Search results for 'Plato's Symposium' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ralph Wedgwood (2009). Diotima's Eudaemonism: Intrinsic Value and Rational Motivation in Plato's Symposium. Phronesis 54 (4):297-325.score: 540.0
    This paper gives a new interpretation of the central section of Plato’s Symposium (199d–212a). According to this interpretation, the term ‘καλόν’, as used by Plato here, stands for what many contemporary philosophers call “intrinsic value”; and “love” (ἔρως) is in effect rational motivation, which for Plato consists in the desire to “possess” intrinsically valuable things – that is, according to Plato, to be happy – for as long as possible. An explanation is given of why Plato believes that “possessing” (...)
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  2. John M. Armstrong (2009). Review of Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2006). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):208–212.score: 531.0
    The purpose of Sheffield’s careful study is to increase scholarly appreciation of the Symposium as a ‘substantive work in Platonic ethics’ (3). Among the book’s highlights are a persuasive response to Vlastos’ criticism of Plato on love for individuals, an eminently reasonable assessment of the evidence for and against the presence of tripartite psychology in the Symposium, and a delightful interpretation of Alcibiades’ speech at the dialogue’s end—one that reveals elements of satyr play and corroborates rather than undermines (...)
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  3. Anne Sheppard (2008). Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's Symposium. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.score: 429.0
    This paper draws attention to the Symposium's concern with epideictic rhetoric. It argues that in the Symposium, as in the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, a contrast is drawn between true and false rhetoric. The paper also discusses the dialogue's relationship to drama. Whereas both epideictic rhetoric and drama were directed to a mass audience, the speeches in the Symposium are delivered to a small, select group. The discussion focuses on the style of the speeches delivered by Aristophanes, (...)
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  4. Ulrika Carlsson (2010). Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium. Inquiry 53 (1):41-67.score: 378.0
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to (...)
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  5. Gabriel Richardson Lear (2006). Permanent Beauty and Becoming Happy in Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press. 96.score: 369.0
    Our first encounter with Socrates in the Symposium is bizarre. Aristodemus, surprised to run into Socrates fully bathed and with his sandals on, asks him where he is going “to have made himself so beautiful (kalos)” (174a4, Rowe trans.). Socrates replies that he is on his way to see the lovely Agathon, and so that “he has beautified himself in these ways in order to go, a beauty to a beauty (kalos para kalon)” (174a7–8). Why does Socrates, who in (...)
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  6. Plato (2001). Plato's Symposium: A Translation by Seth Benardete with Commentaries by Allan Bloom and Seth Benardete. University of Chicago Press.score: 369.0
    This new edition brings together the English translation of the renowned Plato scholar and translator, Seth Benardete, with two illuminating commentaries on it: Benardete's "On Plato's Symposium" and Allan Bloom's provocative essay, "The ...
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  7. Laura Candiotto (2013). Review of Thomas L. Cooksey, Plato's Symposium: A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London-New York. 2010. [REVIEW] Plato - the Internet Journal of the International Plato Society (Plato 12 (2012)).score: 369.0
    The book consists of four chapters (1.Context; 2. Overview of Themes; 3. Reading the Text; 4. Reception and Influence) that offer the reader guidance in reading Plato's Symposium. Secondary literature is mostly in English. The line of interpretation may be defined as partly literary and partly thematic — being aware of the philosophical significance of the adopted style. The literary part contains a detailed description of the characters and the frame story; the thematic part comprises: (…) - 12. (...)
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  8. Kristian Urstad, Loving Socrates: The Individual and the Ladder of Love in Plato's Symposium. Res Cogitans.score: 360.0
    In Plato’s Symposium, the priestess Diotima, whom Socrates introduces as an expert in love, describes how the lover who would advance rightly in erotics would ascend from loving a particular beautiful body and individual to loving Beauty itself. This hierarchy is conventionally referred to as Plato’s scala amoris or ‘ladder of love’, for the reason that the uppermost form of love cannot be reached without having initially stepped on the first rung of the ladder, which is the physical attraction (...)
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  9. Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall (1989). Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech. Hypatia 3 (3):32 - 44.score: 360.0
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to (...)
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  10. R. L. Hunter (2004). Plato's Symposium. Oxford University Press.score: 360.0
    Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the (...)
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  11. P. Christopher Smith (2005). Poetry, Socratic Dialectic, and the Desire of the Beautiful in Plato's Symposium. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (2):233-253.score: 360.0
    I attempt in this paper to argue a thesis that is the opposite of the standard reading of Plato’s Symposium. I maintain that it is not the persuasive speech of thecomic or tragic poets that is criticized and undermined in the dialogue, but Socratic dialectic and dialogical argumentation. This is to say, it is not Aristophanes’ and Agathon’s speeches that are the object of Plato’s critique, but Socrates’ minimalist and rather unpoetic elenchos. My anaysis leads to the conclusion that (...)
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  12. Andrea Nye (1989). The Hidden Host: Irigaray and Diotima at Plato's Symposium. Hypatia 3 (3):45 - 61.score: 360.0
    Irigaray's reading of Plato's Symposium in Ethique de la difference sexuelle illustrates both the advantages and the limits of her textual practise. Irigaray's attentive listening to the text allows Diotima's voice to emerge from an overlay of Platonic scholarship. But both the ahistorical nature of that listening and Irigaray's assumption of feminine marginality also make her a party to Plato's sabotage of Diotima's philosophy. Understood in historical context, Diotima is not an anomaly in Platonic discourse, but the (...)
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  13. Nancy Evans (2006). Diotima and Demeter as Mystagogues in Plato's Symposium. Hypatia 21 (2):1 - 27.score: 360.0
    Like the goddess Demeter, Diotima from Mantineia, the prophetess who teaches Socrates about eros and the "rites of love" in Plato's Symposium, was a mystagogue who initiated individuals into her mysteries, mediating to humans esoteric knowledge of the divine. The dialogue, including Diotima's speech, contains religious and mystical language, some of which specifically evokes the female-centered yearly celebrations of Demeter at Eleusis. In this essay, I contextualize the worship of Demeter within the larger system of classical Athenian practices, (...)
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  14. Robert Metcalf (2009). The Trial of Socrates in Plato's Symposium. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):39-55.score: 360.0
    While many scholarly interpretations of Plato’s Symposium express skepticism toward the content of Alcibiades’ speech, this essay argues Alcibiades’ portrait of Socrates is credible on the whole, is consistent with the portrayal of Socrates elsewhere, and is of great significance for our understanding of philosophical eros as exemplified in Socrates’ philosophical activity. Furthermore, by putting Socrates on trial for hybris, Alcibiades’ speech raises important philosophical questions as to whether the contempt with which he treated Alcibiades is not part and (...)
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  15. M. Groneberg (2005). Myth and Science Around Gender and Sexuality: Eros and the Three Sexes in Plato's Symposium. Diogenes 52 (4):39-49.score: 360.0
    Plato's Symposium contains various myths dealing with gender and the erotic, among them Aristophanes' account of the three original sexes, which are here treated from the standpoint of modern science. In particular we see how, since the 19th century, sexology and psychoanalysis have updated concepts of a third sex and androgyny. Similarities with positions in antiquity demonstrate the relevance and force of the general propositions of myths. Differences appear to imply the effective presence of other myths of Judeo-Christian (...)
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  16. Leo Strauss (2001). Leo Strauss on Plato's Symposium. University of Chicago Press.score: 360.0
    The first major piece of unpublished work by Leo Strauss to appear in more than thirty years, "Leo Strauss On Plato's "Symposium"" offers the public the unprecedented experience of encountering this renowned scholar as his students did.
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  17. Luc Brisson (2006). Agathon, Pausanias, and Diotima in Plato's Symposium : Paiderastia and Philosophia. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
     
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  18. Diskin Clay (2006). The Hangover of Plato's Symposium in the Italian Renaissance From Bruni (1435) to Castiglione (1528). In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press. 341--59.score: 360.0
     
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  19. Lloyd P. Gerson (2006). A Platonic Reading of Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
  20. Richard Hunter (2006). Plato's Symposium and the Traditions of Ancient Fiction. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
     
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  21. J. H. Lesher (2006). Some Notable Afterimages of Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
     
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  22. Mark L. McPherran (2006). Medicine, Magic, and Religion in Plato's Symposium. In J. H. Lesher, Debra Nails & Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 360.0
     
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  23. Frisbee C. C. Sheffield (2006/2009). Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. Oxford University Press.score: 357.0
    Frisbee Sheffield argues that the Symposium has been unduly marginalized by philosophers. Although the topic, eros, and the setting at a symposium have seemed anomalous, she demonstrates that both are intimately related to Plato's preoccupation with the nature of the good life, with virtue, and how it is acquired and transmitted. For Plato, analyzing our desires is a way of reflecting on the kind of people we will turn out to be and on our chances of leading (...)
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  24. Mary P. Nichols (2004). Socrates' Contest with the Poets in Plato's Symposium. Political Theory 32 (2):186-206.score: 357.0
    Scholars have recently argued that in the Symposium Plato is critical of Socrates and falls closer than his philosophic spokesman to the side of poetry in the old quarrel between philosophy and poetry. Contrary to such interpretations, I argue that on the basis of his experience of a philosophic life, Socrates responds to the poets Plato presents in that dialogue, offering a superior understanding not only of Love but of poetry itself Far from self-sufficient, but like Love "dwell[ing] always (...)
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  25. Cristina Ionescu (2007). The Transition From the Lower to the Higher Mysteries of Love in Plato's Symposium. Dialogue 46 (1):27-42.score: 357.0
    In the Symposium Socrates shows how Diotima initiated him into the mysteries of love in two stages. Yet, at first sight, the teachings offered at the two stages seem divergent and discontinuous. In this article I argue that we can understand the continuity between them if we regard Diotima’s notions of spiritual pregnancy and birth-giving as metaphors suggesting that the metaphysical horizon looming in the background of her teaching is that of Plato’s theory of recollection.Socrate explique dans le Banquet (...)
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  26. Mary P. Nichols (2009). Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. Cambridge University Press.score: 357.0
    Introduction -- The problem of Socrates : Kierkegaard and Nietzsche -- Kierkegaard : Socrates vs. the God -- Nietzsche : call for an artistic Socrates -- Plato's Socrates -- Love, generation, and political community (the Symposium) -- The prologue -- Phaedrus' praise of nobility -- Pausanias' praise of law -- Eryximachus' praise of art -- Aristophanic comedy -- Tragic victory -- Socrates' turn -- Socrates' prophetess and the daemonic -- Love as generative -- Alcibiades' dramatic entrance -- Alcibiades' (...)
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  27. Jacob Howland (2007). Plato's Dionysian Music?: A Reading of the Symposium. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):17-47.score: 351.0
    Like Aristophanes’ Frogs, Plato’s Symposium stages a contest between literary genres. The quarrel between Socrates and Aristophanes constitutes the primary axis of this contest, and the speech of Alcibiades echoes and extends that of Aristophanes. Alcibiades’ comparison of Socrates with a satyr, however, contains the key to understanding Socrates’ implication, at the very end of the dialogue, that philosophy alone understands the inner connectedness, and hence the proper nature, of both tragedy and comedy. I argue that Plato reflects in (...)
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  28. Kieran Bonner (2013). Eros and Ironic Intoxication: Profound Longing, Madness and Discipleship in Plato's Symposium and in Modern Life. History of the Human Sciences 26 (5):0952695113479358.score: 351.0
    The Symposium addresses the relation between desire, beauty and the good life, while indicating the fascination that strong teaching arouses in followers. For Plato, unlike for moderns, power, desire and ethics are interrelated. This article takes Socrates as a case study for the Platonic understanding of this interrelation and it will put into play the grounds involved in their modern separation. It focuses on the three speakers in the dialogue who were followers of Socrates as a way of addressing (...)
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  29. Alessandra Fussi (2008). The Desire for Recognition in Plato’s Symposium. Arethusa 41: 237–262.score: 324.0
    The paper argues that thumos, which is never explicitly mentioned as a part of the soul in the Symposium, plays a major role in the dialogue. In light of the Republic’s characterization of thumos as the source of emotions such as of love of honor, love of victory, admiration for courage, shame, anger, and the propensity to become indignant at real or imaginary wrongs, the paper argues that both Phaedrus’ speech and the speech of Alcibiades are shaped by thumoeidetic (...)
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  30. John D. Moore (1973). The Relation Between Plato's Symposium and Phaedrus. In. In J. M. E. Maravcsik (ed.), Patterns in Plato's Thought. Dordrecht,Reidel. 52--71.score: 312.0
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  31. Burt C. Hopkins (2011). The Unwritten Teachings in Plato's Symposium. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):279-298.score: 306.0
    The paper argues that the ontology of Self behind Descartes’s paradigmatic modern account of passion is an obstacle to interpreting properly the account Socrates gives in the Symposium of the truth of Eros’s origin, nature, and gift to the philosophical initiate into his truth. The key to interpreting this account is located in the relation between Eros and the arithmos-structure of the community of kinds, which is disclosed in terms of the Symposium’s dramatic mimesis of the two Platonic (...)
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  32. Arlene W. Saxonhouse (1984). Eros and the Female in Greek Political Thought: An Interpretation of Plato's Symposium. Political Theory 12 (1):5-27.score: 279.0
    They do not understand that being brought apart is carried back together with itself; it is a back-stretching harmony as of the bow and the lyre.Herakleitus, Frag. 51“Tell me, you, the heir of the argument,” I said, “what was it Simonides said about justice that you assert he said correctly?”“That it is just to give to each what is owed,” he said. “In saying this he said a fine thing, at least in my opinion.”Plato, Republic 331e (Bloom translation).
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  33. J. S. Morrison (1964). Four Notes on Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 14 (01):42-.score: 279.0
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  34. Vered Lev Kenaan (2009). The Seductions of Hesiod: Pandora's Presence in Plato's Symposium'. In G. R. Boys-Stones & J. H. Haubold (eds.), Plato and Hesiod. Oup Oxford.score: 279.0
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  35. Trevor J. Saunders & S. Rosen (1970). Plato's Symposium. Journal of Hellenic Studies 90:209.score: 279.0
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  36. Jane S. Zembaty (1990). Alexander Nehamas and Paul Woodruff, Trans., Plato's Symposium Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (1):34-36.score: 279.0
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  37. Suzanne Obdrzalek (2010). Moral Transformation and the Love of Beauty in Plato's Symposium. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):415-444.score: 270.0
    On the day eros was conceived, the gods were having a party to celebrate the birth of Aphrodite. His father-to-be, Poros (resource), was having a grand old time, and in fact got so carried away with the nectar that he passed out cold in Zeus’ garden. His mother-to-be, Penia (poverty), had not made the guest list, and was skulking around the gates. She was poor but cunning, and on seeing Poros sprawled on the ground, hatched a plot to relieve her (...)
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  38. Martha Nussbaum (1979). The Speech of Alcibiades: A Reading of Plato's Symposium. Philosophy and Literature 3 (2):131-172.score: 270.0
  39. Tushar Irani (2009). Review of Mary P. Nichols, Socrates on Friendship and Community: Reflections on Plato's Symposium, Phaedrus, and Lysis. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).score: 270.0
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  40. Robin Waterfield (2008). Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. By Frisbee C.C. Sheffield. Heythrop Journal 49 (3):476–477.score: 270.0
  41. Alessandra Fussi (2008). Plato's Symposium: The Ethics of Desire. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (2):209-211.score: 270.0
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  42. Elizabeth McGrath (1983). 'The Drunken Alcibiades': Rubens's Picture of Plato's Symposium. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 46:228-235.score: 270.0
  43. Steven Berg (2010). Eros and the Intoxications of Enlightenment: On Plato's Symposium. State University of New York Press.score: 270.0
    Author Steven Berg offers an interpretation of this dialogue wherein all the speakers at the banquetwith the exception of Socratesnot only offer their views on ...
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  44. Martin Warner (1979). Love, Self, and Plato's Symposium. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (117):329-339.score: 270.0
  45. F. C. White (2008). Beauty of Soul and Speech in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 58 (01).score: 270.0
  46. David Konstan (2005). Review of Kevin Corrigan, Elena Glazov-Corrigan, Plato's Dialectic at Play: Argument, Structure, and Myth in Plato's Symposium. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (5).score: 270.0
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  47. E. E. Pender (1992). Spiritual Pregnancy in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 42 (01):72-.score: 270.0
  48. Donald N. Blakeley, The Interpersonal Aspect of Eros in Plato's Symposium.score: 270.0
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  49. Ludwig C. H. Chen (1983). Knowledge of Beauty in Plato's Symposium. Classical Quarterly 33 (01):66-.score: 270.0
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