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Steven Pinker [107]S. Pinker [7]Stephen Pinker [1]
  1.  6
    Steven Pinker (1998). How the Mind Works. Norton.
    A provocative assessment of human thought and behavior, reissued with a new afterword, explores a range of conundrums from the ability of the mind to perceive three dimensions to the nature of consciousness, in an account that draws on ...
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  2. Steven Pinker (1995). The Language Instinct. Harper Perennial.
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  3. Steven Pinker & Alan Prince (1988). On Language and Connectionism. Cognition 28 (1-2):73-193.
  4. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Selection and Natural Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-784.
     
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  5. Steven Pinker & Paul Bloom (1990). Natural Language and Natural Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):707-27.
    Many people have argued that the evolution of the human language faculty cannot be explained by Darwinian natural selection. Chomsky and Gould have suggested that language may have evolved as the by-product of selection for other abilities or as a consequence of as-yet unknown laws of growth and form. Others have argued that a biological specialization for grammar is incompatible with every tenet of Darwinian theory – that it shows no genetic variation, could not exist in any intermediate forms, confers (...)
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  6. Steven Pinker (2004). The Blank Slate. The Modern Denial of Human Nature. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 66 (4):765-767.
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  7.  15
    Stephen M. Kosslyn, Steven Pinker, Sophie Schwartz & G. Smith (1979). On the Demystification of Mental Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):535-81.
    What might a theory of mental imagery look like, and how might one begin formulating such a theory? These are the central questions addressed in the present paper. The first section outlines the general research direction taken here and provides an overview of the empirical foundations of our theory of image representation and processing. Four issues are considered in succession, and the relevant results of experiments are presented and discussed. The second section begins with a discussion of the proper form (...)
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  8.  54
    Steven Pinker (2005). The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It? Cognition 95 (2):201-236.
    We examine the question of which aspects of language are uniquely human and uniquely linguistic in light of recent suggestions by Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch that the only such aspect is syntactic recursion, the rest of language being either specific to humans but not to language (e.g. words and concepts) or not specific to humans (e.g. speech perception). We find the hypothesis problematic. It ignores the many aspects of grammar that are not recursive, such as phonology, morphology, (...)
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  9.  1
    Steven Pinker (1979). Formal Models of Language Learning. Cognition 7 (3):217-283.
  10.  9
    Jane Grimshaw & Steven Pinker (1989). Positive and Negative Evidence in Language Acquistion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):341.
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  11. Steven Pinker (2005). So How Does the Mind Work? Mind and Language 20 (1):1-38.
    In my book How the Mind Works, I defended the theory that the human mind is a naturally selected system of organs of computation. Jerry Fodor claims that 'the mind doesn't work that way'(in a book with that title) because (1) Turing Machines cannot duplicate humans' ability to perform abduction (inference to the best explanation); (2) though a massively modular system could succeed at abduction, such a system is implausible on other grounds; and (3) evolution adds nothing to our understanding (...)
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  12.  14
    Steven Pinker & Michael Ullman (2002). The Past and Future of the Past Tense. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by a (...)
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  13.  27
    Steven Pinker (1987). Productivity and Constraints in the Acquisition of the Passive. Cognition 26 (3):195-267.
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  14. Ray Jackendoff & Steven Pinker (2005). The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It? Cognition 95 (2):201-236.
    We examine the question of which aspects of language are uniquely human and uniquely linguistic in light of recent suggestions by Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch that the only such aspect is syntactic recursion, the rest of language being either specific to humans but not to language (e.g. words and concepts) or not specific to humans (e.g. speech perception). We find the hypothesis problematic. It ignores the many aspects of grammar that are not recursive, such as phonology, morphology, (...)
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  15. Steven Pinker, The Stupidity of Dignity.
    Many people are vaguely disquieted by developments (real or imagined) that could alter minds and bodies in novel ways. Romantics and Greens tend to idealize the natural and demonize technology. Traditionalists and conservatives by temperament distrust radical change. Egalitarians worry about an arms race in enhancement techniques. And anyone is likely to have a "yuck" response when contemplating unprecedented manipulations of our biology. The President's Council has become a forum for the airing of this disquiet, and the concept of "dignity" (...)
     
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  16. Steven Pinker, Words and Rules.
    The vast expressive power of language is made possible by two principles: the arbitrary soundmeaning pairing underlying words, and the discrete combinatorial system underlying grammar. These principles implicate distinct cognitive mechanisms: associative memory and symbolmanipulating rules. The distinction may be seen in the difference between regular inflection (e.g., walk-walked), which is productive and open-ended and hence implicates a rule, and irregular inflection (e.g., come-came, which is idiosyncratic and closed and hence implicates individually memorized words. Nonetheless, two very different theories have (...)
     
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  17.  4
    Steven Pinker (1984). Visual Cognition: An Introduction. Cognition 18 (1-3):1-63.
  18.  32
    Steven Pinker (2007). Żegnaj, Przemocy. Gazeta Wyborcza 157:13.
    Od wieków przemocy jest coraz mniej. Prawdopodobnie żyjemy dziś w najspokojniejszej epoce w dziejach człowieka na ziemi.
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  19.  9
    John J. Kim, Steven Pinker, Alan Prince & Sandeep Prasada (1991). Why No Mere Mortal Has Ever Flown Out to Center Field. Cognitive Science 15 (2):173-218.
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  20. Steven Pinker, The Cognitive Niche: Coevolution of Intelligence, Sociality, and Language.
    Although Darwin insisted that human intelligence could be fully explained by the theory of evolution, the codiscoverer of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace, claimed that abstract intelligence was of no use to ancestral humans and could only be explained by intelligent design. Wallace’s apparent paradox can be dissolved with two hypotheses about human cognition. One is that intelligence is an adaptation to a knowledge-using, socially interdependent lifestyle, the “cognitive niche.” This embraces the ability to overcome the evolutionary fixed defenses of (...)
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  21. Steven Pinker (2004). Why Nature & Nurture Won't Go Away. Daedalus.
  22.  12
    Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff (2009). The Reality of a Universal Language Faculty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):465-466.
    While endorsing Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) call for rigorous documentation of variation, we defend the idea of Universal Grammar as a toolkit of language acquisition mechanisms. The authors exaggerate diversity by ignoring the space of conceivable but nonexistent languages, trivializing major design universals, conflating quantitative with qualitative variation, and assuming that the utility of a linguistic feature suffices to explain how children acquire it.
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  23.  92
    Steven Pinker (2005). The Nature of the Language Faculty and its Implications for Evolution of Language (Reply to Fitch, Hauser, and Chomsky). Cognition 97 (2):211-225.
    In a continuation of the conversation with Fitch, Chomsky, and Hauser on the evolution of language, we examine their defense of the claim that the uniquely human, language-specific part of the language faculty (the “narrow language faculty”) consists only of recursion, and that this part cannot be considered an adaptation to communication. We argue that their characterization of the narrow language faculty is problematic for many reasons, including its dichotomization of cognitive capacities (...)
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  24.  4
    Samuel Jay Keyser & Steven Pinker (1980). Direct Vs. Representational Views of Cognition: A Parallel Between Vision and Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):389.
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  25.  5
    Steven Pinker (2015). Political Bias, Explanatory Depth, and Narratives of Progress. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  26. Steven Pinker (2005). A Reply to Jerry Fodor on How the Mind Works. Mind and Language 20 (1):33-38.
  27. Steven Pinker, The Logic of Indirect Speech.
    When people speak, they often insinuate their intent indirectly rather than stating it as a bald proposition. Examples include sexual come-ons, veiled threats, polite requests, and concealed bribes. We propose a three-part theory of indirect speech, based on the idea that human communication involves a mixture of cooperation and conflict. First, indirect requests allow for plausible deniability, in which a cooperative listener can accept the request, but an uncooperative one cannot react adversarially to it. This intuition is sup- ported by (...)
     
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  28. Steven Pinker, Language as an Adaptation to the Cognitive Niche.
    Th is chapter outlines the theory (fi rst explicitly defended by Pinker and Bloom 1990), that the human language faculty is a complex biological adaptation that evolved by natural selection for communication in a knowledgeusing, socially interdependent lifestyle. Th..
     
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  29.  13
    Steven Pinker & Michael Ullman (2002). Combination and Structure, Not Gradedness, is the Issue. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):472-474.
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  30.  29
    Steven Pinker (2002). Steven Pinker. Cognitive Science 1991 (1996).
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  31. Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff (forthcoming). The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It? Ms. Harvard University and Brandeis University. Cognition.
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  32. James J. Lee & Steven Pinker, Rationales for Indirect Speech: The Theory of the Strategic Speaker.
    Speakers often do not state requests directly but employ innuendos such as Would you like to see my etchings? Though such indirectness seems puzzlingly inefficient, it can be explained by a theory of the strategic speaker, who seeks plausible deniability when he or she is uncertain of whether the hearer is cooperative or antagonistic. A paradigm case is bribing a policeman who may be corrupt or honest: A veiled bribe may be accepted by the former and ignored by the latter. (...)
     
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  33.  4
    Ronald A. Finks, Steven Pinker & Martha J. Farah (1989). Reinterpreting Visual Patterns in Mental Imagery. Cognitive Science 13 (1):51-78.
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  34. Steven Pinker, Life in the Fourth Millennium.
    People living at the start of the third millennium enjoy a world that would have been inconceivable to our ancestors living in the 100 millennia that our species has existed. Ignorance and myth have given way to an extraordinarily detailed understanding of life, matter and the universe. Slavery, despotism, blood feuds and patriarchy have vanished from vast expanses of the planet, driven out by unprecedented concepts of universal human rights and the rule of law. Technology has shrunk the globe and (...)
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  35. Steven Pinker, How to Think About the Mind.
    Sept. 27 issue - Every evening our eyes tell us that the sun sets, while we know that, in fact, the Earth is turning us away from it. Astronomy taught us centuries ago that common sense is not a reliable guide to reality. Today it is neuroscience that is forcing us to readjust our intuitions. People naturally believe in the Ghost in the Machine: that we have bodies made of matter and spirits made of an ethereal something. Yes, people acknowledge (...)
     
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  36. Steven Pinker, Could a Computer Ever Be Conscious?
     
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  37. Steven Pinker, Block That Metaphor!
    he field of linguistics has exported a number of big ideas to the world. They include the evolution of languages as an inspiration to Darwin for the evolution of species; the analysis of contrasting sounds as an inspiration for structuralism in literary theory and anthropology; the Whorfian hypothesis that language shapes thought; and Chomsky's theory of deep structure and universal grammar. Even by these standards, George Lakoff's theory of conceptual metaphor is a lollapalooza. If Lakoff is right, his theory can (...)
     
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  38. Steven Pinker, The Evolutionary Social Psychology of Off-Record Indirect Speech Acts.
    This paper proposes a new analysis of indirect speech in the framework of game theory, social psychology, and evolutionary psychology. It builds on the theory of Grice, which tries to ground indirect speech in pure rationality (the demands of e‰cient communication between two cooperating agents) and on the Politeness Theory of Brown and Levinson, who proposed that people cooperate not just in exchanging data but in saving face (both the speaker’s and the hearer’s). I suggest that these theories need to (...)
     
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  39.  7
    Heather K. J. van der Lely & Steven Pinker (2014). The Biological Basis of Language: Insight From Developmental Grammatical Impairments. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (11):586-595.
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  40.  5
    Steven Pinker & Michael T. Ullman (2003). Beyond One Model Per Phenomenon. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):108-109.
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  41.  18
    Steven Pinker (2007). Toward a Consilient Study of Literature. Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):162-178.
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  42.  23
    Steven Pinker, Evolutionary Psychology: An Exchange.
    volutionary psychology is the attempt to understand our mental faculties in light of the evolutionary processes that shaped them. Stephen Jay Gould [NYR, June 12 and June 26] calls its ideas and their proponents "foolish," "fatuous," "pathetic," "egregiously simplistic," and some twenty-five synonyms for "fanatical." Such language is not just discourteous; it is misguided, for the ideas of evolutionary psychology are not as stupid as Gould makes them out to be. Indeed, they are nothing like what Gould makes them out (...)
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  43. Steven Pinker, A History of Violence.
    n sixteenth-century Paris, a popular form of entertainment was cat-burning, in which a cat was hoisted in a sling on a stage and slowly lowered into a fire. According to historian Norman Davies, "[T]he spectators, including kings and According to historian Norman Davies, "[T]he spectators, including kings and queens, shrieked with laughter as the animals, howling with pain, were singed, roasted, and finally carbonized." Today, such sadism would be unthinkable in most of the world. This change in sensibilities is just (...)
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  44.  6
    Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff (2005). What's Special About the Human Language Faculty? Cognition 95 (2).
  45. Steven Pinker, In Defense of Dangerous Ideas In Every Age, Taboo Questions Raise Our Blood Pressure and Threaten Moral Panic. But We Cannot Be Afraid to Answer Them.
    Tell us what you think This essay was first posted at Edge (www.edge.org) and is reprinted with permission. It is the Preface to the book 'What Is Your Dangerous Idea?: Today's Leading Thinkers on the Unthinkable,' published by HarperCollins. Write to controversy@suntimes.com..
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  46.  2
    S. Pinker & M. T. Ullman (2002). The Past-Tense Debate. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):456-463.
    What is the interaction between storage and computation in language processing? What is the psychological status of grammatical rules? What are the relative strengths of connectionist and symbolic models of cognition? How are the components of language implemented in the brain? The English past tense has served as an arena for debates on these issues. We defend the theory that irregular past-tense forms are stored in the lexicon, a division of declarative memory, whereas regular forms can be computed by a (...)
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  47. Steven Pinker (1986). Productivity and Conservatism in Language Acquisition. In William Demopoulos (ed.), Language Learning and Concept Acquisition. Ablex 54--79.
     
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  48. Steven Pinker, Grammar Puss.
     Language is a human instinct.   All societies have complex language, and everywhere the languages use the same kinds of grammatical machinery like nouns, verbs, auxiliaries, and agreement. All normal children develop language without conscious effort or formal lessons, and by the age of three they speak in  fluent  grammatical  sentences, outperforming the most sophisticated computers. Brain damage or congenital conditions can make a person a linguistic savant while severely retarded, or unable to speak normally (...)
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  49. Steven Pinker, The Mystery of Consciousness.
    The young women had survived the car crash, after a fashion. In the five months since parts of her brain had been crushed, she could open her eyes but didn't respond to sights, sounds or jabs. In the jargon of neurology, she was judged to be in a persistent vegetative state. In crueler everyday language, she was a vegetable.
     
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  50.  13
    Joseph Shimron, Iris Berent & Stephen Pinker (1999). Default Nominal Inflection in Hebrew: Evidence for Mental Variables. Cognition 72 (1):1-44.
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