Search results for 'Planets Orbits' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lev Ginzburg & Mark Colyvan, Ecological Orbits: How Planets Move and Populations Grow.
    The main focus of the book is the presentation of the 'inertial' view of population growth. This view provides a rather simple model for complex population dynamics, and is achieved at the level of the single species without invoking species interactions. An important part of this account is the maternal effect. Investment of mothers in the quality of their daughters makes the rate of reproduction of the current generation depend not only on the current environment, but also on the environment (...)
     
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  2.  37
    G. W. F. Hegel (1987). Philosophical Dissertation on the Orbits of the Planets (1801), Preceded by the 12 Theses Defended on August 27, 1801. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 12 (1/2):269-309.
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  3.  3
    Barry Gower (1987). Planets and Probability: Daniel Bernouilli on the Inclinations of the Planetary Orbits. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (4):441-454.
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  4. R. T. A. Innes (1910). Relations Between the Eccentricities and Inclinations of the Orbits of the Planets Jupiter and Saturn. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 2 (1):287-291.
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  5. Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (2009). Dissertatio Philosophica de Orbitis Planetarum =. Universidad Del País Vasco.
    De Orbitis Planetarum, tesis presentada por Hegel en 1801 para acceder a la Universidad de Jena, es el texto menos conocido del filósofo alemán. Considerado un inmaduro ejercicio de juventud, este libro muestra no sólo el pensamiento del joven Hegel, sino que también refleja el ambiente que enmarcaba el idealismo alemán en torno a la filosofía de la naturaleza. Sin embargo Hegel mantuvo un concepto referido al funcionamiento y legitimidad de los procesos científicos que aparece esbozado en este texto. Esta (...)
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  6. Tauno Mannila (1973). Planetary Gravitation and History. Distributor, Akateeminen Kirjaksuppa.
     
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  7.  69
    Robert Knowles (2015). What ‘the Number of Planets is Eight’ Means. Philosophical Studies 172 (10):2757-2775.
    ‘The following sentence is true only if numbers exist: The number of planets is eight. It is true; hence, numbers exist.’ So runs a familiar argument for realism about mathematical objects. But this argument relies on a controversial semantic thesis: that ‘The number of planets’ and ‘eight’ are singular terms standing for the number eight, and the copula expresses identity. This is the ‘Fregean analysis’.I show that the Fregean analysis is false by providing an analysis of sentences such (...)
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  8.  21
    Christopher Cullen (2011). Understanding the Planets in Ancient China: Prediction and Divination in the Wu Xing Zhan. Early Science and Medicine 16 (3):218-251.
    The untitled and anonymous text known by modern scholars under the name Wu xing zhan 'Prognostics of the Five Stars [sc. 'planets']', datable to before 168 bce, is the earliest known surviving Chinese document to give a substantive account of the apparent motions of the five visible planets, and to discuss the significance of those motions. The text includes tabulated predictions of the motions of three planets from 246 bce to 177 bce. In each case it is (...)
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  9.  4
    Antony Flew (1982). Another Idea of Necessary Connection. Philosophy 57 (222):487 - 494.
    One of the greatest of Hume's philosophical achievements, which becomes in its turn an assumption presupposed by some of the others, is perhaps best stated at the end of the First Enquiry : ‘If we reason a priori , anything may appear able to produce anything. The falling of a pebble may, for aught we know, extinguish the sun; or the wish of a man control the planets in their orbits. It is only experience, which teaches us the (...)
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  10.  3
    Thomas P. Weber (2007). Carl du Prel (1839–1899): Explorer of Dreams, the Soul, and the Cosmos. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (3):593-604.
    Nineteenth-century spiritism was a blend of religious elements, the philosophy of mind, science and popular science and contacts with extraterrestrials were a commonplace phenomenon during spiritistic séances. Using the example of Carl du Prel I show how his comprehensive mystic philosophy originated in a theory of extraterrestrial life. Carl du Prel used a Darwinian and monistic framework, theories of the unconscious and a Neo-Kantian epistemology to formulate a philosophy of astronomy and extraterrestrial life. He claimed that the mechanism of Darwinian (...)
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  11.  5
    John Cramer, The Universe as a Watermelon.
    They had to be, because they were the creations of a perfect God, and a circle is the most perfect of geometrical objects. When Johannes Kepler, after spending most of his career trying to make sense of the meticulous planetary observations of Tycho Brahe, concluded that the orbits of the planets were not circles but ellipses, the discovery sent shock waves through the community of natural philosophers. The discovery led Newton and others to arrive at the inverse square (...)
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  12.  3
    Liang Zhixue (1981). Hegel's Natural Philosophy. Contemporary Chinese Thought 13 (1):87-104.
    Hegel's natural philosophy is an integral part of his objective idealist philosophical system, is his encyclopedic narration of all the achievements in the natural sciences attained up to the early years of the nineteenth century. Only after a long process of distillation did he tie together his philosophy of thought and of natural science to establish his rich and comprehensive natural philosophy. His On the Orbits of the Planets , written to secure his teaching credentials for the University (...)
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  13. I. Bernard Cohen & Anne Whitman (eds.) (2016). The Principia: The Authoritative Translation and Guide: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. University of California Press.
    In his monumental 1687 work, _Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica_, known familiarly as the _Principia_, Isaac Newton laid out in mathematical terms the principles of time, force, and motion that have guided the development of modern physical science. Even after more than three centuries and the revolutions of Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics, Newtonian physics continues to account for many of the phenomena of the observed world, and Newtonian celestial dynamics is used to determine the orbits of our space vehicles. (...)
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  14. I. Bernard Cohen, Anne Whitman & Julia Budenz (eds.) (2016). The Principia: The Authoritative Translation and Guide: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. University of California Press.
    In his monumental 1687 work, _Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica_, known familiarly as the _Principia_, Isaac Newton laid out in mathematical terms the principles of time, force, and motion that have guided the development of modern physical science. Even after more than three centuries and the revolutions of Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics, Newtonian physics continues to account for many of the phenomena of the observed world, and Newtonian celestial dynamics is used to determine the orbits of our space vehicles. (...)
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  15. I. Bernard Cohen, Anne Whitman & Julia Budenz (eds.) (2016). The Principia: The Authoritative Translation: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. University of California Press.
    In his monumental 1687 work, _Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica_, known familiarly as the _Principia_, Isaac Newton laid out in mathematical terms the principles of time, force, and motion that have guided the development of modern physical science. Even after more than three centuries and the revolutions of Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics, Newtonian physics continues to account for many of the phenomena of the observed world, and Newtonian celestial dynamics is used to determine the orbits of our space vehicles. (...)
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  16. I. Bernard Cohen, Anne Whitman & Julia Budenz (eds.) (2016). The Principia: The Authoritative Translation: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. University of California Press.
    In his monumental 1687 work, _Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica_, known familiarly as the _Principia_, Isaac Newton laid out in mathematical terms the principles of time, force, and motion that have guided the development of modern physical science. Even after more than three centuries and the revolutions of Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics, Newtonian physics continues to account for many of the phenomena of the observed world, and Newtonian celestial dynamics is used to determine the orbits of our space vehicles. (...)
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  17.  39
    Peter Zachar & Kenneth Kendler (2012). The Removal of Pluto From the Class of Planets and Homosexuality From the Class of Psychiatric Disorders: A Comparison. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):4-.
    We compare astronomers' removal of Pluto from the listing of planets and psychiatrists' removal of homosexuality from the listing of mental disorders. Although the political maneuverings that emerged in both controversies are less than scientifically ideal, we argue that competition for "scientific authority" among competing groups is a normal part of scientific progress. In both cases, a complicated relationship between abstract constructs and evidence made the classification problem thorny.
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  18. Friederike Moltmann (forthcoming). The Number of Planets, a Number-Referring Term? In Philip A. Ebert & Marcus Rossberg (eds.), Abstractionism. Oxford University Press
    The question whether numbers are objects is a central question in the philosophy of mathematics. Frege made use of a syntactic criterion for objethood: numbers are objects because there are singular terms that stand for them, and not just singular terms in some formal language, but in natural language in particular. In particular, Frege (1884) thought that both noun phrases like the number of planets and simple numerals like eight as in (1) are singular terms referring to numbers as (...)
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  19.  13
    Peter A. Cholak, Rodney Downey & Leo A. Harrington (2008). The Complexity of Orbits of Computably Enumerable Sets. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 14 (1):69 - 87.
    The goal of this paper is to announce there is a single orbit of the c.e. sets with inclusion, ε, such that the question of membership in this orbit is ${\Sigma _1^1 }$ -complete. This result and proof have a number of nice corollaries: the Scott rank of ε is $\omega _1^{{\rm{CK}}}$ + 1; not all orbits are elementarily definable; there is no arithmetic description of all orbits of ε; for all finite α ≥ 9, there is a (...)
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  20.  9
    Bruce H. Pourciau (1991). On Newton's Proof That Inverse-Square Orbits Must Be Conics. Annals of Science 48 (2):159-172.
    Physicists and historians of science have always held that Isaac Newton should receive credit for the first proof that inverse-square orbits must be conics. This conviction derives from a brief argument, regarded as essentially correct, given by Newton in the Principia. Recently, however, it has been contended that this outline or sketch contains irreparable logical flaws. Here, the logical structure of this outline of Newton's, as well as the details that this outline omits, are carefully examined. We find that (...)
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  21.  13
    Charles S. Cockell (2006). The Ethical Relevance of Earth-Like Extrasolar Planets. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):303-314.
    The discovery of Earth-sized extrasolar planets orbiting distant stars will merit an expansion of the sphere of entities worthy of moral consideration. Although it will be a long time, if ever, before humans visit these planets, it is nevertheless worthwhile to develop an environmental ethic that encompasses these planets, as this ethic reflects on our view of life on Earth and elsewhere. A particularly significant case would be a planet that displays spectroscopic signatures of life, although the (...)
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  22.  13
    Peter Kosso (2006). Detecting Extrasolar Planets. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (2):224-236.
    The detection of extrasolar planets presents a good case in which to clarify the distinction between observation and inference from evidence. By asking whether these planets have been observed or inferred from evidence, and by using the scientific details to answer the question, we will get a clearer understanding of the epistemic difference between these two forms of information. The issue of scientific realism pivots on this distinction, and the results of this case will help to articulate the (...)
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  23.  9
    Amir Mohammad Gamini & Hossein Masoumi Hamedani (2013). Al-Shīrāzī and the Empirical Origin of Ptolemy's Equant in His Model of the Superior Planets. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 23 (1):47-67.
    Ptolemy presents only one argument for the eccentricity in his models of the superior planets, while each one of them has two eccentricities: one for center of the uniform motion, the other for the center of the constant distance. To take into account the first eccentricity, he introduces the equant point, but he provides no argument for the eccentricity of the center of the deferent. Why is the second eccentricity different from the first one? The 13 th century astronomer (...)
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  24.  11
    Matthias Brack (2001). Bifurcation Cascades and Self-Similarity of Periodic Orbits with Analytical Scaling Constants in Hénon–Heiles Type Potentials. Foundations of Physics 31 (2):209-232.
    We investigate the isochronous bifurcations of the straight-line librating orbit in the Hénon–Heiles and related potentials. With increasing scaled energy e, they form a cascade of pitchfork bifurcations that cumulate at the critical saddle-point energy e=1. The stable and unstable orbits created at these bifurcations appear in two sequences whose self-similar properties possess an analytical scaling behavior. Different from the standard Feigenbaum scenario in area preserving two-dimensional maps, here the scaling constants α and β corresponding to the two spatial (...)
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  25.  1
    Peter Cholak, Rod Downey & Eberhard Herrmann (2001). Some Orbits for E. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 107 (1-3):193-226.
    In this article we establish the existence of a number of new orbits in the automorphism group of the computably enumerable sets. The degree theoretical aspects of these orbits also are examined.
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  26.  17
    Kenneth R. Berger & Edmond A. Murphy (1989). Angular Homeostasis: III. The Formalism of Discrete Orbits in Ontogeny. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (4).
    The formal properties of orbits in a plane are explored by elementary topology. The notions developed from first principles include: convex and polygonal orbits; convexity; orientation, winding number and interior; convex and star-shaped regions. It is shown that an orbit that is convex with respect to each of its interior points bounds a convex region. Also, an orbit that is convex with respect to a fixed point bounds a star-shaped region.Biological considerations that directed interest to these patterns are (...)
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  27.  5
    Bruce Pourciau (2007). From Centripetal Forces to Conic Orbits: A Path Through the Early Sections of Newton's Principia. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):56-83.
    In this study, we test the security of a crucial plank in the Principia’s mathematical foundation, namely Newton’s path leading to his solution of the famous Inverse Kepler Problem: a body attracted toward an immovable center by a centripetal force inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the center must move on a conic having a focus in that center. This path begins with his definitions of centripetal and motive force, moves through the second law of motion, then (...)
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  28.  1
    John Cramer, Extrasolar Planets and Occult Astronomy.
    Keywords: extrasolar planets Hubble telescope occulter apodization life oxygen Published in the March-2007 issue of Analog Science Fiction & Fact Magazine ; This column was written and submitted 10/17/2006 and is copyrighted ©2006 by John G. Cramer. All rights reserved. No part may be reproduced in any form without the explicit permission of the author.
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  29.  2
    Matthew Benjamin Shindell (2010). Domesticating the Planets: Instruments and Practices in the Development of Planetary Geology. Spontaneous Generations 4 (1):191-230.
    This paper examines the roles played by instruments and their associated practices in the development of the field of planetary geology. Specifically, remote sensing instruments and the images produced by instrument users are discussed. It is argued that through these instruments and images the first two generations of planetary geologists were able to 'domesticate' the planets and make them suitable for geological study. But this was not a straightforward process. The instruments themselves had to be 'domesticated' as geological tools, (...)
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  30. Kevin Timpe (2015). What ‘the Number of Planets is Eight’ Means. Philosophical Studies 172 (10):2757-2775.
    ‘The following sentence is true only if numbers exist: The number of planets is eight. It is true; hence, numbers exist.’ So runs a familiar argument for realism about mathematical objects. But this argument relies on a controversial semantic thesis: that ‘The number of planets’ and ‘eight’ are singular terms standing for the number eight, and the copula expresses identity. This is the ‘Fregean analysis’.
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  31. E. Herrmann (1983). Orbits of Hyperhypersimple Sets and the Lattice of ∑03 Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (3):693 - 699.
    It will be shown that in the lattice of recursively enumerable sets all lattices $\underline{L}(X)$ are elementarily definable with parameters, where X is Σ 0 3 and $\underline{L}^3(X)$ consists of all Σ 0 3 sets containing X.
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  32. Wolfgang Maass (1984). On the Orbits of Hyperhypersimple Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):51-62.
    This paper contributes to the question of under which conditions recursively enumerable sets with isomorphic lattices of recursively enumerable supersets are automorphic in the lattice of all recursively enumerable sets. We show that hyperhypersimple sets (i.e. sets where the recursively enumerable supersets form a Boolean algebra) are automorphic if there is a Σ 0 3 -definable isomorphism between their lattices of supersets. Lerman, Shore and Soare have shown that this is not true if one replaces Σ 0 3 by Σ (...)
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  33.  78
    Woodhouse Lane (2012). Seeing Dark Things, by Roy Sorensen. New York, NY: OUP, 2008. Pp. Ix Roy Sorensen's Book, Seeing Dark Things, Begins with 'The Eclipse Riddle'. Suppose That One is Viewing In Between Oneself and the Sun Are Two Planets, One Smaller and Closer, Called. [REVIEW] Mind 121:483.
  34.  15
    Carl Brusse (2016). Planets, Pluralism, and Conceptual Lineage. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 53:93-106.
    Conceptual change can occur for a variety of reasons; some more scientifically significant than others. The 2006 definition of ‘planet’, which saw Pluto reclassified as a dwarf planet, is an example toward the more mundane end of the scale. I argue however that this case serves as a useful example of a related phenomenon, whereby what appears to be a single kind term conceals two or more distinct concepts with independent scientific utility. I examine the historical background to this case, (...)
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  35.  26
    Vera Hoffmann-Kolss (forthcoming). Of Brains and Planets: On a Causal Criterion for Mind-Brain Identities. Synthese:1-13.
    Whether mental properties are identical with neural properties is one of the central questions of contemporary philosophy of mind. Many philosophers agree that even if mental properties are identical with neural properties, the mind-brain identity thesis cannot be established on empirical grounds, but only be vindicated by theoretical philosophical considerations. In his paper ‘When Is a Brain Like the Planet?’, Clark Glymour proposes a causal criterion for local property identifications and claims that this criterion can be used to empirically establish (...)
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  36. Bertrand Beaumont (1954). Hegel and the Seven Planets. Mind 63 (250):246-248.
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  37.  16
    P. D. Magnus (2012). Scientific Enquiry and Natural Kinds: From Planets to Mallards. Palgrave Macmillan.
    These are indispensable for successful science in some domain; in short, they are natural kinds. This book gives a general account of what it is to be a natural kind. It untangles philosophical puzzles surrounding natural kinds.
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  38.  3
    Vera Hoffmann-Kolss (2016). Of Brains and Planets: On a Causal Criterion for Mind-Brain Identities. Synthese 193 (4):1177-1189.
    Whether mental properties are identical with neural properties is one of the central questions of contemporary philosophy of mind. Many philosophers agree that even if mental properties are identical with neural properties, the mind-brain identity thesis cannot be established on empirical grounds, but only be vindicated by theoretical philosophical considerations. In his paper ‘When Is a Brain Like the Planet?’, Clark Glymour proposes a causal criterion for local property identifications and claims that this criterion can be used to empirically establish (...)
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  39. J. Biro (2010). The Number of Planets is Not a Number. Analysis 70 (4):622-631.
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  40.  45
    Heinz Krüger (1993). Classical Limit of Real Dirac Theory: Quantization of Relativistic Central Field Orbits. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 23 (9):1265-1288.
    The classical limit of real Dirac theory is derived as the lowest-order contribution in $\mathchar'26\mkern-10mu\lambda = \hslash /mc$ of a new, exact polar decomposition. The resulting classical spinor equation is completely integrated for stationary solutions to arbitrary central fields. Imposing single-valuedness on the covering space of a bivector-valued extension to these classical solutions, orbital angular momentum, energy, and spin directions are quantized. The quantization of energy turns out to yield the WKB formula of Bessey, Uhlenbeck, and Good. It is demonstrated (...)
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  41.  69
    Neil Tennant (2010). The Logical Structure of Scientific Explanation and Prediction: Planetary Orbits in a Sun's Gravitational Field. Studia Logica 95 (1/2):207 - 232.
    We present a logically detailed case-study of explanation and prediction in Newtonian mechanics. The case in question is that of a planet's elliptical orbit in the Sun's gravitational field. Care is taken to distinguish the respective contributions of the mathematics that is being applied, and of the empirical hypotheses that receive a mathematical formulation. This enables one to appreciate how in this case the overall logical structure of scientific explanation and prediction is exactly in accordance with the hypotheticodeductive model.
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  42.  12
    Bernard R. Goldstein & Giora Hon (2005). Kepler's Move From Orbs to Orbits: Documenting a Revolutionary Scientific Concept. Perspectives on Science 13 (1):74-111.
    This study of the concept of orbit is intended to throw light on the nature of revolutionary concepts in science. We observe that Kepler transformed theoretical astronomy that was understood in terms of orbs [Latin: orbes] and models , by introducing a single term, orbit [Latin: orbita], that is, the path of a planet in space resulting from the action of physical causes expressed in laws of nature. To demonstrate the claim that orbit is a revolutionary concept we pursue three (...)
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  43.  13
    Marion Godman (2014). Scientific Enquiry and Natural Kinds: From Planets to Mallards. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 28 (3):343-346.
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  44.  17
    Robert Rosenberger (2008). Perceiving Other Planets: Bodily Experience, Interpretation, and the Mars Orbiter Camera. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (1):63 - 75.
    An emerging philosophical perspective called “postphenomenology,” which offers reflection upon human relations to technology, has the potential to increase our understanding of the functions performed by imaging technologies in scientific practice. In what follows, I review some relevant insights and expand them for use in the concrete analysis of practices of image interpretation in science. As a guiding example, I explore how these insights bear upon a contemporary debate in space science over images of the fossilized remains of a river (...)
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  45.  9
    Nikolay Dibrov (2011). Nature of Atomic Orbits. Apeiron 18 (4):352.
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  46.  15
    Philip E. B. Jourdain (1920). Elliptic Orbits and the Growth of the Third Law with Newton. The Monist 30 (2):183-198.
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  47.  10
    J. D. North (2006). Ewa Śniezyńska-Stolot, Astrological Iconography in the Middle Ages: The Decanal Planets. Trans. Joanna Komorowska. Kraków: Jagiellonian University Press, 2003. Paper. Pp. 88 Plus 63 Black-and-White and Color Figures; 6 Tables. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (1):276-277.
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  48.  14
    Peter Cholak (1990). Boolean Algebras and Orbits of the Lattice of R.E. Sets Modulo the Finite Sets. Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):744-760.
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  49.  3
    Neil Tennant (2010). The Logical Structure of Scientific Explanation and Prediction: Planetary Orbits in a Sun’s Gravitational Field. Studia Logica 95 (1-2):207-232.
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  50. N. Guicciardini (2004). Ofer Gal. Meanest Foundations and Nobler Superstructures: Hooke, Newton and the" Compounding of the Celestial Motions of the Planets". Early Science and Medicine 9 (1):63-64.
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