Search results for 'Planets Orbits' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. W. F. Hegel (1987). Philosophical Dissertation on the Orbits of the Planets (1801), Preceded by the 12 Theses Defended on August 27, 1801. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 12 (1/2):269-309.score: 72.0
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  2. Lev Ginzburg & Mark Colyvan, Ecological Orbits: How Planets Move and Populations Grow.score: 72.0
    The main focus of the book is the presentation of the 'inertial' view of population growth. This view provides a rather simple model for complex population dynamics, and is achieved at the level of the single species without invoking species interactions. An important part of this account is the maternal effect. Investment of mothers in the quality of their daughters makes the rate of reproduction of the current generation depend not only on the current environment, but also on the environment (...)
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  3. Barry Gower (1987). Planets and Probability: Daniel Bernouilli on the Inclinations of the Planetary Orbits. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (4):441-454.score: 72.0
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  4. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (2009). Dissertatio Philosophica de Orbitis Planetarum =. Universidad Del País Vasco.score: 60.0
    De Orbitis Planetarum, tesis presentada por Hegel en 1801 para acceder a la Universidad de Jena, es el texto menos conocido del filósofo alemán. Considerado un inmaduro ejercicio de juventud, este libro muestra no sólo el pensamiento del joven Hegel, sino que también refleja el ambiente que enmarcaba el idealismo alemán en torno a la filosofía de la naturaleza. Sin embargo Hegel mantuvo un concepto referido al funcionamiento y legitimidad de los procesos científicos que aparece esbozado en este texto. Esta (...)
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  5. Tauno Mannila (1973). Planetary Gravitation and History. Distributor, Akateeminen Kirjaksuppa.score: 60.0
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  6. Robert Rosenberger (2008). Perceiving Other Planets: Bodily Experience, Interpretation, and the Mars Orbiter Camera. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (1):63 - 75.score: 32.0
    An emerging philosophical perspective called “postphenomenology,” which offers reflection upon human relations to technology, has the potential to increase our understanding of the functions performed by imaging technologies in scientific practice. In what follows, I review some relevant insights and expand them for use in the concrete analysis of practices of image interpretation in science. As a guiding example, I explore how these insights bear upon a contemporary debate in space science over images of the fossilized remains of a river (...)
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  7. Neil Tennant (2010). The Logical Structure of Scientific Explanation and Prediction: Planetary Orbits in a Sun's Gravitational Field. Studia Logica 95 (1/2):207 - 232.score: 24.0
    We present a logically detailed case-study of explanation and prediction in Newtonian mechanics. The case in question is that of a planet's elliptical orbit in the Sun's gravitational field. Care is taken to distinguish the respective contributions of the mathematics that is being applied, and of the empirical hypotheses that receive a mathematical formulation. This enables one to appreciate how in this case the overall logical structure of scientific explanation and prediction is exactly in accordance with the hypotheticodeductive model.
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  8. William Shea (1980). G.W.F. Hegel, Les Orbites des Planètes (Dissertation de 1801). Traduction, Introduction Et Notes Par François De Gandt. Préface de Dominique Dubarle. [REVIEW] Dialogue 19 (04):675-678.score: 24.0
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  9. John Cramer, The Universe as a Watermelon.score: 24.0
    They had to be, because they were the creations of a perfect God, and a circle is the most perfect of geometrical objects. When Johannes Kepler, after spending most of his career trying to make sense of the meticulous planetary observations of Tycho Brahe, concluded that the orbits of the planets were not circles but ellipses, the discovery sent shock waves through the community of natural philosophers. The discovery led Newton and others to arrive at the inverse square (...)
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  10. William Shea (1980). G.W.F. Hegel, Les Orbites des Planètes (Dissertation de 1801). Traduction, Introduction Et Notes Par François De Gandt. Préface de Dominique Dubarle. Paris: Vrin, 1979. 203 Pages, Bibliographie, Index des Noms. [REVIEW] Dialogue 19 (4):675-678.score: 24.0
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  11. Charles S. Cockell (2006). The Ethical Relevance of Earth-Like Extrasolar Planets. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):303-314.score: 24.0
    The discovery of Earth-sized extrasolar planets orbiting distant stars will merit an expansion of the sphere of entities worthy of moral consideration. Although it will be a long time, if ever, before humans visit these planets, it is nevertheless worthwhile to develop an environmental ethic that encompasses these planets, as this ethic reflects on our view of life on Earth and elsewhere. A particularly significant case would be a planet that displays spectroscopic signatures of life, although the (...)
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  12. Matthew Benjamin Shindell (2010). Domesticating the Planets: Instruments and Practices in the Development of Planetary Geology. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):191-230.score: 22.0
    This paper examines the roles played by instruments and their associated practices in the development of the field of planetary geology. Specifically, remote sensing instruments and the images produced by instrument users are discussed. It is argued that through these instruments and images the first two generations of planetary geologists were able to 'domesticate' the planets and make them suitable for geological study. But this was not a straightforward process. The instruments themselves had to be 'domesticated' as geological tools, (...)
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  13. Peter Alward, Was “Pluto is a Planet” Ever True?score: 16.0
    In 2006, much to the dismay of many amateur (and some professional) astronomers, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) voted to adopt a definition of „planet‟ which excluded Pluto from the extension of the term. Since its discovery in 1930, Pluto has been designated one of the nine planets in our solar system – veritable celestial royalty among the thousands of objects that make up this system. But with the discovery of a number of objects of similar size and orbit (...)
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  14. Christopher Cullen (2011). Understanding the Planets in Ancient China: Prediction and Divination in the Wu Xing Zhan. Early Science and Medicine 16 (3):218-251.score: 15.0
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  15. Antony Avenel (1957). View From Orbit Ii. London, W. Laurie.score: 14.0
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  16. Friederike Moltmann (forthcoming). The Number of Planets, a Number-Referring Term? In Philip A. Ebert & Marcus Rossberg (eds.), Abstractionism. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    The question whether numbers are objects is a central question in the philosophy of mathematics. Frege made use of a syntactic criterion for objethood: numbers are objects because there are singular terms that stand for them, and not just singular terms in some formal language, but in natural language in particular. In particular, Frege (1884) thought that both noun phrases like the number of planets and simple numerals like eight as in (1) are singular terms referring to numbers as (...)
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  17. Peter Zachar & Kenneth Kendler (2012). The Removal of Pluto From the Class of Planets and Homosexuality From the Class of Psychiatric Disorders: A Comparison. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):4-.score: 12.0
    We compare astronomers' removal of Pluto from the listing of planets and psychiatrists' removal of homosexuality from the listing of mental disorders. Although the political maneuverings that emerged in both controversies are less than scientifically ideal, we argue that competition for "scientific authority" among competing groups is a normal part of scientific progress. In both cases, a complicated relationship between abstract constructs and evidence made the classification problem thorny.
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  18. Matthias Brack (2001). Bifurcation Cascades and Self-Similarity of Periodic Orbits with Analytical Scaling Constants in Hénon–Heiles Type Potentials. Foundations of Physics 31 (2):209-232.score: 12.0
    We investigate the isochronous bifurcations of the straight-line librating orbit in the Hénon–Heiles and related potentials. With increasing scaled energy e, they form a cascade of pitchfork bifurcations that cumulate at the critical saddle-point energy e=1. The stable and unstable orbits created at these bifurcations appear in two sequences whose self-similar properties possess an analytical scaling behavior. Different from the standard Feigenbaum scenario in area preserving two-dimensional maps, here the scaling constants α and β corresponding to the two spatial (...)
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  19. Kenneth R. Berger & Edmond A. Murphy (1989). Angular Homeostasis: III. The Formalism of Discrete Orbits in Ontogeny. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (4).score: 12.0
    The formal properties of orbits in a plane are explored by elementary topology. The notions developed from first principles include: convex and polygonal orbits; convexity; orientation, winding number and interior; convex and star-shaped regions. It is shown that an orbit that is convex with respect to each of its interior points bounds a convex region. Also, an orbit that is convex with respect to a fixed point bounds a star-shaped region.Biological considerations that directed interest to these patterns are (...)
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  20. Peter A. Cholak, Rodney Downey & Leo A. Harrington (2008). The Complexity of Orbits of Computably Enumerable Sets. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 14 (1):69 - 87.score: 12.0
    The goal of this paper is to announce there is a single orbit of the c.e. sets with inclusion, ε, such that the question of membership in this orbit is ${\Sigma _1^1 }$ -complete. This result and proof have a number of nice corollaries: the Scott rank of ε is $\omega _1^{{\rm{CK}}}$ + 1; not all orbits are elementarily definable; there is no arithmetic description of all orbits of ε; for all finite α ≥ 9, there is a (...)
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  21. John Cramer, Extrasolar Planets and Occult Astronomy.score: 12.0
    Keywords: extrasolar planets Hubble telescope occulter apodization life oxygen Published in the March-2007 issue of Analog Science Fiction & Fact Magazine ; This column was written and submitted 10/17/2006 and is copyrighted ©2006 by John G. Cramer. All rights reserved. No part may be reproduced in any form without the explicit permission of the author.
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  22. Heinz Krüger (1993). Classical Limit of Real Dirac Theory: Quantization of Relativistic Central Field Orbits. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 23 (9):1265-1288.score: 10.0
    The classical limit of real Dirac theory is derived as the lowest-order contribution in $\mathchar'26\mkern-10mu\lambda = \hslash /mc$ of a new, exact polar decomposition. The resulting classical spinor equation is completely integrated for stationary solutions to arbitrary central fields. Imposing single-valuedness on the covering space of a bivector-valued extension to these classical solutions, orbital angular momentum, energy, and spin directions are quantized. The quantization of energy turns out to yield the WKB formula of Bessey, Uhlenbeck, and Good. It is demonstrated (...)
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  23. Lorenzo Iorio (2007). Can the Pioneer Anomaly Be of Gravitational Origin? A Phenomenological Answer. Foundations of Physics 37 (6):897-918.score: 10.0
    In order to satisfy the equivalence principle, any non-conventional mechanism proposed to gravitationally explain the Pioneer anomaly, in the form in which it is presently known from the so-far analyzed Pioneer 10/11 data, cannot leave out of consideration its impact on the motion of the planets of the Solar System as well, especially those orbiting in the regions in which the anomalous behavior of the Pioneer probes manifested itself. In this paper we, first, discuss the residuals of the right (...)
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  24. Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon (2005). Kepler's Move From. Perspectives on Science 13 (1).score: 10.0
    : This study of the concept of orbit is intended to throw light on the nature of revolutionary concepts in science. We observe that Kepler transformed theoretical astronomy that was understood in terms of orbs [Latin: orbes] (spherical shells to which the planets were attached) and models (called hypotheses at the time), by introducing a single term, orbit [Latin: orbita], that is, the path of a planet in space resulting from the action of physical causes expressed in laws of (...)
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  25. Leo Harrington & Robert I. Soare (1998). Codable Sets and Orbits of Computably Enumerable Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (1):1-28.score: 10.0
    A set X of nonnegative integers is computably enumerable (c.e.), also called recursively enumerable (r.e.), if there is a computable method to list its elements. Let ε denote the structure of the computably enumerable sets under inclusion, $\varepsilon = (\{W_e\}_{e\in \omega}, \subseteq)$ . We previously exhibited a first order ε-definable property Q(X) such that Q(X) guarantees that X is not Turing complete (i.e., does not code complete information about c.e. sets). Here we show first that Q(X) implies that X has (...)
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  26. J. Bruce Brackenridge (1982). Kepler, Elliptical Orbits, and Celestial Circularity: A Study in the Persistence of Metaphysical Commitment. Annals of Science 39 (2):117-143.score: 10.0
    Summary The metaphysical commitment to the circle as the essential element in the analysis of celestial motion has long been recognized as the hallmark of classical astronomy. What has not always been clear, however, is that the circle continued to serve Kepler as a central element in his astronomy after the discovery of the elliptical orbit of Mars. Moreover, the circle also functioned for Kepler in geometry to select the basic polygons, in music to select the basic harmonies, and in (...)
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  27. John Martineau (1995/2002). A Little Book of Coincidence. Walker & Company.score: 10.0
    A most unusual guide to the solar system, A Little Book of Coincidence suggests that there may be fundamental relationships between space, time, and life that have not yet been fully understood. From the observations of Ptolemy and Kepler to the Harmony of the Spheres and the hidden structure of the solar system, John Martineau reveals the exquisite orbital patterns of the planets and the mathematical relationships that govern them. A table shows the relative measurements of each planet in (...)
     
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  28. Edmond A. Murphy, Kenneth R. Berger, Joseph E. Trojak & E. Manuel Rosell (1989). Angular Homeostasis: IV. Polygonal Orbits. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (4).score: 10.0
    Some properties are discussed of regular polygons that may result from angular homeostatic processes in stable orbit. To characterize these homeostatic polygons we need to discuss the winding number, the sidedness (integer, fractional and irrational), multiplicity, envelopes, and density. A regular (i.e., equilateral, equiangular) polygon may be closed in one revolution about its unique center, in multiple revolutions, or not at all. A homeostatic polygon can be generated only if all vertices are included in a single polygon, which occurs if (...)
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  29. J. Biro (2010). The Number of Planets is Not a Number. Analysis 70 (4):622-631.score: 9.0
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  30. Bertrand Beaumont (1954). Hegel and the Seven Planets. Mind 63 (250):246-248.score: 9.0
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  31. Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon (2005). Kepler's Move From Orbs to Orbits: Documenting a Revolutionary Scientific Concept. Perspectives on Science 13 (1):74-111.score: 9.0
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  32. Martin Worthington (2004). Planets, Livers and Omens in Mesopotamia. Early Science and Medicine 9 (2):136-143.score: 9.0
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  33. Mary Midgley (2005). Souls, Minds, Bodies and Planets. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (56):7-.score: 9.0
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  34. Peter Kosso (2006). Detecting Extrasolar Planets. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (2):224-236.score: 9.0
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  35. Peter Cholak (1990). Boolean Algebras and Orbits of the Lattice of R.E. Sets Modulo the Finite Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):744-760.score: 9.0
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  36. E. Herrmann (1983). Orbits of Hyperhypersimple Sets and the Lattice of ∑03 Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (3):693 - 699.score: 9.0
    It will be shown that in the lattice of recursively enumerable sets all lattices $\underline{L}(X)$ are elementarily definable with parameters, where X is Σ 0 3 and $\underline{L}^3(X)$ consists of all Σ 0 3 sets containing X.
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  37. F. Saxl (1938). The Literary Sources of the 'Finiguerra Planets'. Journal of the Warburg Institute 2 (1):72-74.score: 9.0
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  38. P. D. Magnus (2012). Scientific Enquiry and Natural Kinds: From Planets to Mallards. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 9.0
    These are indispensable for successful science in some domain; in short, they are natural kinds. This book gives a general account of what it is to be a natural kind. It untangles philosophical puzzles surrounding natural kinds.
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  39. Dirk Baltzly (forthcoming). Two Aristotelian Puzzles About Planets and Their Neoplatonic Reception. Apeiron:1-19.score: 9.0
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  40. Amir Mohammad Gamini & Hossein Masoumi Hamedani (2013). Al-Shīrāzī and the Empirical Origin of Ptolemy's Equant in His Model of the Superior Planets. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 23 (1):47-67.score: 9.0
  41. Philip E. B. Jourdain (1920). Elliptic Orbits and the Growth of the Third Law with Newton. The Monist 30 (2):183-198.score: 9.0
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  42. Joseph Margolis (1975). The Planets Are Nine in Number. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):459 - 465.score: 9.0
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  43. Bruce Pourciau (2007). From Centripetal Forces to Conic Orbits: A Path Through the Early Sections of Newton's Principia. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):56-83.score: 9.0
  44. D'Arcy W. Thompson (1910). On Plato's 'Theory of the Planets,' Republic X. 616 E. The Classical Review 24 (05):137-142.score: 9.0
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  45. Alan C. Bowen (2012). Simplicius on the Planets and Their Motions: In Defense of a Heresy. Brill.score: 9.0
    The book contends that the digression ending Simplicius’ In de caelo 2.12 is not a proper history of early Greek planetary theory, but a creative atempt to show that to accept Ptolemy’s planetary hypotheses one need not repudiate ...
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  46. Grégory Duby (2003). Automorphisms with Only Infinite Orbits on Non-Algebraic Elements. Archive for Mathematical Logic 42 (5):435-447.score: 9.0
    This paper generalizes results of F. Körner from [4] where she established the existence of maximal automorphisms (i.e. automorphisms moving all non-algebraic elements). An ω-maximal automorphism is an automorphism whose powers are maximal automorphisms. We prove that any structure has an elementary extension with an ω-maximal automorphism. We also show the existence of ω-maximal automorphisms in all countable arithmetically saturated structures. Further we describe the pairs of tuples (¯a,¯b) for which there is an ω-maximal automorphism mapping ¯a to ¯b.
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  47. Peter Cholak, Rod Downey & Eberhard Herrmann (2001). Some Orbits For. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 107 (1-3):193-226.score: 9.0
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  48. J. J. Hall (1971). 'Planets' in Simplicius "De Caelo" 471.1 Ff. Journal of Hellenic Studies 91:138-139.score: 9.0
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  49. F. Jamil Ragep (2000). Edward Grant, Planets, Stars, and Orbs: The Medieval Cosmos, 1200–1687. 1st Paperback Ed. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. Xxiii, 816; 16 Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $32.95. First Published in 1994. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (1):184-186.score: 9.0
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  50. Lawrence J. Taylor & Rolf A. Zwaan (2010). Grasping Spheres, Not Planets. Cognition 115 (1):39-45.score: 9.0
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