with his defense of the autonomous dimension of culture in general. At the same time, 'Thomas' accomplished groundwork for the culture industry theory, (...)
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  13.  2
    Martín Ríos López (2014). Homme de Lettres: Guidelines for a physiognomy of Walter Benjamin. Alpha (Osorno) 38:267-280.
    Luego de señalar algunos momentos específicos en la obra de Arendt, en los que la cuestión de la sentimentalidad aparece, sobre todo de manera crítica, nos centraremos en un aspecto específico de esta, de especial interés para nosotros: el lugar de la indignación a la hora de narrar, contar, construir la historia de una comunidad y a la hora de abrir e instaurar el espacio público, caracterizado por Arendt como el espacio de aparición más elemental, donde los otros aparecen ante (...)
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  14.  2
    Moshe Barasch (1975). Character and Physiognomy: Bocchi on Donatello's St. George: A Renaissance Text on Expression in Art. Journal of the History of Ideas 36 (3):413.
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  15.  9
    Richard J. Alapack (1971). The Physiognomy of the Mueller-Lyer Figure. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 2 (1):27-47.
    The thematic survey of traditional literature uncovered a pressing need to study the M-L figure as a phenomenon in its own right. A design was constructed intending to evoke the figure's full phenomenal appearance. Instead of framing a highly determinate structure wherein a specific question is posed, E presented the figure to naive Ss, simply asking them to describe it. The purpose was to ascertain what naive Ss would perceive if not encumbered by a prior set. In addition, five experiential (...)
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  16.  3
    C. Ellison (1990). Jean-Jacques Rousseau on the Physiognomy of the Modern City. History of European Ideas 12 (4):479-502.
    The author acknowledges the generous support of the University of Cincinnati Research Council for this research and the assistance of many colleagues whose commentaries have proved so helpful.
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  17. John Graham (1961). Lavater's "Physiognomy" in England. Journal of the History of Ideas 22 (4):561.
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  18.  2
    B. Babich (2014). Adorno's Radio Phenomenology: Technical Reproduction, Physiognomy and Music. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (10):957-996.
    Adorno’s phenomenological study of radio offers a sociology of music in a political and cultural context. Situating that phenomenology in the context of Adorno’s philosophical background and the world political circumstances of Adorno’s collaboration with Paul Lazarsfeld on the Princeton Radio Project, illuminates both Adorno’s Current of Music and the Dialectic of Enlightenment with Max Horkheimer and the ‘Culture Industry’. Together with an analysis of popular music in social practice/culture, this article also explores Adorno’s spatial reflections on Paul Bekker’s notion (...)
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  19.  2
    Martin Staum (1995). Physiognomy and Phrenology at the Paris Athenee. Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (3):443-462.
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  20.  5
    Aubrey L. Glazer (2011). A New Physiognomy of Jewish Thinking: Critical Theory After Adorno as Applied to Jewish Thought. Continuum.
    A new critical approach to Jewish thinking and praxis, drawing upon key thinkers such as Adorno, Wittgenstein, Gdel, Heidegger and Celan.
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  21. Cesare Lombroso (1890). Anarchists, The Physiognomy of The. The Monist 1:336.
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  22. Paolo Mantegazza (1890). Physiognomy and Expression. The Monist 1:447.
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  23. Patience Moll (2009). Dialectical Catastrophe: Hegel's Allegory of Physiognomy and the Ethics of Survival. In Dominiek Hoens, Sigi Jottkandt & Gert Buelens (eds.), The Catastrophic Imperative: Subjectivity, Time and Memory in Contemporary Thought. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  24. Robert I. O'Desky & Marion J. Ball (1982). The Physiognomy of Computer Systems in Pathology Departments. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 25 (3):454-462.
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  25. R. Steven Turner (2001). Book Review Of'Physiognomy and the Meaning of Expression in Nineteenth-Century Culture' by Lucy Hartley. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 1 (1):1-1.
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  26. H. G. Xunzi (2015). Chapter 5: Against Physiognomy. In Xunzi: The Complete Text. Princeton University Press 32-39.
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  27. Hye-Joon Yoon (1998). Physiognomy of Capital in Charles Dickens: An Essay in Dialectical Criticism. International Scholars Publications.
    A materialist approach to the fictions of Charles Dickens based on a reading-in of the historical background, creative application of Walter Benjamin's methodology, as well as a re-reading the philological core of the minor works.
     
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  28.  23
    Ian Maclean (2011). The Logic of Physiognomony in the Late Renaissance. Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):275-295.
    This article studies the advances made in the logic of Renaissance physiognomy from the state of the subject in antiquity and the Middle Ages. The properties and accidents of the human body are investigated in the context of the signs selected by physiognomers, whether univocal or in syndromes, strong or weak in character, negative or positive, consistent with each other or contradictory. When these signs are translated into propositions, the construction of argument which flows from them is shown to (...)
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  29.  7
    Laura Desmond (2011). The Pleasure is Mine: The Changing Subject of Erotic Science. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):15-39.
    Pleasure, the defining object of kāmaśāstric scholarship, is harmonious sensory experience, the product of a “good fit” between the self and the world. It comes about when one moves in a world of fitting sense objects, and one has made oneself fit to enter that world. The bulk of kāmaśāstric literature is devoted to developing, enhancing, and enacting specific bodily and sensory capabilities in order to maximize one’s ability to affect and be affected by the world. This article examines the (...)
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  30. Angela Coventry & Emilio Mazza (2016). Humean Eyes ('One Particular Shade of Blue'). Cogent Arts and Humanities 3 (1).
    Why do Humean eyes matter? The subject of David Hume’s eyes and face leads us into some unexpected curiosities connected with events in his life and written works. We outline the scholars’ propensity to describe the face of their favourite philosopher and spread upon it their personal reading of his life and writings. We ask questions about portraits, their resemblance to the original as a standard of beauty. We survey eighteenth-century physiognomy, and the humourous paradox of the “fat philosopher,” (...)
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  31.  8
    Amedeo Giorgi (2011). The Importance of Securing the Psychologically Impalpable: The Vicissitudes of the Perception of Expressiveness. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 42 (1):26-45.
    Historically, when psychology broke away from a philosophical mode of scholarship it strove to become a natural science. This meant that it largely imitated the concepts and practices of the natural sciences which included the use of abstract terms to designate many of its phenomena with the consequence that psychology is often more abstract and generic than it ought to be. Husserl has emphasized the role of the life-world as the ultimate basis of all knowledge and a serious consideration of (...)
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  32.  12
    Daud Ali (2011). Padmaśrī's Nāgarasarvasva and the World of Medieval Kāmaśāstra. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):41-62.
    This essay focuses on a neglected and important text, the Nāgarasarvasva of Padmaśrī, as an index to the changing contours of kāmaśāstra in the early second millennium (1000-1500) CE. Focusing on a number of themes which linked Padmaśrī’s work with contemporary treatises, the essay argues that kāmaśāstra incorporated several new conceptions of the body and related para-technologies as well as elements of material and aesthetic culture which had become prominent in the cosmopolitan, courtly milieu. Rather than seeing this development as (...)
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  33.  23
    Julian Friedland (2005). Wittgenstein and the Aesthetic Robot's Handicap. Philosophical Investigations 28 (2):177-192.
  34.  6
    Giovanni Gurisatti (2010). Benjamin, Adorno E la “Fisiognomica”. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 3 (2).
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  35. Ewa Jakubowska (2010). Face: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego.
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  36.  15
    Hillel D. Braude (2012). Intuition in Medicine: A Philosophical Defense of Clinical Reasoning. The University of Chicago Press.
    Intuition in medical and moral reasoning -- Moral intuitionism -- The place of Aristotelian phronesis in clinical reasoning -- Aristotle's practical syllogism: accounting for the individual through a theory of action and cognition -- Individual and statistical physiognomy: the art and science of making the invisible visible -- Clinical intuition versus statistical reasoning -- Contingency and correlation: the significance of modeling clinical reasoning on statistics -- Abduction: the intuitive support of clinical induction -- Conclusion: medical ethics beyond ontology.
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  37. Arthur C. Danto (2013). What Art Is. Yale University Press.
    What is it to be a work of art? Renowned author and critic Arthur C. Danto addresses this fundamental, complex question. Part philosophical monograph and part memoiristic meditation, _What Art Is _challenges the popular interpretation that art is an indefinable concept, instead bringing to light the properties that constitute universal meaning. Danto argues that despite varied approaches, a work of art is always defined by two essential criteria: meaning and embodiment, as well as one additional criterion contributed by the viewer: (...)
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  38. David Wiggins (2012). Identity, Individuation and Substance. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):1-25.
    The paper takes off from the problem of finding a proper content for the relation of identity as it holds or fails to hold among ordinary things or substances. The necessary conditions of identity are familiar, the sufficient conditions less so. The search is for conditions at once better usable than the Leibnizian Identity of Indiscernibles (independently suspect) and strong enough to underwrite all the formal properties of the relation.It is contended that the key to this problem rests at the (...)
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  39.  11
    Georg Henrik Von Wright (forthcoming). Wittgenstein and the Twentieth Century. Acta Philosophica Fennica.
    A feature of the spiritual physiognomy of the twentieth century has been belief in "progress" and in the beneficial influence on human wellbeing of science and technology. Wittgenstein never shares these optimistic sentiments. Towards the end of his life he wrote that there is nothing absurd in the belief that the age of science and technology is "the beginning of the end of humanity" and that mankind steering its course towards the future relying on scientific rationality "is falling into (...)
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  40. Jürgen Habermas (2012). Philosophical Political Profiles. Polity.
    "At the hands of a minor talent, profiles are often flat, two-dimensional outlines of a thinker’s intellectual physiognomy. At the hands of a master like Jürgen Habermas, they can become something far more substantial and profound. With astonishing economy, Habermas sketches his impressions of the giants of recent German thought, several of whom were his personal mentors. For those of his readers accustomed to the demandingly abstract level of his theoretical work, the results will prove a welcome surprise. Without (...)
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  41.  18
    David Wiggins (2012). Identity, Individuation and Substance. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):1-25.
    The paper takes off from the problem of finding a proper content for the relation of identity as it holds or fails to hold among ordinary things or substances. The necessary conditions of identity are familiar, the sufficient conditions less so. The search is for conditions at once better usable than the Leibnizian Identity of Indiscernibles (independently suspect) and strong enough to underwrite all the formal properties of the relation. -/- It is contended that the key to this problem rests (...)
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  42.  34
    Eran Guter (2004). Wittgenstein on Musical Experience and Knowledge. In J. C. Marek & E. M. Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis, Contributions to the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society
    Wittgenstein’s thinking on music is intimately linked to core issues in his work on the philosophy of psychology. I argue that inasmuch musical experience exemplifies the kind of grammatical complexity that is indigenous to aspect perception and, in general, to concepts that are based on physiognomy, it is rendered by Wittgenstein as a form of knowledge, namely, knowledge of mankind.
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  43.  6
    Joel B. Hagen (1986). Ecologists and Taxonomists: Divergent Traditions in Twentieth-Century Plant Geography. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 19 (2):197 - 214.
    The distinction between taxonomic plant geography and ecological plant geography was never absolute: it would be historically inaccurate to portray them as totally divergent. Taxonomists occasionally borrowed ecological concepts, and ecologists never completely repudiated taxonomy. Indeed, some botanists pursued the two types of geographic study. The American taxonomist Henry Allan Gleason (1882–1975), for one, made noteworthy contributions to both. Most of Gleason's research appeared in short articles, however. He never published a major synthetic work comparable in scope or influence to (...)
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  44.  9
    Robert S. Williams Jr (1984). Ability, Dis-Ability and Rehabilitation: A Phenomenological Description. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):93-112.
    "Uprightness" was termed the "leitmotiv in the formation of the human organism" by Erwin Straus (1966, p. 139). He felt that without it the human being was certainly doomed to die. Yet, what happens with those who are deprived of their "uprightness" in either the literal or moral sense (as in "not to stoop to anything"), through becoming Dis-abled? Getting up, rising in opposition to the "other" (Allon) implies a moral dimension in the case of human Dis-ability which is tied (...)
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  45.  11
    Joachim Schulte (forthcoming). Did Wittgenstein Write on Shakespeare? Nordic Wittgenstein Review.
    It is often claimed that certain remarks by Wittgenstein reveal him to have been an unsympathetic reader of Shakespeare and an unappreciative judge of the latter’s achievements. In the present paper, I attempt to show that this sort of observation is not only wrong but due to an inadequate perspective. An examination of the relevant remarks may bring to light a number of more or less interesting principles of evaluation, or aesthetic maxims and appraisals, but these do not say much (...)
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  46.  18
    George F. Franko (1995). Incest and Ridicule in the Poenulus of Plautus. Classical Quarterly 45 (01):250-.
    Readers of Plautus’ Poenulus are struck by the generally ‘sympathetic’ portrayal of the title character Hanno, a portrayal somewhat surprising to us since the play was produced shortly after the Second Punic War.1 Contrary to what we might expect, Hanno the Carthaginian is neither villain nor scapegoat, and he even exhibits the Roman virtue of pietas.2 However, Hanno's portrayal is not wholly positive, for Plautus delineates his character principally by endowing him with the negative stereotypes of Punic physiognomy, dress, (...)
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  47.  13
    Daniel Barthélémy (1991). Levels of Organization and Repetition Phenomena in Seed Plants. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (3-4):309-323.
    Each plant can be recognized by its general shape. Nevertheless, this physiognomy is the result of a very precise structure that expresses the existence of a strong organization. The architecture of a plant depends on the nature and relative arrangement of each of its parts; it is at any given time the result of an equilibrium between endogenous growth processes and the constraints exerted by the environment. Architectural studies have been carried out for some twenty years and have led (...)
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  48.  8
    Robert Schweitzer (1996). A Phenomenological Study of Dream Interpretation Among the Xhosa-Speaking People in Rural South Africa. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 27 (1):72-96.
    Psychologists investigating dreams in non-Western cultures have generally not considered the meanings of dreams within the unique meaning-structure of the person in his or her societal context. The study was concerned with explicating the indigenous system of dream interpretation of the Xhosa-speaking people, as revealed by acknowledged dream experts, and elaborating upon the life-world of the participants. Fifty dreams and their interpretations were collected from participants, who were traditional healers and their clients. A phenomenological methodology was adopted in explicating the (...)
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  49.  6
    Hampton L. Carson (1993). Human Genetic Diversity, a Critical Resource for Man's Future. Biology and Philosophy 8 (1):33-45.
    The human gene pool displays exuberant genetic variation; this is normal for a sexual species. Even small isolated populations contain a large percentage of the total variability, emphasizing the basic genetic unity of our species. As modern man spread across the world from its African source, the genetic basis for man''s unique mental acuity was retained everywhere. Nevertheless, some geographical genetic variation such as skin color, stature and physiognomy was established. These changes were biologically relatively insignificant. Most of the (...)
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  50.  2
    Sandra Viviana Palermo (2011). El hilo sutil de la rememoración. Felicidad y redención histórica en la obra de Walter Benjamin. Isegoría 45:575-594.
    El texto presenta un análisis de la estructura del tiempo mesiánico que Benjamin intenta pensar desde el punto de vista de su indisoluble conexión con los conceptos de felicidad y redención. El recorrido conceptual va desde los escritos de juventud, en los que la constelación felicidad-redención adquiere una fisonomía definida -conjugándose con una crítica elegante y puntual de la modernidad- a las tesis Sobre el concepto de historia, en las cuales tal constelación se entrelaza con la figura del Eingedenken, que (...)
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