Search results for 'Physiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eugen Fischer (2001). Unfair to Physiology. Acta Analytica 16 (26):135-155.score: 24.0
    The paper seeks to refute the idea that physiology can explain at best an organism’s behaviour, outward and inner, but not the conscious experiences that accompany that behaviour. To do so, the paper clarifies the idea by confrontation with an actual example of psychophysical explanation of perceptual experience. This reveals that the idea relies on a prejudice about physiological practice. Then the paper explores some peculiar ways in which this prejudice may survive its refutation. This is to bring out (...)
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  2. Cheryl A. Logan (2002). Before There Were Standards: The Role of Test Animals in the Production of Empirical Generality in Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):329 - 363.score: 24.0
    After 1900, the selective breeding of a few standard animals for research in the life sciences changed the way science was done. Among the pervasive changes was a transformation in scientists' assumptions about relationship between diversity and generality. Examination of the contents of two prominent physiology journals between 1885 and 1900, reveals that scientists used a diverse array of organisms in empirical research. Experimental physiologists gave many reasons for the choice of test animals, some practical and others truly (...)
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  3. Henning Schmidgen (2004). Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception (Anschauung) in Late-19th-Century Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477 - 513.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak (1828-1873) as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception (unmittelbare Anschauung)." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed (...)
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  4. Jorge Marques da Silva & Elena Casetta (forthcoming). The Evolutionary Stages of Plant Physiology and a Plea for Transdisciplinarity. Axiomathes:1-11.score: 24.0
    In this paper, the need of increasing transdisciplinarity research is advocated. After having set out some peculiarity of transdisciplinarity compared with related concepts such as multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, four evolutionary stages of scientific disciplines, based on a model recently proposed (Shneider in Trends Biochem Sci 34:217–223, 2009) are presented. This model is then applied to the case of Plant Physiology in order to attempt an evaluation of the potential for transdisciplinary engagement of the discipline, and each of the four (...)
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  5. A. Berthoz (2008). The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining sensory data before deciding how (...)
     
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  6. Charles A. Campbell (1953). Philosophy and Brain Physiology. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (January):51-56.score: 21.0
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  7. P. L. McKee (1971). Perception and Physiology. Mind 80 (October):594-596.score: 21.0
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  8. Tamás Demeter (2012). The Anatomy and Physiology of Mind: Hume's Vitalistic Account. In H. F. J. Horstmanshoff, H. King & C. Zittel (eds.), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Brill.score: 21.0
    In this paper I challenge the widely held view which associates Hume’s philosophy with mechanical philosophies of nature and particularly with Newton. This view presents Hume’s account of the human mind as passive receiver of impressions which bring into motion, from the outside, a mental machinery whose functioning is described in terms of mechanical causal principles. Instead, I propose an interpretation which suggests that for Hume the human mind is composed of faculties that can be characterized by their active contribution (...)
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  9. Eduard Glas (1979). Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations. Delft University Press.score: 21.0
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
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  10. Scott Edgar (forthcoming). The Physiology of the Sense Organs and Early Neo-Kantian Conceptions of Objectivity: Helmholtz, Lange, Liebmann. In Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.), Objectivity in Science: Approaches to Historical Epistemology. Boston Studies in Philosophy and History of Science. Springer.score: 21.0
    The physiologist Johannes Müller’s doctrine of specific nerve energies had a decisive influence on neo-Kantian conceptions of the objectivity of knowledge in the 1850s - 1870s. In the first half of the nineteenth century, Müller amassed a body of experimental evidence to support his doctrine, according to which the character of our sensations is determined by the structures of our own sensory nerves, and not by the external objects that cause the sensations. Neo-Kantians such as Hermann von Helmholtz, F.A. Lange, (...)
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  11. Frank Stahnisch (2012). Medicine, Life and Function: Experimental Strategies and Medical Modernity at the Intersection of Pathology and Physiology. Project Verlag.score: 21.0
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  12. Gary Hatfield (1992). Descartes' Physiology and its Relation to His Psychology. In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press. 335--370.score: 21.0
     
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  13. F. J. Mullin, N. Kleitman & N. R. Cooperman (1937). Studies on the Physiology of Sleep Changes in Irritability to Auditory Stimuli During Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (1):88.score: 21.0
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  14. A. Cunningham (2002). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - I: Old Physiology-the Pen. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):631-665.score: 18.0
    It is argued that the disciplinary identity of anatomy and physiology before 1800 are unknown to us due to the subsequent creation, success and historiographical dominance of a different discipline-experimental physiology. The first of these two papers deals with the identity of physiology from its revival in the 1530s, and demonstrates that it was a theoretical, not an experimental, discipline, achieved with the mind and the pen, not the hand and the knife. The physiological work of Jean (...)
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  15. Wim J. M. Dekkers (1995). F.J.J. Buytendijk's Concept of an Anthropological Physiology. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).score: 18.0
    In his concept of an anthropological physiology, F.J.J. Buytendijk has tried to lay down the theoretical and scientific foundations for an anthropologically-oriented medicine. The aim of anthropological physiology is to demonstrate, empirically, what being specifically human is in the most elementary physiological functions. This article contains a sketch of Buytendijk''s life and work, an overview of his philosophical-anthropological presuppositions, an outline of his idea of an anthropological physiology and medicine, and a discussion of some episternological and methodological (...)
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  16. Lukas Soderstrom (2009). Nietzsche as a Reader of Wilhelm Roux, or the Physiology of History. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 13 (2):55-67.score: 18.0
    This paper explores one of the main sources of Nietzsche’s knowledge of physiology and considers its relevance for the philosophical study of history. Beginning in 1881, Nietzsche read Der Kampf der Theile im Organismus by Wilhelm Roux, which exposed him to a dysteleological account of organic development emphasising the excitative, assimilative and auto-regulative processes of the body. These processes mediate the effects of natural selection. His reading contributed to a physiological understanding of history that borrowed Roux’s description of physiological (...)
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  17. Tom Sparrow (2010). A Physiology of Encounters: Spinoza, Nietzsche, and Strange Alliances. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):165-186.score: 18.0
    The body is central to the philosophies of Spinoza and Nietzsche. Both thinkers are concerned with the composition of the body, its potential relations with other bodies, and the modifications which a body can undergo. Gilles Deleuze has contributed significantly to the relatively sparse literature which draws out the affinities between Spinoza and Nietzsche. Deleuze’s reconceptualization of the field of ethology enables us to bring Spinoza and Nietzsche together as ethologists of the body and to elaborate their common, physiological perspective (...)
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  18. Mark Germine (1997). The Physiology of Collective Consciousness. World Futures 48 (1):57-104.score: 18.0
    (1997). The physiology of collective consciousness. World Futures: Vol. 48, The Concept of Collective Consiousness: Research Perspectives, pp. 57-104.
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  19. Barbara E. Jones (2000). The Interpretation of Physiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):955-956.score: 18.0
    Not at all self-evident, the so-called isomorphisms between the phenomenology and physiology of dreams have been interpreted by Hobson et al. in an arbitrary manner to state that dreams are stimulated by chaotic brainstem stimulation (an assumption also adopted by Vertes & Eastman). I argue that this stimulation is not chaotic at all; nor does it occur in the absence of control from the cerebral cortex, which contributes complexity to brainstem activity as well as meaningful information worth consolidating in (...)
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  20. [deleted]Ariane Bazan & Sandrine Detandt (2013). On the Physiology of Jouissance: Interpreting the Mesolimbic Dopaminergic Reward Functions From a Psychoanalytic Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Jouissance is a Lacanian concept, infamous for being impervious to understanding and which expresses the paradoxical satisfaction that a subject may derive from his symptom. On the basis of Freud’s “experience of satisfaction” we have proposed a first working definition of jouissance as the (benefit gained from) the motor tension underlying the action which was [once] adequate in bringing relief to the drive and, on the basis of their striking reciprocal resonances, we have proposed that central dopaminergic systems could embody (...)
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  21. H. M. Hubey (1997). Logic, Physics, Physiology, and Topology of Color. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):191-194.score: 18.0
    This commentary starts with a simplified Cartesian vector space of the tristimulus theory of color. This vector space is then further simplified so that bitstrings are used to represent the vector space. The Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) diagram is shown to follow directly and simply from this vector space. The Berlin & Kay results are shown to agree quite well with the vector space and the two-dimensional version of it, especially if the dimensions are normalized to take into account (...)
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  22. A. Cunningham (2003). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - II: Old Anatomy-the Sword. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):51-76.score: 18.0
    Following the exploration of the disciplinary identity of physiology before 1800 in the previous paper of this pair, the present paper seeks to recover the complementary identity of the discipline of anatomy before 1800. The manual, artisanal character of anatomy is explored via some of its practitioners, with special attention being given to William Harvey and Albrecht von Haller. Attention is particularly drawn to the important role of experiment in anatomical research and practice-which has been misread by historians as (...)
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  23. Edgar Landgraf (2014). Circling the Archimedean Viewpoint: Observations of Physiology in Nietzsche and Luhmann. Substance 43 (3):88-106.score: 18.0
    The question of how our conception of the world could differ so widely from the disclosed nature of the world will with perfect equanimity be relinquished to the physiology and history of the evolution of organisms and concepts.In an interview conducted by the Italian literary journal Alfabeta in April of 1987,1 Niklas Luhmann was asked if sociology, in particular its systems-theoretical variant, could replace the privileged position that art, religion, philosophy, and politics had lost, and provide an Archimedean point (...)
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  24. E. Thomson (2001). Physiology, Hygiene and the Entry of Women to the Medical Profession in Edinburgh C. 1869-C. 1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (1):105-126.score: 18.0
    Academic physiology, as it was taught by John Hughes Bennett during the 1870s, involved an understanding of the functions of the human body and the physical laws which governed those functions. This knowledge was perceived to be directly relevant and applicable to clinical practice in terms of maintaining bodily hygiene and human health. The first generation of medical women received their physiological education at Edinburgh University under Bennett, who emphasised the importance of physiology for women due to its (...)
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  25. Stella V. F. Butler (1988). Centers and Peripheries: The Development of British Physiology, 1870-1914. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 21 (3):473 - 500.score: 18.0
    By 1910 the Cambridge University physiology department had become the kernel of British physiology. Between 1909 and 1914 an astonishing number of young and talented scientists passed through the laboratory. The University College department was also a stimulating place of study under the dynamic leadership of Ernest Starling.I have argued that the reasons for this metropolitan axis within British physiology lie with the social structure of late-Victorian and Edwardian higher education. Cambridge, Oxford, and University College London were (...)
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  26. John Protevi, Political Physiology in High School: Columbine and After.score: 18.0
    In this paper I investigate the mechanics of killing, brining together neuroscience, military history, and the work of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari. Investigating the Columbine killers and the way they negotiate with the intensity of the act of killing allows me to construct a concept of “political physiology,” defined as “interlocking intensive processes that articulate the patterns, thresholds, and triggers of emergent bodies, forming assemblages linking the social and the somatic, with sometimes the (...)
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  27. Lester D. Stephens (2006). Joseph LeConte and the Development of the Physiology and Psychology of Vision in the United States. Annals of Science 37 (3):303-321.score: 18.0
    (1980). Joseph LeConte and the development of the physiology and psychology of vision in the United States. Annals of Science: Vol. 37, No. 3, pp. 303-321.
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  28. Katja Guenther (2013). The Disappearing Lesion: Sigmund Freud, Sensory-Motor Physiology, and the Beginnings of Psychoanalysis. Modern Intellectual History 10 (3):569-601.score: 16.0
    Freud's criticism of the localization project as carried out by Theodor Meynert and Carl Wernicke has usually been seen as marking his break with contemporaneous brain science. In this article, however, I show that Freud criticized localization not by turning his back on brain science, but rather by radicalizing some of its principles. In particular, he argued that the physiological pretensions of the localization project remained at odds with its uncritical importation of psychological categories. Further, by avoiding a confusion of (...)
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  29. Alasdair I. Houston & John M. McNamara (2000). Adaptive Accounts of Physiology and Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):201-202.score: 16.0
    Rolls discusses various adaptive explanations of physiological processes and the emotions. We give a critical analysis of some of these from the perspective of behavioural ecology. While agreeing with the approach adopted by Rolls, we identify topics that could have been better presented by making use of the existing literature.
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  30. Stéphane Genet, Robert Costalat & Jacques Burger (2000). A Few Comments on Electrostatic Interactions in Cell Physiology. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (3-4).score: 16.0
    The role of fixed charges present at the surface of biological membranes is usually described by the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame theory of the electric double-layer where the Grahame equation is applied independently on each side of the membrane and where the capacitive charges (linked to the transmembrane ionic currents) are disregarded. In this article, we generalize the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame theory by taking into account both intrinsic charges (resulting from the dissociation of membrane constituents) and capacitive charges, in the density value of the membrane (...)
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  31. T. Clausen (1981). Physiology of Non-Excitable Cells. In G. Adam, I. Meszaros & E. I. Banyai (eds.), Advances in Physiological Science. 3--209.score: 16.0
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  32. Alfredo Pereira Jr, Maria AliceOrnellas Pereira & FábioAugusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183.score: 16.0
    The discovery of participation of astrocytes as active elements in glutamatergic tripartite synapses (composed by functional units of two neurons and one astrocyte) has led to the construction of models of cognitive functioning in the human brain, focusing on associative learning, sensory integration, conscious processing and memory formation/retrieval. We have modelled human cognitive functions by means of an ensemble of functional units (tripartite synapses) connected by gap junctions that link distributed astrocytes, allowing the formation of intra- and intercellular calcium waves (...)
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  33. Kirsten Besheer (2009). Descartes' Doubts: Physiology and the First Meditation. Philosophical Forum 40 (1):55-97.score: 15.0
  34. Robert Michael Brain (2008). The Pulse of Modernism: Experimental Physiology and Aesthetic Avant-Gardes Circa 1900. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):393-417.score: 15.0
  35. John Sutton (2010). Carelessness and Inattention: Mind-Wandering and the Physiology of Fantasy From Locke to Hume. In Charles Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: embodied empiricism in early modern science. Springer. 243--263.score: 15.0
    1. The restless mind[1] Like us, early modern philosophers, both natural and moral, didn’t always understand the springs of their own actions. They didn’t want to feel everything they felt, and couldn’t trace the sources of all their thoughts and imaginings. Events from past experience come to mind again unwilled: abstract thought is interrupted by fantastical images, like the ‘winged horses, fiery dragons, and monstrous giants’ by which Hume exemplified ‘the liberty of the imagination’[2]. Then, as now, a failure to (...)
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  36. Bruce Bridgeman (1986). Relations Between the Physiology of Attention and the Physiology of Consciousness. Psychological Research 48:259-266.score: 15.0
  37. C. L. Hardin (1992). Physiology, Phenomenology, and Spinoza's True Colors. In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter.score: 15.0
  38. John Bricke (1975). Interaction and Physiology. Mind 84 (April):255-9.score: 15.0
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  39. Andrea Rehberg (2002). The Overcoming of Physiology. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 23 (1):39-50.score: 15.0
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  40. Soraya de Chadarevian (1993). Graphical Method and Discipline: Self-Recording Instruments in Nineteenth-Century Physiology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (2):267-291.score: 15.0
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  41. Eyal Chowers (2002). The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and its Political Exile. Political Theory 30 (5):649-676.score: 15.0
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  42. Walter Glannon (2002). The Psychology and Physiology of Depression. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):265-269.score: 15.0
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  43. John Thomas Wilke (1981). Personal Identity in the Light of Brain Physiology and Cognitive Psychology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (3):323-334.score: 15.0
    The concept of the person, and the notion that the latter is an entity separate and distinct from other persons, has persisted as one of the more secure ‘givens’ of philosophical thought. We have very little difficulty, in observer language, in pointing to a person, describing his or her attributes, distinguishing him or her from other persons, etc. Likewise, it is ordinarily not much of a problem to subjectively experience, both sensorially and conceptually, the self – that is, to distinguish (...)
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  44. Irving Thalberg (1970). New Light on Brain Physiology and Free Will? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (4):379-383.score: 15.0
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  45. Catherine Packham (2002). The Physiology of Political Economy: Vitalism and Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations. Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (3):465-481.score: 15.0
  46. Olivia Gosseries, Erik Ziegler, Steven Laureys, Aurore Thibaut & Camille Chatelle, Spasticity After Stroke: Physiology, Assessment and Treatment.score: 15.0
    Background: Spasticity following a stroke occurs in about 30% of patients. The mechanisms underlying this disorder, however, are not well understood. Method: This review aims to define spasticity, describe hypotheses explaining its development after a stroke, give an overview of related neuroimaging studies as well as a description of the most common scales used to quantify the degree of spasticity and finally explore which treatments are currently being used to treat this disorder.
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  47. John Protevi, Between Geophilosophy and Political Physiology.score: 15.0
    But first, let me note that these two are terms derived more or less directly from the collaborative work of the French philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. Now I think it’s important that analytic and continental philosophers learn to talk to each other, and I’m convinced that Deleuze and Guattari’s work, when properly explained, provides a common ground for this discussion. That’s because they provide the ontology and epistemology for a world that is able to yield the results we (...)
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  48. Maria Borges (2008). Physiology and the Controlling of Affects in Kant's Philosophy. Kantian Review 13 (2):46-66.score: 15.0
  49. Pavel Gregoric & Martin Kuhar (2014). Aristotle's Physiology of Animal Motion: On Neura and Muscles. Apeiron 3 (1):6390.score: 15.0
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  50. Timothy Lenoir (1981). Teleology Without Regrets. The Transformation of Physiology in Germany: 1790–1847. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (4):293-354.score: 15.0
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