6 found
Sort by:
  1. Pierre Grenon & Barry Smith (2011). Foundations of an Ontology of Philosophy. Synthese 182 (2):185-204.
    We describe an ontology of philosophy that is designed to aid navigation through philosophical literature, including literature in the form of encyclopedia articles and textbooks and in both printed and digital forms. The ontology is designed also to serve integration and structuring of data pertaining to the philosophical literature, and in the long term also to support reasoning about the provenance and contents of such literature, by providing a representation of the philosophical domain that is oriented around what philosophical literature (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Pierre Grenon (2008). Persistence and Ontological Pluralism. In Christian Kanzian (ed.), Persistence. ontos.
    We aim to provide the ontological grounds for an adequate account of persistence. We defend a perspectivalist, or moderate pluralist, position, according to which some aspects of reality can be accounted for in ontological terms only via partial and mutually complementary ontologies, each one of which captures some relevant aspect of reality. Our thesis here is that this is precisely the sort of ontological account that is needed for the understanding of persistence, specifically an account involving two independent ontologies, one (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Pierre Grenon & Barry Smith (2004). SNAP and SPAN: Towards Dynamic Spatial Ontology. Spatial Cognition and Computation 4 (1):69–103.
    We propose a modular ontology of the dynamic features of reality. This amounts, on the one hand, to a purely spatial ontology supporting snapshot views of the world at successive instants of time and, on the other hand, to a purely spatiotemporal ontology of change and process. We argue that dynamic spatial ontology must combine these two distinct types of inventory of the entities and relationships in reality, and we provide characterizations of spatiotemporal reasoning in the light of the interconnections (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Fabian Neuhaus, Pierre Grenon & Barry Smith (2004). A Formal Theory of Substances, Qualities, and Universals. In Achille Varzi & Laure Vieu (eds.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Proceedings of the Third International Conference. IOS Press.
    One of the tasks of ontology in information science is to support the classification of entities according to their kinds and qualities. We hold that to realize this task as far as entities such as material objects are concerned we need to distinguish four kinds of entities: substance particulars, quality particulars, substance universals, and quality universals. These form, so to speak, an ontological square. We present a formal theory of classification based on this idea, including both a semantics for the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Barry Smith & Pierre Grenon (2004). The Cornucopia of Formal-Ontological Relations. Dialectica 58 (3):279–296.
    The paper presents a new method for generating typologies of formal-ontological relations. The guiding idea is that formal relations are those sorts of relations which hold between entities which are constituents of distinct ontologies. We provide examples of ontologies (in the spirit of Zemach’s classic “Four Ontologies” of 1970), and show how these can be used to give a rich typology of formal relations in a way which also throws light on the opposition between threeand four-dimensionalism.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Barry Smith, Pierre Grenon & Louis Goldberg (2004). Biodynamic Ontology: Applying BFO in the Biomedical Domain. Studies in Health and Technology Informatics 102:20–38.
    Current approaches to formal representation in biomedicine are characterized by their focus on either the static or the dynamic aspects of biological reality. We here outline a theory that combines both perspectives and at the same time tackles the by no means trivial issue of their coherent integration. Our position is that a good ontology must be capable of accounting for reality both synchronically (as it exists at a time) and diachronically (as it unfolds through time), but that these are (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation