Search results for 'Plato's Symposium' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  89
    Ralph Wedgwood (2009). Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium. Phronesis 54 (4):297-325.
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato’s Symposium (199d–212a). According to this interpretation, the term ‘καλόν’, as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call “intrinsic value”; and “love” (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation, which for Plato consists in the desire to “possess” intrinsically valuable things – that is, according to Plato, to be happy – for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes that “possessing” (...)
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  2.  77
    John M. Armstrong (2009). Review of Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2006). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):208–212.
    The purpose of Sheffield’s careful study is to increase scholarly appreciation of the Symposium as a ‘substantive work in Platonic ethics’ (3). Among the book’s highlights are a persuasive response to Vlastos’ criticism of Plato on love for individuals, an eminently reasonable assessment of the evidence for and against the presence of tripartite psychology in the Symposium, and a delightful interpretation of Alcibiades’ speech at the dialogue’s end—one that reveals elements of satyr play and corroborates rather than undermines (...)
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  3.  57
    Ralph Wedgwood (2009). Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium. Phronesis 54 (4):297-325.
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato's Symposium (199d-212a). According to this interpretation, the term "καλóν", as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call "intrinsic value"; and "love" (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation , which for Plato consists in the desire to "possess" intrinsically valuable things - that is, according to Plato, to be happy - for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes (...)
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  4. Anne Sheppard (2008). Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's Symposium. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.
    This paper draws attention to the Symposium's concern with epideictic rhetoric. It argues that in the Symposium, as in the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, a contrast is drawn between true and false rhetoric. The paper also discusses the dialogue's relationship to drama. Whereas both epideictic rhetoric and drama were directed to a mass audience, the speeches in the Symposium are delivered to a small, select group. The discussion focuses on the style of the speeches delivered by Aristophanes, (...)
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  5.  5
    William J. Prior (2006). The Portrait of Socrates in Plato's Symposium. In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxxi: Winter 2006. OUP Oxford 137-166.
    I argue that, when Alcibiades' encomium to Socrates is interpreted in light of Socrates' presentation of Diotima's speech, which immediately proceeds it, it shows Socrates to be at the top level of Diotima's "ladder of ascent" to Beauty. If Alcibiades is correct, Socrates' pretense of ignorance is an ironic sham. Socrates, as Plato's mystagogos, must have experiential knowledge of the Form of Beauty.
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  6.  33
    Plato (2001). Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete. University of Chicago Press.
    This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's Symposium" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The ...
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  7.  75
    Ulrika Carlsson (2010). Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium. Inquiry 53 (1):41-67.
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to (...)
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  8.  53
    R. L. Hunter (2004). Plato's Symposium. Oxford University Press.
    Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the (...)
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  9. Seth Benardete (ed.) (2001). Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete. University of Chicago Press.
    Plato, Allan Bloom wrote, is "the most erotic of philosophers," and his Symposium is one of the greatest works on the nature of love ever written. This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's _Symposium_" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The Ladder of Love." In the _Symposium,_ Plato recounts a drinking party following an evening meal, where the guests include the (...)
     
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  10.  7
    Leo Strauss (2001). Leo Strauss on Plato's Symposium. University of Chicago Press.
    The first major piece of unpublished work by Leo Strauss to appear in more than thirty years, "Leo Strauss On Plato's "Symposium"" offers the public the unprecedented experience of encountering this renowned scholar as his students did.
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  11.  7
    Elizabeth Pender & D. Anderson (1995). The Masks of Dionysus: A Commentary on Plato's Symposium. Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:206.
    The metaphysical center of Plato’s work has traditionally been taken to be his Doctrine of Forms; the epistemological center, the Doctrine of Recollection. The Symposium has been viewed as one of the clearest explanations of the first and Meno as one of the clearest explanations of the other. The Masks of Dionysos challenges these traditional interpretations.
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  12.  66
    Gabriel Richardson Lear (2006). Permanent Beauty and Becoming Happy in Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press 96.
    Our first encounter with Socrates in the Symposium is bizarre. Aristodemus, surprised to run into Socrates fully bathed and with his sandals on, asks him where he is going “to have made himself so beautiful (kalos)” (174a4, Rowe trans.). Socrates replies that he is on his way to see the lovely Agathon, and so that “he has beautified himself in these ways in order to go, a beauty to a beauty (kalos para kalon)” (174a7–8). Why does Socrates, who in (...)
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  13. David Konstan (2010). « Review Of: Mary P. Nichols, Socrates On Friendship And Community: Reflections On Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, And Lysis ; And Laurence D. Cooper, Eros In Plato, Rousseau, And Nietzsche: The Politics Of Infinity ». [REVIEW] Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 10.
    Mary P. Nichols, Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008. Pp. viii + 229. ISBN 978-0-521-89973-4. Laurence D. Cooper, Eros in Plato, Rousseau, and Nietzsche: The Politics of Infinity. University Park: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2008. Pp. xii + 357. ISBN 978-0-271-03330-3.
     
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  14.  5
    Laura Candiotto (2013). Review of Thomas L. Cooksey, Plato's Symposium: A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London-New York. 2010. [REVIEW] Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society (Plato 12 (2012)).
    The book consists of four chapters (1.Context; 2. Overview of Themes; 3. Reading the Text; 4. Reception and Influence) that offer the reader guidance in reading Plato's Symposium. Secondary literature is mostly in English. The line of interpretation may be defined as partly literary and partly thematic — being aware of the philosophical significance of the adopted style. The literary part contains a detailed description of the characters and the frame story; the thematic part comprises: (…) - 12. (...)
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  15. Plato (forthcoming). Plato's Symposium. Audio CD.
    The dramatic nature of Plato’s dialogues is delightfully evident in the Symposium. The marriage between character and thought bursts forth as the guests gather at Agathon’s house to celebrate the success of his first tragedy. With wit and insight, they each present their ideas about love—from Erixymachus’s scientific naturalism to Aristophanes’ comic fantasy. The unexpected arrival of Alcibiades breaks the spell cast by Diotima’s ethereal climb up the staircase of love to beauty itself. Ecstasy and intoxication clash as Plato (...)
     
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  16. Plato (2003). Plato's Symposium: Audio Cd. Agora Publications.
    The dramatic nature of Plato’s dialogues is delightfully evident in the Symposium. The marriage between character and thought bursts forth as the guests gather at Agathon’s house to celebrate the success of his first tragedy. With wit and insight, they each present their ideas about love—from Erixymachus’s scientific naturalism to Aristophanes’ comic fantasy. The unexpected arrival of Alcibiades breaks the spell cast by Diotima’s ethereal climb up the staircase of love to beauty itself. Ecstasy and intoxication clash as Plato (...)
     
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  17. Kristian Urstad, Loving Socrates: The Individual and the Ladder of Love in Plato's Symposium. Res Cogitans.
    In Plato’s Symposium, the priestess Diotima, whom Socrates introduces as an expert in love, describes how the lover who would advance rightly in erotics would ascend from loving a particular beautiful body and individual to loving Beauty itself. This hierarchy is conventionally referred to as Plato’s scala amoris or ‘ladder of love’, for the reason that the uppermost form of love cannot be reached without having initially stepped on the first rung of the ladder, which is the physical attraction (...)
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  18.  27
    Andrea Nye (1989). The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium. Hypatia 3 (3):45 - 61.
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the (...)
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  19.  48
    Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall (1989). Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech. Hypatia 3 (3):32 - 44.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to (...)
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  20. J. H. Lesher (2006). Some Notable Afterimages of Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press
  21. Mark L. McPherran (2006). Medicine, Magic, and Religion in Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press
  22. Lloyd P. Gerson (2006). A Platonic Reading of Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press
  23.  35
    M. Groneberg (2005). Myth and Science Around Gender and Sexuality: Eros and the Three Sexes in Plato's Symposium. Diogenes 52 (4):39-49.
    Plato's Symposium contains various myths dealing with gender and the erotic, among them Aristophanes' account of the three original sexes, which are here treated from the standpoint of modern science. In particular we see how, since the 19th century, sexology and psychoanalysis have updated concepts of a third sex and androgyny. Similarities with positions in antiquity demonstrate the relevance and force of the general propositions of myths. Differences appear to imply the effective presence of other myths of Judeo-Christian (...)
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  24.  12
    Rick Benitez, The Moral of the Story: On Fables and Philosophy in Plato's 'Symposium'.
    Scholars have puzzled over the fact that Plato’s criticisms of poetry are themselves contained in mimetic works. This paper sheds light on that phenomenon by examining an analogous one. The Symposium contains one fable which is criticised by means of another which is thought to represent Plato’s own view. Diotima’s fable, however, is suspended within a larger narrative that invites us to examine and question it. The Symposium thus affords opportunity to observe Plato’s criticisms of a genre and (...)
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  25.  12
    Gerald Alan Press (2008). Plato's Symposium : Issues in Interpretation and Reception (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):167-168.
    Gerald A. Press - Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 46.1 167-168 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Gerald A. Press Hunter College and City University of New York Graduate Center James Lesher, Debra Nails, and Frisbee Sheffield, editors. Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Washington, D.C.: Center for Hellenic Studies, 2006. Pp. xi + 446. Paper, $29.95. (...) Symposium has been a fertile source of philosophical, literary, and artistic inspiration for more than two thousand years. It continues to inspire debates amid the changing fashions in contemporary Plato interpretation. This volume of papers, which grew out of a conference at the Center for Hellenic Studies in 2005, is divided into four parts. Most of the papers are richly rewarding, but there is space here to do little more than hint at their main points. Part I, "The Symposium and.. (shrink)
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  26.  23
    P. Christopher Smith (2005). Poetry, Socratic Dialectic, and the Desire of the Beautiful in Plato's Symposium. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):233-253.
    I attempt in this paper to argue a thesis that is the opposite of the standard reading of Plato’s Symposium. I maintain that it is not the persuasive speech of thecomic or tragic poets that is criticized and undermined in the dialogue, but Socratic dialectic and dialogical argumentation. This is to say, it is not Aristophanes’ and Agathon’s speeches that are the object of Plato’s critique, but Socrates’ minimalist and rather unpoetic elenchos. My anaysis leads to the conclusion that (...)
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  27.  23
    Robert Metcalf (2009). The Trial of Socrates in Plato's Symposium. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):39-55.
    While many scholarly interpretations of Plato’s Symposium express skepticism toward the content of Alcibiades’ speech, this essay argues Alcibiades’ portrait of Socrates is credible on the whole, is consistent with the portrayal of Socrates elsewhere, and is of great significance for our understanding of philosophical eros as exemplified in Socrates’ philosophical activity. Furthermore, by putting Socrates on trial for hybris, Alcibiades’ speech raises important philosophical questions as to whether the contempt with which he treated Alcibiades is not part and (...)
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  28.  18
    Ludwig C. H. Chen (1983). Knowledge of Beauty in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 33 (01):66-.
    Plato's Symposium consists of six speeches on Eros with the addition of Alcibiades' praise of Socrates. Of these speeches Socrates' speech is philosophically most important. It is true that the speech is given as a report of Diotima's view on Eros, but ‘she is a double of the Platonic Socrates’, and we take her view as the theory of Socrates in this dialogue.
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  29.  12
    John G. Griffith (1990). Static Electricity in Agathon's Speech in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 40 (02):547-.
    Agathon's mannered yet striking encomium on Eros in Plato's Symposium has attracted critical attention in ample measure, yet at least one dark corner remains unilluminated. As the speaker approaches his climax in the words quoted above, he slips into nautical imagery: κυβερντης πιβτης … , but then disconcerts readers and commentators alike by immediately lapsing into the down-to-earth language of παρασττης τε σωτρ … words which seem to lack maritime connotations. The standard editions offer no help: Hug–Schöner devote (...)
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  30. Jakub Jirsa (2007). Frisbee C., C. Sheffield, Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 1:177-183.
    A review of Frisbee C., C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006.
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  31.  3
    Anthony Hooper (2013). The Greatest Hope of All: Aristophanes on Human Nature in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 63 (2):567-579.
    In recent years there has been a renaissance of scholarly interest in Plato's Symposium, as scholars have again begun to recognize the philosophical subtlety and complexity of the dialogue. But despite the quality and quantity of the studies that have been produced few contain an extended analysis of the speech of Aristophanes; an unusual oversight given that Aristophanes' encomium is one of the highlights of the dialogue. In contrast to the plodding and technical speeches that precede it, the (...)
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  32. Luc Brisson (2006). Agathon, Pausanias, and Diotima in Plato's Symposium : Paiderastia and Philosophia. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press
  33.  3
    Susan B. Levin (2006). Plato's "Symposium" (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (3):467-468.
    Susan B. Levin - Plato's "Symposium" - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.3 467-468 Richard Hunter. Plato's "Symposium". New York: Oxford University Press, 2004. Pp. xiii + 150. Cloth, $40.00. Paper, $14.95. The editors of the series in which Plato's "Symposium" appears state that its constituent texts are to be "essays in criticism and interpretation that will do justice to the subtlety and complexity of the works (...)
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  34. Steven Berg (2011). Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium. State University of New York Press.
    _Provocative reinterpretation of Plato's Symposium._.
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  35. Diskin Clay (2006). The Hangover of Plato's Symposium in the Italian Renaissance From Bruni (1435) to Castiglione (1528). In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press 341--59.
  36. Richard Hunter (2004). Plato's Symposium. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Plato's (...)
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  37. Richard Hunter (2006). Plato's Symposium and the Traditions of Ancient Fiction. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press
  38.  15
    E. E. Pender (1992). Spiritual Pregnancy in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 42 (01):72-.
    Although Plato's notion of spiritual pregnancy has received a great deal of critical attention in recent years, the development of the metaphor in the Symposium has not been fully analysed. Close attention to the details of the image reveals two important points which have so far been overlooked: There are two quite different types of spiritual pregnancy in the Symposium: a ‘male’ type, which is analogous to the build-up to physical ejaculation, and a ‘female’ type, which is (...)
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  39.  11
    Mary P. Nichols (2009). Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -- The problem of Socrates : Kierkegaard and Nietzsche -- Kierkegaard : Socrates vs. the God -- Nietzsche : call for an artistic Socrates -- Plato's Socrates -- Love, generation, and political community (the Symposium) -- The prologue -- Phaedrus' praise of nobility -- Pausanias' praise of law -- Eryximachus' praise of art -- Aristophanic comedy -- Tragic victory -- Socrates' turn -- Socrates' prophetess and the daemonic -- Love as generative -- Alcibiades' dramatic entrance -- Alcibiades' (...)
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  40.  62
    Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (2006). Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Oxford University Press.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic, eros, and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted. For Plato, analyzing our desires is a way of reflecting on the kind of people we will turn out to be and on our chances of leading (...)
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  41. Frisbee Sheffield (2006). Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic - eros - and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted. For Plato, analysing our desires is a way of reflecting on the kind of people we will turn out to be and on our chances (...)
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  42.  35
    Cristina Ionescu (2007). The Transition From the Lower to the Higher Mysteries of Love in Plato's Symposium. Dialogue 46 (1):27-42.
    In the Symposium Socrates shows how Diotima initiated him into the mysteries of love in two stages. Yet, at first sight, the teachings offered at the two stages seem divergent and discontinuous. In this article I argue that we can understand the continuity between them if we regard Diotima’s notions of spiritual pregnancy and birth-giving as metaphors suggesting that the metaphysical horizon looming in the background of her teaching is that of Plato’s theory of recollection.Socrate explique dans le Banquet (...)
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  43.  34
    Mary P. Nichols (2004). Socrates' Contest with the Poets in Plato's Symposium. Political Theory 32 (2):186-206.
    Scholars have recently argued that in the Symposium Plato is critical of Socrates and falls closer than his philosophic spokesman to the side of poetry in the old quarrel between philosophy and poetry. Contrary to such interpretations, I argue that on the basis of his experience of a philosophic life, Socrates responds to the poets Plato presents in that dialogue, offering a superior understanding not only of Love but of poetry itself Far from self-sufficient, but like Love "dwell[ing] always (...)
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  44.  8
    Anthony Hooper (2013). The Memory of Virtue: Achieving Immortality in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 63 (2):543-557.
    The prospect of human immortality is manifest in many of Plato's writings, appearing as early as the Apology and the Crito , and as late as Book 12 of the Laws . But nowhere is immortality given so much attention, nor as central a place in Plato's philosophical projects, as in what have traditionally been referred to as his Middle Period works, so it is hardly surprising that we find an extensive treatment of the subject of immortality in (...)
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  45.  5
    Cristián de Bravo Delorme (2014). The meaning of poiesis in Plato's Symposium: A contribution to the problem of technique essence. Alpha (Osorno) 38:227-242.
    Dentro del contexto histórico de la sociedad tecnológica parece urgente considerar los alcances insólitos y los problemas éticos que suscita la provocación técnica actual, los cuales mueven a poner en cuestión la provocación productiva que el hombre ejerce respecto de la naturaleza. Sin embargo antes de tal cuestionamiento es necesario encontrar una vía de acceso a la esencia originaria de la técnica. Este artículo propone un camino de comprensión de la técnica a partir del sentido de la ποíησις según el (...)
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  46.  6
    Günter Figal (2003). Image and Truth: On Plato's Symposium. Prolegomena 2 (2):157-166.
    The Symposium is one of Plato’s most literary and poetic dialogues. How might one reconcile this evidence of Plato’s predilection for poetry in light of his severe critique of poetry in the Republic? Though his critique is modified and refined in other dialogues, the power of his critique is nowhere significantly undermined. I argue in this paper that Plato’s poetic writing is not inconsistent with his critique, and that in fact there is an affinity between his practice of poetry (...)
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  47. Daniel E. Anderson (1993). The Masks of Dionysos: A Commentary on Plato's Symposium. State University of New York Press.
    The metaphysical center of Plato’s work has traditionally been taken to be his Doctrine of Forms; the epistemological center, the Doctrine of Recollection. The Symposium has been viewed as one of the clearest explanations of the first and Meno as one of the clearest explanations of the other. The Masks of Dionysos challenges these traditional interpretations.
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  48. Günter Figal (2003). Das Bild und die Wahrheit: Zu Platons Symposion: Image and Truth: On Plato’s Symposium. Prolegomena 2 (2):157-166.
    The article explores the relation of Plato’s criticism of poetry in Politeia to a seemingly unusual fact that one of his most important dialogues the Symposium is essentially a poetic work, and not a philosophical one. The analysis and the interpretation of the dialogue’s content show that philosophy is concealed in it, that is, presented in its absence. Socratic dialogue-dialectical mode of argumentation constitutes only a transitory episode in the totality of the work, whereas the rest of the content (...)
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  49. Frisbee Sheffield (2009). Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. OUP Oxford.
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic - eros - and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted.
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  50. William S. Cobb (ed.) (1993). The Symposium and the Phaedrus: Plato's Erotic Dialogues. State University of New York Press.
    The Symposium and the Phaedrus are combined here because of their shared theme: a reflection on the nature of erotic love, the love that begins with sexual desire but can transcend that origin and reach even the heights of religious ecstasy. This reflection is carried out explicitly in the speeches and conversations in the dialogues, and implicitly in the dramatic depiction of actions and characters. Thus, the two dialogues deal with a theme of enduring interest and are interesting for (...)
     
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