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Profile: Piers Howard Guy Stephens (University of Georgia)
  1.  3
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2016). Comments on Brook Muller's "The Machine Is a Watershed for Living In ". The Pluralist 11 (1):101-109.
    in a stimulating and rich address, Brook Muller diagnoses some of the problems and challenges that our ecological crises bring to contemporary architecture, and attempts to break out of the conceptual straitjacket of modernism that he sees as contributing to the difficulty of producing original, promising solutions. In particular, he draws attention to the hugely pervasive role of Le Corbusier’s idea of the house as a machine for living in: here, he suggests, Le Corbusier’s enduring influence is manifested not only (...)
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  2.  4
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2015). On the Nature of “Nature”. Environmental Ethics 37 (3):359-376.
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  3.  6
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2015). Environmental Ethics: An Overview for the Twenty-First Century by Robin Attfield. Ethics and the Environment 20 (2):104-111.
    Though broadly philosophical reflections on nature and our place within it can be tracked to antiquity, the development of the field of environmental ethics as a distinct sub-discipline within contemporary academic philosophy has a far shorter history. Its landmark moments include the 1968 publication of Lynn White Jr’s influential critique of Christianity’s environmental record “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis,” J. Baird Callicott’s teaching of the world’s first course in environmental ethics in 1971 at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, (...)
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  4.  6
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2009). Toward a Jamesian Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):227-244.
    William James’s radical empiricism and pragmatism constitutes a philosophy that can reconcile the split between intrinsic value theorists, who stress the development and relevance of theoretical axiology, and pragmatists who have favored a more direct emphasis on environmental policy and application. By distinguishing James’s emphasis on direct personal experience from John Dewey’s more socialized approach, James’s distinctive emphasis on the transformative possibilities of pure experience and his links to romantic sensibility enable us to articulate and validate the noninstrumental aspects of (...)
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  5.  21
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2009). Plumwood, Property, Selfhood and Sustainability. Ethics and the Environment 14 (2):pp. 57-73.
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  6.  16
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2009). Toward a Jamesian Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):227-244.
    William James’s radical empiricism and pragmatism constitutes a philosophy that can reconcile the split between intrinsic value theorists, who stress the development and relevance of theoretical axiology, and pragmatists who have favored a more direct emphasis on environmental policy and application. By distinguishing James’s emphasis on direct personal experience from John Dewey’s more socialized approach, James’s distinctive emphasis on the transformative possibilities of pure experience and his links to romantic sensibility enable us to articulate and validate the noninstrumental aspects of (...)
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  7.  4
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2014). Review ofPragmatic Environmentalism: Towards a Rhetoric of Eco-Justiceby Shane J. Ralston. Ethics and the Environment 19 (1):123-131.
    But no word could protect the doctrine from critics so blind to the nature of the enquiry that, when Dr. Schiller speaks of ideas ‘working’ well, the only thing they think of is their immediate workings in the physical environment, their enabling us to make money, or gain some similar ‘practical’ advantage. Ideas do work thus, of course, immediately or remotely; but they work indefinitely inside the mental world also.Thus wrote an exasperated William James in The Meaning of Truth in (...)
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  8.  1
    Piers H. G. Stephens (2013). Ben A. Minteer. Refounding Environmental Ethics: Pragmatism, Principle, and Practice. Environmental Ethics 35 (3):371-374.
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  9. Piers H. G. Stephens (2015). Review of Gregory E. Kaebnick, Humans in Nature: The World as We Find It and the World as We Create It. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 24 (3):428-430.
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  10. Piers H. G. Stephens (2016). Review of George Wuerthner, Eileen Crist and Tom Butler , Keeping the Wild: Against the Domestication of Earth. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 25 (1):121-123.
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  11. Piers H. G. Stephens (2015). Review of J. Baird Callicott, Thinking Like A Planet: The Land Ethic and the Earth Ethic. [REVIEW] Environmental Values 24 (4):553-555.
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