Search results for 'Physiology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles A. Campbell (1953). Philosophy and Brain Physiology. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (January):51-56.score: 42.0
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  2. Eduard Glas (1979). Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations. Delft University Press.score: 42.0
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
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  3. James Mark Baldwin (1940). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education, and Giving a Terminology in English, French, German, and Italian. New York, P. Smith.score: 42.0
  4. Arno Ros (1996). Bemerkungen Zum Verhältnis Zwischen Neurophysiologie Und Psychologie. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (1):91 - 130.score: 39.0
    Remarks on the Relations between Neurophysiology and Psychology. In the last decades of Analytical Philosophy, contributions to the so-called mind-body-problem have been suffering by several serious methodological misunderstandings: they have failed, for instance, to distinguish between explanations of particular and strictly general ("necessary") properties and between two important senses of existential statements; and they have overlooked the role conceptual explanations play in the development of science. Changing our methodological premisses, we should be able to put questions like that of (...)
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  5. Maria Borges (2008). Physiology and the Controlling of Affects in Kant's Philosophy. Kantian Review 13 (2):46-66.score: 36.0
  6. Constance C. W. Naden (1889). On Mental Physiology and Its Place in Philosophy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 1 (3):81 - 82.score: 36.0
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  7. A. Berthoz (2008). The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining sensory data before deciding how (...)
     
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  8. L. Boschetto (1995). Democritus and the Physiology of Madness-the Parody of Philosophy and Medicine in Alberti, Leon, Battista'momus'. Rinascimento 35:3-29.score: 36.0
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  9. Jeffrey R. Botkin & Stephen G. Post (1991). Confusion in the Determination of Death: Distinguishing Philosophy From Physiology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (1):129-138.score: 36.0
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  10. Paolo Tripodi (2013). Conceptual Mediation: Philosophy Between the History of Physiology and Contemporary Neuroscience. History of European Ideas:1-12.score: 36.0
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  11. Maurice B. Visscher (1979). History of Physiology in Britain Michael Foster and the Cambridge School of Philosophy; The Scientific Enterprise in Late Victorian Society Gerald L. Geisen. Bioscience 29 (3):180-180.score: 36.0
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  12. Frank Stahnisch (2012). Medicine, Life and Function: Experimental Strategies and Medical Modernity at the Intersection of Pathology and Physiology. Project Verlag.score: 33.0
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  13. Loana Liccioli (2011). Medicina More Mechanico: La Fisiologia di Descartes. Archetipo Libri.score: 30.0
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  14. Charles T. Wolfe, Teleomechanism Redux? The Conceptual Hybridity of Living Machines in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.score: 27.0
    We have been accustomed at least since Kant and mainstream history of philosophy to distinguish between the ‘mechanical’ and the ‘teleological’; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature exemplified by Newton (or Galileo, or Descartes) and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings ultimately expressed in the concept of ‘organism’ – a purposive entity, or at least an entity possessed of functions. The beauty of this distinction is that it seems to make intuitive sense and to map onto (...)
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  15. Martha Blassnigg (2010). Revisiting Marey's Applications of Scientific Moving Image Technologies in the Context of Bergson's Philosophy: Audio-Visual Mediation and the Experience of Time. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (3):175-184.score: 27.0
    This paper revisits some early applications of audio-visual imaging technologies used in physiology in a dialogue with reflections on Henri Bergson’s philosophy. It focuses on the aspects of time and memory in relation to spatial representations of movement measurements and critically discusses them from the perspective of the observing participant and the public exhibitions of scientific films. Departing from an audio-visual example, this paper is informed by a thick description of the philosophical implications and contemporary discourses surrounding the (...)
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  16. Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.) (2008). Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    In recent years consciousness has become a significant area of study in the cognitive sciences. The Frontiers of Consciousness is a major interdisciplinary exploration of consciousness. The book stems from the Chichele lectures held at All Souls College in Oxford, and features contributions from a 'who's who' of authorities from both philosophy and psychology. The result is a truly interdisciplinary volume, which tackles some of the biggest and most impenetrable problems in consciousness. The book includes chapters considering the apparent (...)
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  17. Wilhelm Blasius (1976). Problems of Life Research: Physiological Analyses and Phenomenological Interpretations. Springer-Verlag.score: 27.0
     
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  18. Theodore James Tracy (1969). Physiological Theory and the Doctrine of the Mean in Plato and Aristotle. The Hague, Mouton.score: 27.0
  19. John Sutton (1998). Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about (...)
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  20. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
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  21. Daniel Steel (2008). Across the Boundaries: Extrapolation in Biology and Social Science. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Inferences like these are known as extrapolations.
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  22. Mark B. Adams (2000). Last Judgment: The Visionary Biology of J. B. S. Haldane. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):457 - 491.score: 24.0
    This paper seeks to reinterpret the life and work of J. B. S. Haldane by focusing on an illuminating but largely ignored essay he published in 1927, "The Last Judgment" -- the sequel to his better known work, "Daedalus" (1924). This astonishing essay expresses a vision of the human future over the next 40,000,000 years, one that revises and updates Wellsian futurism with the long range implications of the "new biology" for human destiny. That vision served as a kind of (...)
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  23. Tamás Demeter (2012). The Anatomy and Physiology of Mind: Hume's Vitalistic Account. In H. F. J. Horstmanshoff, H. King & C. Zittel (eds.), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Brill.score: 24.0
    In this paper I challenge the widely held view which associates Hume’s philosophy with mechanical philosophies of nature and particularly with Newton. This view presents Hume’s account of the human mind as passive receiver of impressions which bring into motion, from the outside, a mental machinery whose functioning is described in terms of mechanical causal principles. Instead, I propose an interpretation which suggests that for Hume the human mind is composed of faculties that can be characterized by their active (...)
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  24. Bruce J. West (2007). Where Medicine Went Wrong: Rediscovering the Path to Complexity. World Scientific.score: 24.0
    Where Medicine Went Wrong explores how the idea of an average value has been misapplied to medical phenomena, distorted understanding and lead to flawed medical ...
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  25. Ash Gobar (1968). Philosophic Foundations Of Genetic Psychology And Gestalt Psychology. Martinus Nilboff.score: 24.0
     
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  26. la Mettrie & Julien Offray (1960). L'homme Machine: A Study in the Origins of an Idea. Princeton University Press.score: 24.0
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  27. Russ McBride (2012). A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction.
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  28. A. N. Medeli͡anovskiĭ (2004). Neobychnye Vozmozhnosti Cheloveka I Teorii͡a Vlasti: Metody I Priemy Ispolʹzovanii͡a Bioėnergetiki, Vzaimodeĭstvie Cheloveka I Vselennoĭ, Strategii͡a Vlasti I Zakony Prirody. Aĭris-Press.score: 24.0
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  29. Randolph M. Nesse (1996). Evolution and Healing: The New Science of Darwinian Medicine. Phoenix.score: 24.0
    The first ever description of how evolutionary principles can be applied to questions of health and sickness.
     
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  30. Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Ursula Welscher (2008). Anthropology and Philosophy in Agenda 21 of UNO. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:195-202.score: 24.0
    Agenda 21 of United Nations demands better situation of ecology, economy, health, etc. in all countries. An evaluation of scientific contributions in international congresses of fundamental anthropological sciences (philosophy, psychology, psychosomatics, physiology, genito-urology, radio-oncology, etc.) demonstratesevidence of large discrepancies in the participation not only of developing and industrial countries, but also between the last ones themselves. Low degree of research and education leads to low degree of economy, health, ecology, etc. [Lit.: Neu, Michailov et al.: Physiology in (...)
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  31. Chris Nunn (2005). De La Mettrie's Ghost: The Story of Decisions. Macmillan.score: 24.0
    This book is about how we make choices. It is a compelling analysis of the nature of free will, drawing together evidence from chemistry, literature, politics, history and beyond. Psychiatrist Chris Nunn elegantly explores the revolutions in medicine, genetics, bioethics and neuroscience spurred by Julien de la Mettrie's 300-year-old tract Man the Machine . Nunn concludes that a mechanistic view of the human brain, though once fruitful, is now moribund. He proposes a powerful alternative: that stories, recorded in our memories (...)
     
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  32. J. M. Rist (1987). Pseudo-Ammonius and the Soul/Body Problem in Some Platonic Texts of Late Antiquity. American Journal of Philology 109 (3):402-415.score: 24.0
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  33. M. Segala (2000). [Animal electricity, animal magnetism, universal galvanism: in search of universal harmony between humanity and nature]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (1):71-84.score: 24.0
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  34. Mario von Cranach (1976). Methods Of Inference From Animal To Human Behaviour. The Hague: Mouton.score: 24.0
     
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  35. Elliott White (1992). The End of the Empty Organism: Neurobiology and the Sciences of Human Action. Praeger.score: 24.0
  36. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.score: 21.0
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, (...)
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  37. Babette E. Babich (2003). On the Analytic-Continental Divide in Philosophy : Nietzsche's Lying Truth, Heidegger's Speaking Language, and Philosophy. In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books.score: 21.0
    On the political nature of the analytic - continental distinction in professional philosophy and the general tendency to discredit continental philosophy while redesignating the rubric as analytically conceived.
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  38. Lydia Patton (2010). Review of Makkreel and Luft, Eds., Neo-Kantianism in Contemporary Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 30 (4):280-282.score: 21.0
    A volume dealing seriously with the influence of the major schools of Neo-Kantian thought on contemporary philosophy has been needed sorely for some time. But this volume of essays aims higher: it 'is published in the hopes that it will secure Neo-Kantianism a significant place in contemporary philosophical discussions' (Introduction, 1). The aim of the book, then, is partly to provide a history of major Neo-Kantian thinkers and their influence, and partly to argue for their importance in contemporary (continental) (...)
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  39. Joshua Knobe (2007). Experimental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):81–92.score: 21.0
    Claims about people's intuitions have long played an important role in philosophical debates. The new field of experimental philosophy seeks to subject such claims to rigorous tests using the traditional methods of cognitive science – systematic experimentation and statistical analysis. Work in experimental philosophy thus far has investigated people's intuitions in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics. Although it is now generally agreed that experimental philosophers have made surprising discoveries about people's intuitions in (...)
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  40. Neil Levy & Yasuko Kitano (2011). We're All Folk: An Interview with Neil Levy About Experimental Philosophy and Conceptual Analysis. Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 19:87-98.score: 21.0
    The following is a transcript of the interview I (Yasuko Kitano) conducted with Neil Levy (The Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, CAPPE) on the 23rd in July 2009, while he was in Tokyo to give a series of lectures on neuroethics at The University of Tokyo Center for Philosophy. I edited his words for publication with his approval.
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  41. Ian Hacking (2011). Why is There Philosophy of Mathematics AT ALL? South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):1-15.score: 21.0
    Mathematics plays an inordinate role in the work of many of famous Western philosophers, from the time of Plato, through Husserl and Wittgenstein, and even to the present. Why? This paper points to the experience of learning or making mathematics, with an emphasis on proof. It distinguishes two sources of the perennial impact of mathematics on philosophy. They are classified as Ancient and Enlightenment. Plato is emblematic of the former, and Kant of the latter. The Ancient fascination arises from (...)
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  42. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. 423--434.score: 21.0
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, from the (...)
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  43. Mark Schroeder (2012). Philosophy of Language for Metaethics. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Metaethics is the study of metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language, insofar as they relate to the subject matter of moral or, more broadly, normative discourse – the subject matter of what is good, bad, right or wrong, just, reasonable, rational, what we must or ought to do, or otherwise. But out of these four ‘core’ areas of philosophy, it is plausibly the philosophy of language that is most central to metaethics (...)
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  44. Dermot Moran (2008). Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.score: 21.0
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, (...)
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  45. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Doctor Who and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy Now 89 (Mar/Apr):43-44.score: 21.0
    The good Doctor has a lot to say about philosophy.
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  46. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 21.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and (...)
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  47. Mark Kaplan (1983). Decision Theory as Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 50 (4):549-577.score: 21.0
    Is Bayesian decision theory a panacea for many of the problems in epistemology and the philosophy of science, or is it philosophical snake-oil? For years a debate had been waged amongst specialists regarding the import and legitimacy of this body of theory. Mark Kaplan had written the first accessible and non-technical book to address this controversy. Introducing a new variant on Bayesian decision theory the author offers a compelling case that, while no panacea, decision theory does in fact have (...)
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  48. John Bickle, Pete Mandik & Anthony Landreth, The Philosophy of Neuroscience. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
    Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Philosophy of neuroscience is a natural result. This emerging area was also spurred by remarkable recent growth in the neurosciences. Cognitive and computational neuroscience continues to encroach upon issues traditionally addressed within the humanities, including the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, and normativity. Empirical discoveries about brain structure and (...)
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  49. Paul Hoyningen-Huene (1993). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm shifts and (...)
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  50. Markus Schrenk (2010). Mauro Dorato * The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (E-Version) 62 (1):225-232.score: 21.0
    This is a review of Mauro Dorato's book "The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature".
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