Search results for 'Plagiarism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Tracey Bretag & Saadia Mahmud (2009). Self-Plagiarism or Appropriate Textual Re-Use? Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):193-205.score: 24.0
    Self-plagiarism requires clear definition within an environment that places integrity at the heart of the research enterprise. This paper explores the whole notion of self-plagiarism by academics and distinguishes between appropriate and inappropriate textual re-use in academic publications, while considering research on other forms of plagiarism such as student plagiarism. Based on the practical experience of the authors in identifying academics’ self-plagiarism using both electronic detection and manual analysis, a simple model is proposed for identifying (...)
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  2. Rubén Comas-Forgas & Jaume Sureda-Negre (2010). Academic Plagiarism: Explanatory Factors From Students' Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):217-232.score: 24.0
    The study of academic plagiarism among university students is at an embryonic stage in Spain and in the other Spanish-speaking countries. This article reports the results of a research, carried out in a medium-sized Spanish university, based on a double method approach—quantitative and qualitative—concerning the factors associated with academic plagiarism from the students’ perspective. The main explanatory factors of the phenomenon, according to the results obtained, are: a) aspects and behaviour of students (bad time management, personal shortcomings when (...)
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  3. Ksenija Baždarić, Lidija Bilić-Zulle, Gordana Brumini & Mladen Petrovečki (2012). Prevalence of Plagiarism in Recent Submissions to the Croatian Medical Journal. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):223-239.score: 24.0
    To assess the prevalence of plagiarism in manuscripts submitted for publication in the Croatian Medical Journal (CMJ). All manuscripts submitted in 2009–2010 were analyzed using plagiarism detection software: eTBLAST , CrossCheck, and WCopyfind . Plagiarism was suspected in manuscripts with more than 10% of the text derived from other sources. These manuscripts were checked against the Déjà vu database and manually verified by investigators. Of 754 submitted manuscripts, 105 (14%) were identified by the software as suspicious of (...)
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  4. Neil Granitz & Dana Loewy (2007). Applying Ethical Theories: Interpreting and Responding to Student Plagiarism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):293 - 306.score: 24.0
    Given the tremendous proliferation of student plagiarism involving the Internet, the purpose of this study is to determine which theory of ethical reasoning students invoke when defending their transgressions: deontology, utilitarianism, rational self-interest, Machiavellianism, cultural relativism, or situational ethics. Understanding which theory of ethical reasoning students employ is critical, as preemptive steps can be taken by faculty to counteract this reasoning and prevent plagiarism. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that unethical behavior in school can lead to unethical behavior (...)
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  5. Tobenna D. Anekwe (2009). Profits and Plagiarism: The Case of Medical Ghostwriting. Bioethics 24 (6):267-272.score: 24.0
    This paper focuses on medical ghostwriting in the United States. I argue that medical ghostwriting often involves plagiarism and, in those cases, can be treated as an act of research misconduct by both the federal government and research institutions. I also propose several anti-ghostwriting measures, including: 1) journals should implement guarantor policies so that researchers may be better held accountable for their work; 2) research institutions and the federal government should explicitly prohibit medical ghostwriting and outline appropriate penalties; and (...)
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  6. Jaume Sureda-Negre (2010). Academic Plagiarism: Explanatory Factors From Students' Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (3):217-232.score: 24.0
    The study of academic plagiarism among university students is at an embryonic stage in Spain and in the other Spanish-speaking countries. This article reports the results of a research, carried out in a medium-sized Spanish university, based on a double method approach—quantitative and qualitative—concerning the factors associated with academic plagiarism from the students’ perspective. The main explanatory factors of the phenomenon, according to the results obtained, are: a) aspects and behaviour of students (bad time management, personal shortcomings when (...)
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  7. Cynthia Townley & Mitch Parsell (2004). Technology and Academic Virtue: Student Plagiarism Through the Looking Glass. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 6 (4):271-277.score: 24.0
    Plagiarism is the misuse of and failure to acknowledge source materials. This paper questions common responses to the apparent increase in plagiarism by students. Internet plagiarism occurs in a context – using the Internet as an information tool – where the relevant norms are far from obvious and models of virtue are difficult to identify and perhaps impossible to find. Ethical responses to the pervasiveness of Internet-enhanced plagiarism require a reorientation of perspective on both plagiarism (...)
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  8. David Carl Ison (2012). Plagiarism Among Dissertations: Prevalence at Online Institutions. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (3):227-236.score: 24.0
    The current research literature has claimed that plagiarism is a significant problem in postsecondary education. Unfortunately, these claims are primarily supported by self-report data from students. In fact little research has been done to quantify the prevalence of plagiarism particularly at the advanced graduate education level. Further, few studies exist on online education even though this is a rapidly growing sector of higher education. This descriptive study quantified the amount of plagiarism that existed among 100 doctoral dissertations (...)
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  9. Niall Hayes & Lucas Introna (2005). Systems for the Production of Plagiarists? The Implications Arising From the Use of Plagiarism Detection Systems in UK Universities for Asian Learners. Journal of Academic Ethics 3 (1):55-73.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that the inappropriate framing and implementation of plagiarism detection systems in UK universities can unwittingly construct international students as ‘plagiarists’. It argues that these systems are often implemented with inappropriate assumptions about plagiarism and the way in which new members of a community of practice develop the skills to become full members of that community. Drawing on the literature and some primary data it shows how expectations, norms and practices become translated and negotiated in such (...)
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  10. Sepehr Ghazinoory, Soroush Ghazinoori & Mandana Azadegan-Mehr (2011). Iranian Academia: Evolution After Revolution and Plagiarism as a Disorder. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):213-216.score: 24.0
    Recently, a few of scientific journals raise serious questions about scientific ethics and moral judgment of some of the Iranian government’s senior executives in their papers. Plagiarism, under any circumstances is not justified, and we do not intend to justify it in this note. However, we find it useful in understanding why otherwise respected, responsible individuals may engage in plagiarism by terse review of the history Iranian academia.
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  11. Carlos Cabral-Cardoso (2004). Ethical Misconduct in the Business School: A Case of Plagiarism That Turned Bitter. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):75-89.score: 24.0
    As a result of the public demand for higher ethical standards, business schools are increasingly taking ethical matters seriously. But their effort has concentrated on teaching business ethics and on students' ethical behavior. Business faculty, in contrast, has attracted much less attention. This paper explores the context and the implications of an alleged case of plagiarism in a master's dissertation submitted to a university lacking both an ethical code of conduct and a formalized procedure to deal with academic misconduct. (...)
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  12. Melinda Rosenberg (2011). Principled Autonomy and Plagiarism. Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):61-69.score: 24.0
    Every semester, professors in every discipline are burdened with the task of checking for plagiarized papers. Since plagiarism has become rampant in the university, it can be argued that devoting time to checking for plagiarism is nothing more than a fool’s errand. Students will continue to plagiarize regardless of the consequences. In this paper, I will argue that professors do have a categorically binding obligation to confirm whether papers have been plagiarized. I will use Onora O'Neill’s account of (...)
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  13. Colin Berry (2013). Metrics-Based Assessments of Research: Incentives for 'Institutional Plagiarism'? Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):337-340.score: 24.0
    The issue of plagiarism—claiming credit for work that is not one’s own, rightly, continues to cause concern in the academic community. An analysis is presented that shows the effects that may arise from metrics-based assessments of research, when credit for an author’s outputs (chiefly publications) is given to an institution that did not support the research but which subsequently employs the author. The incentives for what is termed here “institutional plagiarism” are demonstrated with reference to the UK Research (...)
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  14. Teressa L. Elliott, Linda M. Marquis & Catherine S. Neal (2013). Business Ethics Perspectives: Faculty Plagiarism and Fraud. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):91-99.score: 24.0
    Faculty plagiarism and fraud are widely documented occurrences but little analysis has been conducted. This article addresses the question of why faculty plagiarism and fraud occurs and suggests approaches on how to develop an environment where faculty misconduct is socially inappropriate. The authors review relevant literature, primarily in business ethics and student cheating, developing action steps that could be applied to higher education. Based upon research in these areas, the authors posit some actions that would be appropriate in (...)
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  15. Chun Hoo Quah, Natalie Stewart & Jason Wai Chow Lee (2012). Attitudes of Business Students' Toward Plagiarism. Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (3):185-199.score: 24.0
    This research examines the ethical orientations of students (ethical idealism, ethical relativism and Machiavellianism) towards their attitude to plagiarize. It also examines the moderating effect of religious orientation on the relationship of the independent variables toward students’ attitude towards plagiarism. Data was collected from 160 business diploma and undergraduate students from a local private college and a local public university in Malaysia. Results from the hierarchical regression analysis showed that ethical relativism and Machiavellianism had a positive relationship with students’ (...)
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  16. Yongyan Li (2013). Text-Based Plagiarism in Scientific Writing: What Chinese Supervisors Think About Copying and How to Reduce It in Students' Writing. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):569-583.score: 24.0
    Text-based plagiarism, or textual copying, typically in the form of replicating or patchwriting sentences in a row from sources, seems to be an issue of growing concern among scientific journal editors. Editors have emphasized that senior authors (typically supervisors of science students) should take the responsibility for educating novices against text-based plagiarism. To address a research gap in the literature as to how scientist supervisors perceive the issue of textual copying and what they do in educating their students, (...)
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  17. Liviu Andreescu (2013). Self-Plagiarism in Academic Publishing: The Anatomy of a Misnomer. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):775-797.score: 24.0
    The paper discusses self-plagiarism and associated practices in scholarly publishing. It approaches at some length the conceptual issues raised by the notion of self-plagiarism. It distinguishes among and then examines the main families of arguments against self-plagiarism, as well as the question of possibly legitimate reasons to engage in this practice. It concludes that some of the animus frequently reserved for self-plagiarism may be the result of, among others, poor choice of a label, unwarranted generalizations as (...)
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  18. Bruce R. Lewis, Jonathan E. Duchac & S. Douglas Beets (2011). An Academic Publisher's Response to Plagiarism. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):489-506.score: 24.0
    Plagiarism strikes at the heart of academe, eroding the fundamental value of academic research. Recent evidence suggests that acts of plagiarism and awareness of these acts are on the rise in academia. To address this issue, a vein of research has emerged in recent years exploring plagiarism as an area of academic inquiry. In this new academic subject, case studies and analysis have been one of the most influential methodologies employed. Case studies provide a venue where acts (...)
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  19. Bo Brinkman (2013). An Analysis of Student Privacy Rights in the Use of Plagiarism Detection Systems. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1255-1266.score: 24.0
    Plagiarism detection services are a powerful tool to help encourage academic integrity. Adoption of these services has proven to be controversial due to ethical concerns about students’ rights. Central to these concerns is the fact that most such systems make permanent archives of student work to be re-used in plagiarism detection. This computerization and automation of plagiarism detection is changing the relationships of trust and responsibility between students, educators, educational institutions, and private corporations. Educators must respect student (...)
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  20. Erika Löfström & Pauliina Kupila (2013). The Instructional Challenges of Student Plagiarism. Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (3):231-242.score: 24.0
    The focus of this article is university teachers’ and students’ views of plagiarism, plagiarism detection, and the use of plagiarism detection software as learning support. The data were collected from teachers and students who participated in a pilot project to test plagiarism detection software at a major university in Finland. The data were analysed through factor analysis, T-tests and inductive content analysis. Three distinct reasons for plagiarism were identified: intentional, unintentional and contextual. The teachers did (...)
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  21. Colleen Halupa & Doris U. Bolliger (2013). Faculty Perceptions of Student Self Plagiarism: An Exploratory Multi-University Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (4):297-310.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this research study was to evaluate faculty perceptions regarding student self-plagiarism or recycling of student papers. Although there is a plethora of information on plagiarism and faculty who self-plagiarize in publications, there is very little research on how faculty members perceive students re-using all or part of a previously completed assignment in a second assignment. With the wide use of plagiarism detection software, this issue becomes even more crucial. A population of 340 faculty members (...)
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  22. Yongyan Li (2013). Text-Based Plagiarism in Scientific Publishing: Issues, Developments and Education. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1241-1254.score: 24.0
    Text-based plagiarism, or copying language from sources, has recently become an issue of growing concern in scientific publishing. Use of CrossCheck (a computational text-matching tool) by journals has sometimes exposed an unexpected amount of textual similarity between submissions and databases of scholarly literature. In this paper I provide an overview of the relevant literature, to examine how journal gatekeepers perceive textual appropriation, and how automated plagiarism-screening tools have been developed to detect text matching, with the technique now available (...)
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  23. Matthew C. Sonfield (2014). Academic Plagiarism at the Faculty Level: Legal Versus Ethical Issues and a Case Study. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (2):75-87.score: 24.0
    Plagiarism by college and university faculty members has become a growing issue and concern in academia. This paper presents a case study of an extreme and clear case of such plagiarism. Yet an analysis of the legal and ethical contexts of such plagiarism, and the specific chronicle of this case, illustrate the complexities and difficulties in dealing with such situations. Implications for researchers, for colleges and universities, and for academic publishers and journals are offered.
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  24. Atefeh Rezanejad & Saeed Rezaei (2013). Academic Dishonesty at Universities: The Case of Plagiarism Among Iranian Language Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 11 (4):275-295.score: 24.0
    This study investigated Iranian language students’ perception of and familiarity with plagiarism, their attitudes toward their professors regarding this issue, and their reasons for doing so. The participants were 122 undergraduate and graduate language students in Translation, Literature, TEFL, and Linguistics who filled out a validated and piloted questionnaire. Overall, the results indicated that students had different views about the definition of plagiarism and plagiarism was mostly perceived by students as using someone else’s words as if they (...)
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  25. Xin-xin Zhang, Zhao-lin Huo & Yue-Hong Zhang (2013). Detecting and (Not) Dealing with Plagiarism in an Engineering Paper: Beyond CrossCheck—A Case Study. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):1-11.score: 24.0
    In papers in areas such as engineering and the physical sciences, figures, tables and formulae are the basic elements to communicate the authors’ core ideas, workings and results. As a computational text-matching tool, CrossCheck cannot work on these non-textual elements to detect plagiarism. Consequently, when comparing engineering or physical sciences papers, CrossCheck may return a low similarity index even when plagiarism has in fact taken place. A case of demonstrated plagiarism involving engineering papers with a low similarity (...)
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  26. Bruce R. Lewis, Jonathan E. Duchac & S. Douglas Beets (2011). An Academic Publisher's Response to Plagiarism. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):489 - 506.score: 24.0
    Plagiarism strikes at the heart of academe, eroding the fundamental value of academic research. Recent evidence suggests that acts of plagiarism and awareness of these acts are on the rise in academia. To address this issue, a vein of research has emerged in recent yean exploring plagiarism as an area of academic inquiry. In this new academic subject, case studies and analysis have been one of the most influential methodologies employed. Case studies provide a venue where acts (...)
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  27. Stephanie J. Bird (2002). Self-Plagiarism and Dual and Redundant Publications: What is the Problem? Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):543-544.score: 21.0
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  28. Naveed Imran (2010). Electronic Media, Creativity and Plagiarism. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (4):25-44.score: 21.0
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  29. Harold Ogden White (1935). Plagiarism and Imitation During the English Renaissance. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.score: 21.0
     
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  30. Niall Hayes & Lucas D. Introna (2005). Cultural Values, Plagiarism, and Fairness: When Plagiarism Gets in the Way of Learning. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):213 – 231.score: 18.0
    The dramatic increase in the number of overseas students studying in the United Kingdom and other Western countries has required academics to reevaluate many aspects of their own, and their institutions', practices. This article considers differing cultural values among overseas students toward plagiarism and the implications this may have for postgraduate education in a Western context. Based on focus-group interviews, questionnaires, and informal discussions, we report the views of plagiarism among students in 2 postgraduate management programs, both of (...)
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  31. Miguel Roig (2001). Plagiarism and Paraphrasing Criteria of College and University Professors. Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):307 – 323.score: 18.0
    In Study 1, college professors determined whether each of 6 rewritten versions of a paragraph taken from a journal article were instances of plagiarism. Results indicated moderate disagreement as to which rewritten versions had been plagiarized. When another sample of professors (Study 2) was asked to paraphrase the same paragraph, up to 30% appropriated some text from the original. In Study 3, psychology professors paraphrased the same paragraph or a comparable one that was easier to read. Twenty-six percent of (...)
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  32. Daniel E. Martin, Asha Rao & Lloyd R. Sloan (2009). Plagiarism, Integrity, and Workplace Deviance: A Criterion Study. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):36 – 50.score: 18.0
    Plagiarism is increasingly evident in business and academia. Though links between demographic, personality, and situational factors have been found, previous research has not used actual plagiarism behavior as a criterion variable. Previous research on academic dishonesty has consistently used self-report measures to establish prevalence of dishonest behavior. In this study we use actual plagiarism behavior to establish its prevalence, as well as relationships between integrity-related personal selection and workplace deviance measures. This research covers new ground in two (...)
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  33. Dominic A. Sisti (2007). How Do High School Students Justify Internet Plagiarism? Ethics and Behavior 17 (3):215 – 231.score: 18.0
    Internet plagiarism continues unabated and may even be increasing. Questions pertaining to the ethical-moral construct employed by students to justify Internet plagiarism among high school students have remained relatively untouched. Understanding not simply the prevalence of Internet plagiarism but also the variety of explanations used by students to justify their plagiarism seems crucial to curtailing its practice. In this study, I surveyed 160 high school students and endeavored to understand and describe the practices of students who (...)
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  34. Brook J. Sadler (2007). The Wrongs of Plagiarism: Ten Quick Arguments. Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):283-291.score: 18.0
    I offer ten arguments to demonstrate why student plagiarism is unethical. In sum, plagiarism may be theft; involve deception that treats professors as a mere means; violate the trust upon which the professor-student relationship depends; be unfair to other students in more than one way; diminish the student’s education; indulge vices such as indolence and cowardice; foreclose access to the internal goods of the discipline; diminish the value of a university degree; undercut creative self-expression and acceptance of epistemic (...)
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  35. Denis Dutton, Forgery and Plagiarism.score: 18.0
    FORGERY and PLAGIARISM are both forms of fraud. In committing art forgery I claim my work is by another person. As a plagiarist, I claim another person’s work is my own. In forgery, someone’s name is stolen in order to add value to the wrong work; in plagiarism someone’s work is stolen in order to give credit to the wrong author.
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  36. Mathieu Bouville (2008). Plagiarism: Words and Ideas. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):311-322.score: 18.0
    Plagiarism is a crime against academy. It deceives readers, hurts plagiarized authors, and gets the plagiarist undeserved benefits. However, even though these arguments do show that copying other people’s intellectual contribution is wrong, they do not apply to the copying of words. Copying a few sentences that contain no original idea (e.g. in the introduction) is of marginal importance compared to stealing the ideas of others. The two must be clearly distinguished, and the ‘plagiarism’ label should not be (...)
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  37. John W. Snapper (1999). On the Web, Plagiarism Matters More Than Copyright Piracy. Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):127-135.score: 18.0
    Although commonly confused, the values inherent in copyright policy are different from those inherent in scholarly standards for proper accreditation of ideas. Piracy is the infringement of a copyright, and plagiarism is the failure to give credit. The increasing use of Web-based electron publication has created new contexts for both piracy and plagiarism. In so far as piracy and plagiarism are confused, we cannot appreciate how the Web has changed the importance of these very different types of (...)
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  38. Erika Löfström (2011). “Does Plagiarism Mean Anything? LOL.” Students' Conceptions of Writing and Citing. Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):257-275.score: 18.0
    This study focuses on the intersection of research ethics and academic writing, i.e. the use of sources, assignment of credit to the contributors in the research, and the dissemination of research findings. The study utilized a set of semi-structured and open-ended questions. The sample consisted of 269 undergraduate (BA) and graduate (MA) students at a U.S. university department of psychology including major and non-major students. The data showed that although an overwhelming number of the students’ examples related to ethical issues (...)
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  39. Babak Sohrabi, Aryan Gholipour & Neda Mohammadesmaeili (2011). Effects of Personality and Information Technology on Plagiarism: An Iranian Perspective. Ethics and Behavior 21 (5):367 - 379.score: 18.0
    Information technology has played a remarkably important role in developing the contemporary educational system. It not only provides easy access to enormous stores of information but also increases students' scientific efficiency. However, the availability of this technology has also led to increased plagiarism. This study attempted to explore how access to Internet technology contributes to plagiarism problems from the perspective of university students in Iran. A qualitative method to semistructured interviews with 20 students suggested important themes: uncertainty avoidance, (...)
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  40. Gwena Lovett-Hooper, Meera Komarraju, Rebecca Weston & Stephen J. Dollinger (2007). Is Plagiarism a Forerunner of Other Deviance? Imagined Futures of Academically Dishonest Students. Ethics and Behavior 17 (3):323 – 336.score: 18.0
    This study explored the relationship of current incidences of academic dishonesty with future norm/rule-violating behavior. Data were collected from 154 college students enrolled in introductory and upper-level psychology students at a large Midwest public university who received credit for participating. The sample included students from many different majors and all years of study. Participants completed a self-report survey that included a measure of Academic Dishonesty (including three subscales: Self-Dishonest, Social Falsifying, and Plagiarism) and an Imagined Futures Scale (five subscales (...)
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  41. Erika L.öFströM. (2011). “Does Plagiarism Mean Anything? LOL.” Students' Conceptions of Writing and Citing. Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):257-275.score: 18.0
    This study focuses on the intersection of research ethics and academic writing, i.e. the use of sources, assignment of credit to the contributors in the research, and the dissemination of research findings. The study utilized a set of semi-structured and open-ended questions. The sample consisted of 269 undergraduate (BA) and graduate (MA) students at a U.S. university department of psychology including major and non-major students. The data showed that although an overwhelming number of the students’ examples related to ethical issues (...)
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  42. J. Caleb Clanton (2009). A Moral Case Against Certain Uses of Plagiarism Detection Services. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):17-26.score: 18.0
    The statistics on plagiarism are staggering. No wonder, then, that many colleges and universities have started using plagiarism detection services (PDSs) such as Turnitin. But there are problems—and more problems than most critics have recognized. Whereas critics typically focus on legal issues related to intellectual property and privacy rights, I argue that unless we can reasonably suspect academic dishonesty, it’s morally problematic to require submission through a PDS. Even if we insist that the benefits of PDS use are (...)
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  43. Marie Dunne White (1989). Plagiarism and the News Media. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 4 (2):265 – 280.score: 18.0
    Lack of attribution and plagiarism can create a special problem for journalists. As numerous examples indicate, there is confusion about the sometimes fine line between lack of attribution and plagiarism. But there is even more confusion over how to solve the problem. Short of restructuring the journalism profession to create an overall governing body similar to the law bar, there is no way to create a set of national guidelines on when lack of attribution might become plagiarism. (...)
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  44. Michael J. Zigmond & Beth A. Fischer (2002). Beyond Fabrication and Plagiarism: The Little Murders of Everyday Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):229-234.score: 18.0
    Much of the focus of programs designed to promote responsible conduct in research has traditionally been on the high crimes of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. We believe that equally deserving of our attention are the misdemeanors that also can occur. Viewed as individual events, these “little murders” are far less serious. Yet, we believe that in the aggregate they can do great harm, not the least because they can set the stage for far greater crimes.
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  45. Daniel E. Martin PhD, Asha Rao & Lloyd R. Sloan (2009). Plagiarism, Integrity, and Workplace Deviance: A Criterion Study. Ethics and Behavior 19 (1):36-50.score: 18.0
    Plagiarism is increasingly evident in business and academia. Though links between demographic, personality, and situational factors have been found, previous research has not used actual plagiarism behavior as a criterion variable. Previous research on academic dishonesty has consistently used self-report measures to establish prevalence of dishonest behavior. In this study we use actual plagiarism behavior to establish its prevalence, as well as relationships between integrity-related personal selection and workplace deviance measures. This research covers new ground in two (...)
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  46. Gervas K. K. Lau, Allan H. K. Yuen & Jae Park (2013). Toward an Analytical Model of Ethical Decision Making in Plagiarism. Ethics and Behavior 23 (5):360-377.score: 18.0
    Plagiarism by students is a common and worldwide phenomenon with a significant impact on our society. Numerous studies on the pervasive nature of plagiarism among students have focused on the behavioral aspects of plagiarism and how to prevent it. Based on an empirical study of a sample of 463 eighth graders in Hong Kong, this article offers an analytical model to understand the ethical decision-making process in plagiarism among students. Using this model, students' plagiaristic behavior can (...)
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  47. Richard Reilly, Samuel Pry & Mark L. Thomas (2007). Plagiarism. Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):269-282.score: 18.0
    Plagiarism is often equated with theft, but closer inspection reveals plagiarism’s distinctive dimensions. Fundamentally, plagiarism is a form of deception, whereby the plagiarist uses the instructor as a means toward the plagiarist’s own end. Implicitly asking the instructor for a fair and accurate evaluation of the student’s abilities, the plagiarist at the same time sabotages the instructor’s capacity to make that judgment, thereby violating a duty inherent in the student-teacher relationship. Moreover, every act of plagiarism damages (...)
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  48. Viroj Wiwanitkit (2014). Plagiarism, Beyond CrossCheck, Figure and Conceptual Theft. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):613-614.score: 18.0
    Sir, The recent report by Zhang et al. (2013) is very interesting. For sure, using CrossCheck might help identify some plagiarisms, especially for those with verbatim copy. However, the plagiarism can be seen in other forms including to figure and conceptual plagiarism (Wiwanitkit 2008, 2011). The figure plagiarism is a challenging thing for the journal since it is more difficult to detect than textual plagiarism (Wiwanitkit 2011). In addition, there are also more difficult cases of figure (...)
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  49. Alireza Ahmadi (2014). Plagiarism in the Academic Context: A Study of Iranian EFL Learners. Research Ethics 10 (3):151-168.score: 18.0
    The present study was an attempt to shed light on the status of plagiarism in the Iranian academic context. It tried to survey the EFL learners’ perceptions of and reasons for different types of plagiarism. To this end, 132 EFL learners from different Iranian universities took part in the study. The data were collected through using a questionnaire specifically designed to gather information on plagiarism. The results indicated that plagiarism is quite common in the Iranian EFL (...)
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