4 found
Sort by:
  1. Pier Jaarsma (2014). Cultivation of Empathy in Individuals with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder. Ethics and Education 8 (3):290-300.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin (2013). Human Capabilities, Mild Autism, Deafness and the Morality of Embryo Selection. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):817-824.
    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger’s disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Pier Jaarsma, Petra Gelhaus & Stellan Welin (2012). Living the Categorical Imperative: Autistic Perspectives on Lying and Truth Telling–Between Kant and Care Ethics. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):271-277.
    Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be ‘attractively morally innocent’ and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin (2012). Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 20 (1):20-30.
    Neurodiversity has remained a controversial concept over the last decade. In its broadest sense the concept of neurodiversity regards atypical neurological development as a normal human difference. The neurodiversity claim contains at least two different aspects. The first aspect is that autism, among other neurological conditions, is first and foremost a natural variation. The other aspect is about conferring rights and in particular value to the neurodiversity condition, demanding recognition and acceptance. Autism can be seen as a natural variation on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation