Search results for 'Physiology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  27
    Charles A. Campbell (1953). Philosophy and Brain Physiology. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (January):51-56.
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  2. James Mark Baldwin (1940). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education, and Giving a Terminology in English, French, German, and Italian. New York, P. Smith.
  3. James Mark Baldwin (1940). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education. P. Smith.
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  4. James Mark Baldwin (1960). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education; and Giving a Terminology in English, French, German, and Italian. Written by Many Hands and Edited by James Mark Baldwin, with the Co-Operation and Assistance of an International Board of Consulting Editors. P. Smith.
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  5. John Stewart (1813). The Scripture of Reason and Nature the Laws of Intellect : The Laws of Virtue : The Laws of Policy : The Laws of Physiology, or, the Philosophy of Sense : Developing the Origin, End, Essence and Constitution of Nature. Printed for T. Egerton.
     
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  6.  2
    Paolo Tripodi (2013). Conceptual Mediation: Philosophy Between the History of Physiology and Contemporary Neuroscience. History of European Ideas 40 (4):1-12.
    In the 1780s the anatomist Vincenzo Malacarne discussed the possibility of testing experimentally whether experience can induce significant changes in the brain. Malacarne imagined taking two littermate animals and giving intensive training to one while the other received none, then dissecting their brains to see whether the trained animal had more folds in the cerebellum than the untrained one. This experimental design somewhat anticipated one used 180 years later by Mark R. Rosenzweig at the University of California, Berkeley. This paper (...)
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  7.  18
    Maria Borges (2008). Physiology and the Controlling of Affects in Kant's Philosophy. Kantian Review 13 (2):46-66.
    Kant is categorical about the relation between virtue and the controlling of inclinations:Since virtue is based on inner freedom it contains a positive command to a human being, namely to bring all his capacities and inclinations under his reason's control and so to rule over himself. Virtue presupposes apathy, in the sense of absence of affects. Kant revives the stoic ideal of tranquilitas as a necessary condition for virtue: ‘The true strength of virtue is a tranquil mind’ . In the (...)
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  8.  4
    Jeffrey R. Botkin & Stephen G. Post (1991). Confusion in the Determination of Death: Distinguishing Philosophy From Physiology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (1):129-138.
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  9.  2
    Constance C. W. Naden (1889). On Mental Physiology and Its Place in Philosophy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 1 (3):81 - 82.
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  10. L. Boschetto (1995). Democritus and the Physiology of Madness-the Parody of Philosophy and Medicine in Alberti, Leon, Battista'momus'. Rinascimento 35:3-29.
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  11. Joseph Le Conte (1892). The Relation of Philosophy to Psychology and to Physiology. Josiah Royce. Ethics 3:275.
     
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  12. Constance C. W. Naden (1890). II.—On Mental Physiology and Its Place in Philosophy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 3:81-82.
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  13.  7
    Eduard Glas (1979). Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations. Delft University Press.
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
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  14. A. Berthoz (2008). The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action. Oxford University Press.
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining sensory data before deciding how (...)
     
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  15. Rex Welshon (2011). Philosophy, Neuroscience, and Consciousness. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Philosophy and consciousness. Consciousness and conscious properties ; Identity, supervenience, reduction and emergence ; Reductive and non-reductive physicalisms ; Representationalist theories of conscious properties -- Neuroscience and consciousness. Cortical evolution and modularity ; Arousal, perception and effect ; Attention, working memory, language and executive function ; Neural models of conscious properties -- Philosophy, neuroscience and consciousness. Measurement, localization, models and dissociation ; Correlates, realizers and multiple realization ; Microphysical reduction, overdetermination and coupling ; Embodied and embedded consciousness -- (...)
     
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  16.  1
    Gary Hatfield (2012). Psychology. In Allen W. Wood & Songsuk Susan Hahn (eds.), The Cambridge History of Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century (1790-1870). Cambridge University Press 241-262.
    The quantitative experimental scientific psychology that became prominent by the turn of the twentieth century grew from three main areas of intellectual inquiry. First and most directly, it arose out of the traditional psychology of the philosophy curriculum, as expressed in theories of mind and cognition. Second, it adopted the attitudes of the new natural philosophy of the scientific revolution, attitudes of empirically driven causal analysis and exact observation and experimentation. Third, it drew upon investigations of the senses. (...)
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  17. Frank Stahnisch (2012). Medicine, Life and Function: Experimental Strategies and Medical Modernity at the Intersection of Pathology and Physiology. Project Verlag.
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  18.  7
    Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Ursula Welscher (2008). Anthropology and Philosophy in Agenda 21 of UNO. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:195-202.
    Agenda 21 of United Nations demands better situation of ecology, economy, health, etc. in all countries. An evaluation of scientific contributions in international congresses of fundamental anthropological sciences (philosophy, psychology, psychosomatics, physiology, genito-urology, radio-oncology, etc.) demonstratesevidence of large discrepancies in the participation not only of developing and industrial countries, but also between the last ones themselves. Low degree of research and education leads to low degree of economy, health, ecology, etc. [Lit.: Neu, Michailov et al.: Physiology in (...)
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  19.  11
    Arno Ros (1996). Bemerkungen Zum Verhältnis Zwischen Neurophysiologie Und Psychologie. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (1):91 - 130.
    Remarks on the Relations between Neurophysiology and Psychology. In the last decades of Analytical Philosophy, contributions to the so-called mind-body-problem have been suffering by several serious methodological misunderstandings: they have failed, for instance, to distinguish between explanations of particular and strictly general ("necessary") properties and between two important senses of existential statements; and they have overlooked the role conceptual explanations play in the development of science. Changing our methodological premisses, we should be able to put questions like that of (...)
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  20.  17
    Gary Hatfield (1992). Descartes' Physiology and its Relation to His Psychology. In John Cottingham (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Descartes. Cambridge University Press 335--370.
    Descartes understood the subject matter of physics (or natural philosophy) to encompass the whole of nature, including living things. It therefore comprised not only nonvital phenomena, including those we would now denominate as physical, chemical, minerological, magnetic, and atmospheric; it also extended to the world of plants and animals, including the human animal (with the exception of those aspects of the human mind that Descartes assigned to solely to thinking substance: pure intellect and will). Descartes wrote extensively on (...) and on the physiology and psychology of the senses. This chapter examines the notions of *physiology* and *psychology* in medical and natural philosophical works of Descartes' day; follows his efforts to bring physiology into his mechanistic idiom; considers the relation between physiology of the animal machine and psychological functions that yield functionally appropriate behavior; goes into his physiology and psychology of vision; and elaborates the tension in Descartes' works between his metaphysically supported micro-corpuscularism and his discussion of the animal machine as an organic unity comprising various functionally and teleologically characterized systems. (shrink)
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  21. Charles T. Wolfe, Teleomechanism Redux? The Conceptual Hybridity of Living Machines in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.
    We have been accustomed at least since Kant and mainstream history of philosophy to distinguish between the ‘mechanical’ and the ‘teleological’; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature exemplified by Newton and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings ultimately expressed in the concept of ‘organism’ – a purposive entity, or at least an entity possessed of functions. The beauty of this distinction is that it seems to make intuitive sense and to map onto historical and conceptual constellations (...)
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  22.  13
    Martha Blassnigg (2010). Revisiting Marey's Applications of Scientific Moving Image Technologies in the Context of Bergson's Philosophy: Audio-Visual Mediation and the Experience of Time. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (3):175-184.
    This paper revisits some early applications of audio-visual imaging technologies used in physiology in a dialogue with reflections on Henri Bergson’s philosophy. It focuses on the aspects of time and memory in relation to spatial representations of movement measurements and critically discusses them from the perspective of the observing participant and the public exhibitions of scientific films. Departing from an audio-visual example, this paper is informed by a thick description of the philosophical implications and contemporary discourses surrounding the (...)
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  23. Wayne Klein (1993). Between Physiology and Semiology: Language and Materiality in the Writings of Nietzsche. Dissertation, New School for Social Research
    This dissertation examines the questions of interpretation raised by the naturalist vocabulary employed by Nietzsche in the writings of his last creative years, 1885-88. In particular, the concepts of life, physiology and nature which are central to these texts are elucidated in relation to the theory of language and rhetoric that Nietzsche developed in the early 1870's. The first chapter details the problems posed by this naturalistic vocabulary: in particular whether it justifies the interpretation of Nietzsche as a contradictory (...)
     
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  24.  48
    John Sutton (2007). Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about (...)
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  25. John Sutton (1998). Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about (...)
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  26.  10
    Rodolfo Garau (2016). Springs, Nitre, and Conatus. The Role of the Heart in Hobbes's Physiology and Animal Locomotion. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):231-256.
    This paper focuses on an understudied aspect of Hobbes's natural philosophy: his approach to the domain of life. I concentrate on the role assigned by Hobbes to the heart, which occupies a central role in both his account of human physiology and of the origin of animal locomotion. With this, I have three goals in mind. First, I aim to offer a cross-section of Hobbes's effort to provide a mechanistic picture of human life. Second, I aim to contextualize (...)
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  27.  15
    Tamás Demeter (2012). The Anatomy and Physiology of Mind: Hume's Vitalistic Account. In H. F. J. Horstmanshoff, H. King & C. Zittel (eds.), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Brill
    In this paper I challenge the widely held view which associates Hume’s philosophy with mechanical philosophies of nature and particularly with Newton. This view presents Hume’s account of the human mind as passive receiver of impressions which bring into motion, from the outside, a mental machinery whose functioning is described in terms of mechanical causal principles. Instead, I propose an interpretation which suggests that for Hume the human mind is composed of faculties that can be characterized by their active (...)
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  28.  7
    Giovanni B. Grandi (2015). Providential Naturalism and Miracles: John Fearn's Critique of Scottish Philosophy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (1):75-94.
    According to Thomas Reid, the development of natural sciences following the model of Newton's Principia and Optics would provide further evidence for the belief in a provident God. This project was still supported by his student, Dugald Stewart, in the early nineteenth century. John Fearn , an early critic of the Scottish common sense school, thought that the rise of ‘infidelity’ in the wake of scientific progress had shown that the apologetic project of Reid and Stewart had failed. In reaction (...)
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  29. Problemata Aristotelis & Aristotle (1683). The Problems of Aristotle with Other Philosophers and Physitians : Wherein Are Contained Divers Questions with Their Answers Touching the Estate of Man's Body. Printed for J. Wright and R. Chiswell.
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  30. John Case & Joseph Barnes (1599). Lapis Philosophicus Seu Commentarius in 8 P0 s Lib: Phys: Aristot: In Quo Arcana Physiologiæexaminantur. Excudebat Ioseph[Us] Barnesi[Us] Oxoniæ.
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  31. Loana Liccioli (2011). Medicina More Mechanico: La Fisiologia di Descartes. Archetipo Libri.
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  32. William Mcdougall (1936). The Philosophy of J. S. Haldane: PHILOSOPHY. Philosophy 11 (44):419-432.
    In a little book of 155 pages the late John Scot Haldane gave the world his final message. Much as his friends and admirers must regret his recent death, we may rejoice that in these few pages he has succeeded in presenting in clear and unmistakable fashion the philosophy which, throughout his long life of highly successful detailed research in physiology combined with equally effective and untiring application of his findings to practical problems, he slowly developed into the (...)
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  33. Problemata & Aristotle (1682). The Problems of Aristotle with Other Philosophers and Physitians. Wherein Are Contained Divers Questions, with Their Answers, Touching the Estate of Mans Body. Printed for J. Wright and R. Chiswel.
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  34.  68
    Uljana Feest (2014). The Continuing Relevance of 19th-Century Philosophy of Psychology: Brentano and the Autonomy of Psychological Methods. In M. C. Galavotti & F. Stadler (eds.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Science, The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective 5. Springer. Springer 693-709.
    This paper provides an analysis of Franz Brentano’s thesis that psychology employs a distinctive method, which sets it apart from physiology. The aim of the paper is two-fold: First, I situate Brentano’s thesis (and the broader metaphysical system that underwrites it) within the context of specific debates about the nature and status of psychology, arguing that we regard him as engaging in a form of boundary work. Second, I explore the relevance of Brentano’s considerations to more recent debates about (...)
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  35.  6
    Bernd Buldt (2016). Johannes von Kries: A Bio-Bibliography. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (1):217-235.
    A short biography of Johannes von Kries, followed by a bibliography of his works, containing more than 70 previously unknown works.
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  36.  33
    John Sutton (1998). Controlling the Passions: Passion, Memory, and the Moral Physiology of Self in Seventeenth-Century Neurophilosophy. In S. Gaukroger (ed.), The Soft Underbelly of Reason: the passions in the 17th century. Routledge 115-146.
    Some natural philosophers in the 17th century believed that they could control their own innards, specifically the animal spirits coursing incessantly through brain and nerves, in order to discipline or harness passion, cognition and action under rational guidance. This chapter addresses the mechanisms thought necessary after Eden for controlling the physiology of passion. The tragedy of human embedding in the body, with its cognitive and moral limitations, was paired with a sense of our confinement in sequential time. I use (...)
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  37.  8
    Jean Gayon, Philosophy of Biology: An Historico-Critical Characterization.
    Literally speaking, "Philosophy of biology" is a rather old expression. William Whewell coined it in 1840, at the very time he introduced the expression "philosophy of science". Whewell was fond of creating neologisms, like Auguste Comte, his French counterpart in the field of the philosophical reflection about science. Historians of science know that a few years earlier, in 1834, Whewell had generated a small scandal when he proposed the word "scientist" as a general term by which "the students (...)
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  38.  8
    Theodore James Tracy (1969). Physiological Theory and the Doctrine of the Mean in Plato and Aristotle. The Hague, Mouton.
  39.  30
    Qiu Renzong (1982). Philosophy of Medicine in China (1930–1980). Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (1):35-73.
    This is a review of the literature in the philosophy of medicine published in China from 1930 to 1980. The topics dealt with include the relationship between medicine and philosophy, the basic concepts of medicine, etiology and causality, the bearing of psychology on physiology and pathology, epistemology in diagnostics, methodology of medical sciences, philosophical and methological problems in traditional Chinese medicine, philosophical problems in health policy, and medical ethics.
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  40.  22
    John Sutton (1998). Preface to Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. In [Book Chapter].
    Philosophy and Memory Traces, the book to which this is the preface, defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are ‘stored’ only superpositionally, and are reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory (...)
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  41.  3
    Edgar Landgraf (2014). Circling the Archimedean Viewpoint: Observations of Physiology in Nietzsche and Luhmann. Substance 43 (3):88-106.
    The question of how our conception of the world could differ so widely from the disclosed nature of the world will with perfect equanimity be relinquished to the physiology and history of the evolution of organisms and concepts.In an interview conducted by the Italian literary journal Alfabeta in April of 1987,1 Niklas Luhmann was asked if sociology, in particular its systems-theoretical variant, could replace the privileged position that art, religion, philosophy, and politics had lost, and provide an Archimedean (...)
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  42.  1
    Tamas Demeter (2015). Abstraction, Dissociation, and Mental Labor: Paul Szende’s Social Epistemology Between Physiology and Social Theory. Studies in East European Thought 67 (1 - 2):13-30.
    In this paper I focus on the Hungarian intellectual and politician Paul Szende’s sociologically oriented epistemology. I trace the influences of physiology, psychology, economy, evolutionary theory of his day on his sociological theory of abstractive knowledge, and discuss the close connection between physiological, social, and economic aspects in the early sociology of knowledge. My discussion continues with an examination of Szende’s differentiation between two economic effects within social epistemology: on the one hand the ‘economy of thought’ in the tradition (...)
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  43.  2
    John J. Compton (1988). Phenomenology and the Philosophy of Nature. Man and World 21 (1):65-89.
    Despite Platonism's unquestioned claim to being one of the most influential movements in the history of philosophy, for a long time the conventional wisdom was that Platonists of late antiquity, or Neoplatonists, were so focused on otherworldly metaphysics that they simply neglected any serious study of the sensible world, which after all is 'merely' an image of the intelligible world. Only recently has this conventional wisdom begun to be dispelled. In fact, it is precisely because these thinkers did see (...)
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  44. James R. Ballantyne (2013). Synopsis of Science: From the Standpoint of the Nyaya Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    James Robert Ballantyne taught oriental languages in India for sixteen years, compiling grammars of Hindi, Sanskrit and Persian, along with translations of Hindu philosophy. In 1859, for the use of Christian missionaries, he prepared a guide to Hinduism, in English and Sanskrit. Published in two volumes in 1852, Synopsis of Science was intended to introduce his Indian pupils to Western science by using the framework of Hindu Nyaya philosophy, which was familiar to them and which Ballantyne greatly respected. (...)
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  45. Jill Marsden (2002). After Nietzsche: Notes Towards a Philosophy of Ecstasy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book explores the imaginative possibilities for philosophy created by Nietzsche's sustained reflection on the phenomenon of ecstasy. From The Birth of Tragedy to his experimental "physiology of art," Nietzsche examines the aesthetic, erotic, and sacred dimensions of rapture, hinting at how an ecstatic philosophy is realized in his elusive doctrine of Eternal Return. Jill Marsden pursues the implications of this legacy for contemporary Continental thought via analyses of such voyages in ecstasy as Kant, Schopenhauer, Schreber, and (...)
     
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  46. Hazim B. Murad (1990). Mach Revisited: A Reinterpretation of Mach's Philosophy of Science, and of His Opposition to Atomism. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    In this dissertation, I examine the origins and nature of Mach's philosophy, or rather theory, of science. I show how it relates to, and is informed by, his own works in physiology, psychophysics, physics, and the history and psychology of science. I argue that Mach's theory of science grew out of his concern to provide a single, unified--albeit coherent--perspective on both the life and physical sciences. Corresponding to this conceptual unification of perspectives in the different branches of knowledge, (...)
     
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  47. Shannon Sullivan (2015). The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression. Oxford University Press Usa.
    While gender and race often are considered socially constructed, this book argues that they are physiologically constituted through the biopsychosocial effects of sexism and racism. This means that to be fully successful, critical philosophy of race and feminist philosophy need to examine not only the financial, legal, political and other forms of racist and sexism oppression, but also their physiological operations. Examining a complex tangle of affects, emotions, knowledge, and privilege, The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression (...)
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  48. Shannon Sullivan (2015). The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression. Oxford University Press Usa.
    While gender and race often are considered socially constructed, this book argues that they are physiologically constituted through the biopsychosocial effects of sexism and racism. This means that to be fully successful, critical philosophy of race and feminist philosophy need to examine not only the financial, legal, political and other forms of racist and sexism oppression, but also their physiological operations. Examining a complex tangle of affects, emotions, knowledge, and privilege, The Physiology of Sexist and Racist Oppression (...)
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  49. Elvira Wakelnig (ed.) (2014). A Philosophy Reader From the Circle of Miskawayh: Text, Translation and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume presents the first complete edition of Oxford, MS Marsh 539, a hitherto unpublished philosophy reader compiled anonymously in the eastern Islamic world in the eleventh century. The compilation consists of texts on metaphysics, physiology and ethics, providing excerpts from Arabic versions of Greek philosophical works and works by Arabic authors. It preserves fragments of Greek-Arabic translations lost today, including Galen's On My Own Opinions, the Summa Alexandrinorum, and Themistius on Aristotle's Book Lambda. The philosophy reader (...)
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  50.  14
    Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.) (2008). Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years consciousness has become a significant area of study in the cognitive sciences. The Frontiers of Consciousness is a major interdisciplinary exploration of consciousness. The book stems from the Chichele lectures held at All Souls College in Oxford, and features contributions from a 'who's who' of authorities from both philosophy and psychology. The result is a truly interdisciplinary volume, which tackles some of the biggest and most impenetrable problems in consciousness. The book includes chapters considering the apparent (...)
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