Search results for 'Physiology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles A. Campbell (1953). Philosophy and Brain Physiology. Philosophical Quarterly 3 (January):51-56.score: 84.0
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  2. Eduard Glas (1979). Chemistry and Physiology in Their Historical and Philosophical Relations. Delft University Press.score: 84.0
    On the whole our study has made a plea for the combined research into the history, methodology and philosophy of science. There is an intricate communication between these aspects of science, philosophy being both a fruit of scientific developments and a higher-level frame of reference for discussion on the inevicable metaphysical issues in science.As such philosophy can be very useful to science, but should never impose its ideas on the conduct of scientists . ... Zie: Summary.
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  3. James Mark Baldwin (1940). Dictionary of Philosophy and Psychology, Including Many of the Principal Conceptions of Ethics, Logic, Aesthetics, Philosophy of Religion, Mental Pathology, Anthropology, Biology, Neurology, Physiology, Economics, Political and Social Philosophy, Philology, Physical Science, and Education, and Giving a Terminology in English, French, German, and Italian. New York, P. Smith.score: 84.0
  4. Arno Ros (1996). Bemerkungen Zum Verhältnis Zwischen Neurophysiologie Und Psychologie. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 27 (1):91 - 130.score: 78.0
    Remarks on the Relations between Neurophysiology and Psychology. In the last decades of Analytical Philosophy, contributions to the so-called mind-body-problem have been suffering by several serious methodological misunderstandings: they have failed, for instance, to distinguish between explanations of particular and strictly general ("necessary") properties and between two important senses of existential statements; and they have overlooked the role conceptual explanations play in the development of science. Changing our methodological premisses, we should be able to put questions like that of (...)
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  5. Maria Borges (2008). Physiology and the Controlling of Affects in Kant's Philosophy. Kantian Review 13 (2):46-66.score: 72.0
  6. Paolo Tripodi (2013). Conceptual Mediation: Philosophy Between the History of Physiology and Contemporary Neuroscience. History of European Ideas:1-12.score: 72.0
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  7. Jeffrey R. Botkin & Stephen G. Post (1991). Confusion in the Determination of Death: Distinguishing Philosophy From Physiology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 36 (1):129-138.score: 72.0
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  8. Constance C. W. Naden (1889). On Mental Physiology and Its Place in Philosophy. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 1 (3):81 - 82.score: 72.0
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  9. A. Berthoz (2008). The Physiology and Phenomenology of Action. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    Though many philosophers of mind have taken an interest in the great developments in the brain sciences, the interest is seldom reciprocated by scientists, who frequently ignore the contributions philosophers have made to our understanding of the mind and brain. In a rare collaboration, a world famous brain scientist and an eminent philosopher have joined forces in an effort to understand how our brain interacts with the world. Does the brain behave as a calculator, combining sensory data before deciding how (...)
     
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  10. L. Boschetto (1995). Democritus and the Physiology of Madness-the Parody of Philosophy and Medicine in Alberti, Leon, Battista'momus'. Rinascimento 35:3-29.score: 72.0
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  11. Maurice B. Visscher (1979). History of Physiology in Britain Michael Foster and the Cambridge School of Philosophy; The Scientific Enterprise in Late Victorian Society Gerald L. Geisen. Bioscience 29 (3):180-180.score: 72.0
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  12. Frank Stahnisch (2012). Medicine, Life and Function: Experimental Strategies and Medical Modernity at the Intersection of Pathology and Physiology. Project Verlag.score: 66.0
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  13. Loana Liccioli (2011). Medicina More Mechanico: La Fisiologia di Descartes. Archetipo Libri.score: 60.0
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  14. Charles T. Wolfe, Teleomechanism Redux? The Conceptual Hybridity of Living Machines in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.score: 54.0
    We have been accustomed at least since Kant and mainstream history of philosophy to distinguish between the ‘mechanical’ and the ‘teleological’; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature exemplified by Newton (or Galileo, or Descartes) and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings ultimately expressed in the concept of ‘organism’ – a purposive entity, or at least an entity possessed of functions. The beauty of this distinction is that it seems to make intuitive sense and to map onto (...)
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  15. Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.) (2008). Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    In recent years consciousness has become a significant area of study in the cognitive sciences. The Frontiers of Consciousness is a major interdisciplinary exploration of consciousness. The book stems from the Chichele lectures held at All Souls College in Oxford, and features contributions from a 'who's who' of authorities from both philosophy and psychology. The result is a truly interdisciplinary volume, which tackles some of the biggest and most impenetrable problems in consciousness. The book includes chapters considering the apparent (...)
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  16. Martha Blassnigg (2010). Revisiting Marey's Applications of Scientific Moving Image Technologies in the Context of Bergson's Philosophy: Audio-Visual Mediation and the Experience of Time. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (3):175-184.score: 54.0
    This paper revisits some early applications of audio-visual imaging technologies used in physiology in a dialogue with reflections on Henri Bergson’s philosophy. It focuses on the aspects of time and memory in relation to spatial representations of movement measurements and critically discusses them from the perspective of the observing participant and the public exhibitions of scientific films. Departing from an audio-visual example, this paper is informed by a thick description of the philosophical implications and contemporary discourses surrounding the (...)
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  17. Wilhelm Blasius (1976). Problems of Life Research: Physiological Analyses and Phenomenological Interpretations. Springer-Verlag.score: 54.0
     
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  18. Theodore James Tracy (1969). Physiological Theory and the Doctrine of the Mean in Plato and Aristotle. The Hague, Mouton.score: 54.0
  19. John Sutton (1998). Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    Philosophy and Memory Traces defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are 'stored' only superpositionally, and reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models, argues John Sutton, depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory traces. Both raise urgent issues about (...)
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  20. Silvia A. Bunge & Jonathan D. Wallis (eds.) (2008). Neuroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    euroscience of Rule-Guided Behavior brings together, for the first time, the experiments and theories that have created the new science of rules. Rules are central to human behavior, but until now the field of neuroscience lacked a synthetic approach to understanding them. How are rules learned, retrieved from memory, maintained in consciousness and implemented? How are they used to solve problems and select among actions and activities? How are the various levels of rules represented in the brain, ranging from simple (...)
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  21. Daniel Steel (2008). Across the Boundaries: Extrapolation in Biology and Social Science. Oxford University Press.score: 48.0
    Inferences like these are known as extrapolations.
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  22. Mark B. Adams (2000). Last Judgment: The Visionary Biology of J. B. S. Haldane. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):457 - 491.score: 48.0
    This paper seeks to reinterpret the life and work of J. B. S. Haldane by focusing on an illuminating but largely ignored essay he published in 1927, "The Last Judgment" -- the sequel to his better known work, "Daedalus" (1924). This astonishing essay expresses a vision of the human future over the next 40,000,000 years, one that revises and updates Wellsian futurism with the long range implications of the "new biology" for human destiny. That vision served as a kind of (...)
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  23. Tamás Demeter (2012). The Anatomy and Physiology of Mind: Hume's Vitalistic Account. In H. F. J. Horstmanshoff, H. King & C. Zittel (eds.), Blood, Sweat and Tears: The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Brill.score: 48.0
    In this paper I challenge the widely held view which associates Hume’s philosophy with mechanical philosophies of nature and particularly with Newton. This view presents Hume’s account of the human mind as passive receiver of impressions which bring into motion, from the outside, a mental machinery whose functioning is described in terms of mechanical causal principles. Instead, I propose an interpretation which suggests that for Hume the human mind is composed of faculties that can be characterized by their active (...)
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  24. Bruce J. West (2007). Where Medicine Went Wrong: Rediscovering the Path to Complexity. World Scientific.score: 48.0
    Where Medicine Went Wrong explores how the idea of an average value has been misapplied to medical phenomena, distorted understanding and lead to flawed medical ...
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  25. Eva Neu, Michael Ch Michailov & Ursula Welscher (2008). Anthropology and Philosophy in Agenda 21 of UNO. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 37:195-202.score: 48.0
    Agenda 21 of United Nations demands better situation of ecology, economy, health, etc. in all countries. An evaluation of scientific contributions in international congresses of fundamental anthropological sciences (philosophy, psychology, psychosomatics, physiology, genito-urology, radio-oncology, etc.) demonstratesevidence of large discrepancies in the participation not only of developing and industrial countries, but also between the last ones themselves. Low degree of research and education leads to low degree of economy, health, ecology, etc. [Lit.: Neu, Michailov et al.: Physiology in (...)
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  26. Russ McBride (2012). A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    A Framework for Error Correction Under Prediction.
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  27. J. M. Rist (1987). Pseudo-Ammonius and the Soul/Body Problem in Some Platonic Texts of Late Antiquity. American Journal of Philology 109 (3):402-415.score: 48.0
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  28. Ash Gobar (1968). Philosophic Foundations Of Genetic Psychology And Gestalt Psychology. Martinus Nilboff.score: 48.0
     
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  29. la Mettrie & Julien Offray (1960). L'homme Machine: A Study in the Origins of an Idea. Princeton University Press.score: 48.0
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  30. A. N. Medeli͡anovskiĭ (2004). Neobychnye Vozmozhnosti Cheloveka I Teorii͡a Vlasti: Metody I Priemy Ispolʹzovanii͡a Bioėnergetiki, Vzaimodeĭstvie Cheloveka I Vselennoĭ, Strategii͡a Vlasti I Zakony Prirody. Aĭris-Press.score: 48.0
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  31. Randolph M. Nesse (1996). Evolution and Healing: The New Science of Darwinian Medicine. Phoenix.score: 48.0
    The first ever description of how evolutionary principles can be applied to questions of health and sickness.
     
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  32. Chris Nunn (2005). De La Mettrie's Ghost: The Story of Decisions. Macmillan.score: 48.0
    This book is about how we make choices. It is a compelling analysis of the nature of free will, drawing together evidence from chemistry, literature, politics, history and beyond. Psychiatrist Chris Nunn elegantly explores the revolutions in medicine, genetics, bioethics and neuroscience spurred by Julien de la Mettrie's 300-year-old tract Man the Machine . Nunn concludes that a mechanistic view of the human brain, though once fruitful, is now moribund. He proposes a powerful alternative: that stories, recorded in our memories (...)
     
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  33. M. Segala (2000). [Animal electricity, animal magnetism, universal galvanism: in search of universal harmony between humanity and nature]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (1):71-84.score: 48.0
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  34. Mario von Cranach (1976). Methods Of Inference From Animal To Human Behaviour. The Hague: Mouton.score: 48.0
     
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  35. Elliott White (1992). The End of the Empty Organism: Neurobiology and the Sciences of Human Action. Praeger.score: 48.0
  36. Scott Edgar (2013). The Limits of Experience and Explanation: F. A. Lange and Ernst Mach on Things in Themselves. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):100-121.score: 42.0
    In the middle of the nineteenth century, advances in experimental psychology and the physiology of the sense organs inspired so-called "Back to Kant" Neo-Kantians to articulate robustly psychologistic visions of Kantian epistemology. But their accounts of the thing in itself were fraught with deep tension: they wanted to conceive of things in themselves as the causes of our sensations, while their own accounts of causal inference ruled that claim out. This paper diagnoses the source of that problem in views (...)
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  37. Uljana Feest (forthcoming). The Continuing Relevance of 19th-Century Philosophy of Psychology: Brentano and the Autonomy of Psychological Methods. In C. GalavottiM (ed.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Science, The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective 5. Springer.score: 42.0
    This paper provides an analysis of Franz Brentano’s thesis that psychology employs a distinctive method, which sets it apart from physiology. The aim of the paper is two-fold: First, I situate Brentano’s thesis (and the broader metaphysical system that underwrites it) within the context of specific debates about the nature and status of psychology, arguing that we regard him as engaging in a form of boundary work. Second, I explore the relevance of Brentano’s considerations to more recent debates about (...)
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  38. John Sutton (1998). Preface to Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. In [Book Chapter].score: 42.0
    Philosophy and Memory Traces, the book to which this is the preface, defends two theories of autobiographical memory. One is a bewildering historical view of memories as dynamic patterns in fleeting animal spirits, nervous fluids which rummaged through the pores of brain and body. The other is new connectionism, in which memories are ‘stored’ only superpositionally, and are reconstructed rather than reproduced. Both models depart from static archival metaphors by employing distributed representation, which brings interference and confusion between memory (...)
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  39. Qiu Renzong (1982). Philosophy of Medicine in China (1930–1980). Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (1):35-73.score: 42.0
    This is a review of the literature in the philosophy of medicine published in China from 1930 to 1980. The topics dealt with include the relationship between medicine and philosophy, the basic concepts of medicine, etiology and causality, the bearing of psychology on physiology and pathology, epistemology in diagnostics, methodology of medical sciences, philosophical and methological problems in traditional Chinese medicine, philosophical problems in health policy, and medical ethics.
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  40. Cunshan Li (2008). A Differentiation of the Meaning of “ Qi ” on Several Levels. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (2):194-212.score: 42.0
    In Chinese philosophy, although the concept of qi has numerous meanings, it is not completely without order or chaotic. Generally speaking, qi has several different levels of meanings, such as in philosophy, physics, physiology, psychology, ethics, and so on. On the philosophical level, qi is similar to air, and it is essentially similar to the matter-energy or field in physics, which refers to the origin or an element of all things in the world. It is from this (...)
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  41. Jean Gayon, Philosophy of Biology: An Historico-Critical Characterization.score: 42.0
    Literally speaking, "Philosophy of biology" is a rather old expression. William Whewell coined it in 1840, at the very time he introduced the expression "philosophy of science". Whewell was fond of creating neologisms, like Auguste Comte, his French counterpart in the field of the philosophical reflection about science. Historians of science know that a few years earlier, in 1834, Whewell had generated a small scandal when he proposed the word "scientist" as a general term by which "the students (...)
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  42. John J. Compton (1988). Phenomenology and the Philosophy of Nature. Man and World 21 (1):65-89.score: 42.0
    Despite Platonism's unquestioned claim to being one of the most influential movements in the history of philosophy, for a long time the conventional wisdom was that Platonists of late antiquity, or Neoplatonists, were so focused on otherworldly metaphysics that they simply neglected any serious study of the sensible world, which after all is 'merely' an image of the intelligible world. Only recently has this conventional wisdom begun to be dispelled. In fact, it is precisely because these thinkers did see (...)
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  43. Jill Marsden (2002). After Nietzsche: Notes Towards a Philosophy of Ecstasy. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 42.0
    This book explores the imaginative possibilities for philosophy created by Nietzsche's sustained reflection on the phenomenon of ecstasy. From The Birth of Tragedy to his experimental "physiology of art," Nietzsche examines the aesthetic, erotic, and sacred dimensions of rapture, hinting at how an ecstatic philosophy is realized in his elusive doctrine of Eternal Return. Jill Marsden pursues the implications of this legacy for contemporary Continental thought via analyses of such voyages in ecstasy as Kant, Schopenhauer, Schreber, and (...)
     
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  44. Carlo Ierna (2014). La Science de la Conscience Selon Brentano. In C.-E. Niveleau (ed.), Vers une philosophie scientifique. Le programme de Brentano. Demopolis.score: 38.0
    Franz Brentano’s 1874 Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint presents us with a framework and methodology for performing scientific research in psychology. Moreover, this project provides the foundation for the more ambitious ideal of the renewal of philosophy as a science, which had been Brentano’s aim ever since defending his habilitation thesis that “the true method of philosophy is none other than that of the natural sciences”. Brentano therefore needs to carefully articulate the precise position and role of his (...)
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  45. Charles T. Wolfe (2010). Embodied Empiricism. In Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as object and instrument of knowledge. Springer. 1--6.score: 36.0
    This is the introduction to a collection of essays on 'embodied empiricism' in early modern philosophy and the life sciences - papers on Harvey, Glisson, Locke, Hume, Bonnet, Lamarck, on anatomy and physiology, on medicine and natural history, etc.
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  46. Mark Crooks (2003). Phenomenology in Absentia: Dennett's Philosophy of Mind. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 23 (2):102-148.score: 36.0
    : Daniel Dennett's philosophical abolition of mind is examined with reference to its methodology, intent, philosophic origins, and internal consistency. His treatment of the contents of perception and introspection is shown to be derivative from realist reductionist misinterpretations of physics, physiology, and phenomenology of perception. In order to rectify inconsistencies of that realistic paradigm devolved from psycho-neural identity theory of mid-twentieth century, Dennett radicalizes its logic and redefines even veridical phenomenology of exteroception to be "illusory." This measure in extremis (...)
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  47. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1998/2008). Twilight of the Idols, or, How to Philosophize with a Hammer. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    Twilight of the Idols. Nietzsche's own unabashed appraisal of the last work intended to serve as a short introduction to the whole of his philosophy, and the most synoptic of all his books, bristles with a register of vocabulary derived from physiology, pathology, symptomatalogy and medicine. This new translation is supplemented by an introduction and extensive notes, which provide close analysis of a highly condensed work.
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  48. Joseph S. Alter (2004). Yoga in Modern India: The Body Between Science and Philosophy. Princeton University Press.score: 36.0
    Yoga has come to be an icon of Indian culture and civilization, and it is widely regarded as being timeless and unchanging. Based on extensive ethnographic research and an analysis of both ancient and modern texts, Yoga in Modern India challenges this popular view by examining the history of yoga, focusing on its emergence in modern India and its dramatically changing form and significance in the twentieth century. Joseph Alter argues that yoga's transformation into a popular activity idolized for its (...)
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  49. Thomas Sturm (2009). Kant Und Die Wissenschaften Vom Menschen. Mentis.score: 36.0
    This book explores Kant's philosophy of the human sciences, their status, their relations and prospects. Contrary to widespread belief, he is not dogmatic about the question of whether these disciplines are proper sciences. Instead, this depends on whether we can rationally adjust assumptions about the methods, goals, and subject matter of these disciplines - and this has to be done alongside of ongoing research. Kant applies these ideas especially in lectures on "pragmatic antropology" given from 1772-1796. In doing so, (...)
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  50. K. A. Mohyeldin Said (ed.) (1990). Modelling the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    This collection by a distinguished group of philosophers, psychologists, and physiologists reflects an interdisciplinary approach to the central question of cognitive science: how do we model the mind? Among the topics explored are the relationships (theoretical, reductive, and explanatory) between philosophy, psychology, computer science, and physiology; what should be asked of models in science generally, and in cognitive science in particular; whether theoretical models must make essential reference to objects in the environment; whether there are human competences that (...)
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