Search results for 'Platonists' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Lloyd P. Gerson (2005). Aristotle and Other Platonists. Cornell University Press.
    Aristotle and Other Platonists concludes with an assessment of some of the philosophical results of acknowledging harmony."--BOOK JACKET.
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  2.  55
    George E. Karamanolis (2006). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. Oxford University Press.
    George Karamanolis breaks new ground in the study of later ancient philosophy by examining the interplay of the two main schools of thought, Platonism and Aristotelianism, from the first century BC to the third century AD. Arguing against prevailing scholarly assumption, he argues that the Platonists turned to Aristotle only in order to elucidate Plato's doctrines and to reconstruct Plato's philosophy, and that they did not hesitate to criticize Aristotle when judging him to be at odds with Plato. Karamanolis (...)
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  3.  4
    C. A. Patrides (1980). The Cambridge Platonists. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume contains the selected discourses of four seventeenth-century philosophers, carefully chosen to illustrate the tenets characteristic of the influential movement known as Cambridge Platonism. Fundamental to their beliefs is the statement most clearly voiced by Benjamin Whichcote, their leader by common consent, that the spiritual is not opposed to the rational, nor Grace to nature. Religion is based on reason, even in the presence of 'mystery'. Free will and Grace are not mutually exclusive. The editor's comprehensive introduction delineates the (...)
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  4.  3
    Frederick J. Powicke (1926). The Cambridge Platonists: A Study. Martino Pub..
    Some characteristics of the Cambridge Platonists -- Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1683) -- John Smith (1616-1652) -- Ralph Cudworth (1617-1685) -- Nathaniel Culverwel (1618?-1651) -- Henry More (1614-1687) -- Peter Sterry (d. 1672).
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  5.  1
    Frederick J. Powicke (1971). The Cambridge Platonists. [Hamden, Conn.]Archon Books.
    Prologue.--Some characteristics of the Cambridge Platonists.--Benjamin Whichcote (1609-1683)--John Smith (1616-1652)--Ralph Cudworth (1617-1685)--Nathaniel Culverwel (1618?-1651)--Henry More (1614-1687)--Peter Sterry (d. 1672)--Epilogue.
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  6. G. A. J. Rogers, Jean-Michel Vienne & Yves Charles Zarka (1997). The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context Politics, Metaphysics, and Religion.
     
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  7.  7
    John M. Dillon (1977). The Middle Platonists: A Study of Platonism, 80 B.C. To A.D. 220. Duckworth.
  8. Eugene Munger Austin (1935). The Ethics of the Cambridge Platonists. Philadelphia.
     
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  9. John John De Boer (1931). The Theory of Knowledge of the Cambridge Platonists. Madras, Methodist Publishing House.
     
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  10.  10
    John M. Dillon (1977). The Middle Platonists, 80 B.C. To A.D. 220. Cornell University Press.
    CHAPTER ONE The Old Academy and the Themes of Middle Platonism Plato, on his death in 347 BC, left behind him a philosophical heritage that has not yet lost ...
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  11.  27
    Ben Lazare Mijuskovic (1974). The Achilles of Rationalist Arguments: The Simplicity, Unity, and Identity of Thought and Soul From the Cambridge Platonists to Kant: A Study in the History of an Argument. Martinus Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION TO THE ARGUMENT AND ITS HISTORY PRIOR TO THE AND CENTURIES In the history of ideas, there is an argument that has been used repeatedly, ...
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  12. Geoffrey Philip Henry Pawson (1930). The Cambridge Platonists and Their Place in Religious Thought. London, Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge.
     
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  13.  43
    Matthew Tugby (2013). Nomic Necessity for Platonists. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (4):324-331.
    After identifying some existing explanations offered by nomic necessitarians for the alleged necessary connections between natural properties and their dispositional or nomic features, I discuss a less explored necessitarian strategy. This strategy is available to Platonists who hold that properties exist necessarily, as most do.
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  14.  34
    William Lane Craig (2011). Why Are Platonists so Insouciant? Philosophy 86 (2):213-229.
    Some platonists truly agonize over the ontological commitments which their platonism demands of them. Peter van Inwagen, for example, confesses candidly, I am happy to admit that I am uneasy about believing in the existence of ???causally irrelevant??? objects. The fact that abstract objects, if they exist, can be neither causes or [ sic ] effects is one of the many features of abstract objects that make nominalism so attractive. I should very much like to be a nominalist, but (...)
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  15.  97
    Thomas Williams, Augustine and the Platonists.
    I start with a story to convey what I think is the essence of the Platonic outlook that Augustine adopts. Then I’ll show you how various Platonists put the insights that this story encapsulates to work in three different aspects of philosophy. After I’ve laid all that out, I’ll talk about how Augustine transforms this Platonic picture in the light of his Christian faith..
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  16.  45
    R. M. Dancy (2008). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement? Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):pp. 634-636.
    Coleridge wrote: “Every man is born an Aristotelian or a Platonist. I do not think it possible that anyone born an Aristotelian can become a Platonist; and I am sure that no born Platonist can ever change into an Aristotelian. They are two classes of man, beside which it is next to impossible to conceive a third.”Ancient Platonists could not be counted on to accept this kind of dichotomy, and that is what Karamanolis’s book is about. It covers Antiochus (...)
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  17.  5
    Robert L. Armstrong (1969). Cambridge Platonists and Locke on Innate Ideas. Journal of the History of Ideas 30 (2):191-205.
    The cambridge platonists exemplify the fear that newtonian natural philosophy subverts the status of traditional moral and religious beliefs, Which are strongly supported by the innate idea doctrine since it justifies them independently of the senses and the material universe. Isaac barrow, Friend and teacher of newton, Also employs the doctrine approbatively to support his metaphysics as a science of basic principles that constitute the foundation of natural science. Locke's rejection of the doctrine is analyzed and it is suggested (...)
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  18.  19
    Deborah K. W. Modrak (2006). Aristotle and Other Platonists (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):315-317.
    Deborah K. W. Modrak - Aristotle and Other Platonists - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.2 315-317 Lloyd P. Gerson. Aristotle and Other Platonists. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 2005. Pp. ix + 335. Cloth, $49.95. This book is a heroic effort to defend the thesis that the Neoplatonists' embrace of Aristotle as another Platonist is well grounded in Aristotle's own texts and not a product of Neoplatonic eclecticism. If (...)
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  19.  6
    Ruth Ap Roberts (forthcoming). Arnold and Cambridge Platonists. Clio.
    Matthew arnold maintains in the nineteenth century the renaissance school of the cambridge platonists. for them, reason and religion are by no means at odds: reason is in fact "the candle of the lord." for matthew arnold in "literature and dogma", christianity will prevail only by being shorn of its supernaturalist elements and set on its true rational ground. ernst cassirer has shown how the cambridge platonists bridge the gap between the italian renaissance and the german humanists of (...)
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  20. Eyjólfur Emilsson (2006). George E. Karamanolis, Plato and Aristotle in Agreement: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2006. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:345-348.
    A review of George E. Karamanolis, Plato and Aristotle in Agreement: Platonists on Aristotle from Antiochus to Porphyry, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2006.
     
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  21. R. M. Dancy (2008). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement? Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (4):634-636.
    Coleridge wrote: “Every man is born an Aristotelian or a Platonist. I do not think it possible that anyone born an Aristotelian can become a Platonist; and I am sure that no born Platonist can ever change into an Aristotelian. They are two classes of man, beside which it is next to impossible to conceive a third.”Ancient Platonists could not be counted on to accept this kind of dichotomy, and that is what Karamanolis’s book is about. It covers Antiochus (...)
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  22. George E. Karamanolis (2006). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. Oxford University Press Uk.
    George Karamanolis breaks new ground in the study of later ancient philosophy by examining the interplay of the two main schools of thought, Platonism and Aristotelianism, from the first century BC to the third century AD. From the time of Antiochus and for the next four centuries Platonists were strongly preoccupied with the question of how Aristotle's philosophy compared with the Platonic model. Scholars have usually classified Platonists into two groups, the orthodox ones and the eclectics or syncretists, (...)
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  23. George E. Karamanolis (2013). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. Oxford University Press Uk.
    George Karamanolis breaks new ground in the study of later ancient philosophy by examining the interplay of the two main schools of thought, Platonism and Aristotelianism, from the first century BC to the third century AD. From the time of Antiochus and for the next four centuries Platonists were strongly preoccupied with the question of how Aristotle's philosophy compared with the Platonic model. Scholars have usually classified Platonists into two groups, the orthodox ones and the eclectics or syncretists, (...)
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  24. George E. Karamanolis (2013). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. OUP Oxford.
    George Karamanolis examines the interplay of the two main schools of thought in ancient philosophy, Platonism and Aristotelianism. He argues, against prevailing scholarly views, that the Platonists turned to Aristotle only in order to elucidate Plato's doctrines, and did not hesitate to criticize Aristotle when judging him to be at odds with Plato.
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  25.  22
    Jacob Busch & Joe Morrison, Should Scientific Realists Be Platonists?
    Enhanced Indispensability Arguments claim that Scientific Realists are committed to the existence of mathematical entities due to their reliance on Inference to the Best Explana- tion. Our central question concerns this purported parity of reasoning: do people who defend the EIA make an appropriate use of the resources of Scientific Realism to achieve platonism? We argue that just because a variety of different inferential strategies can be employed by Scientific Realists does not mean that ontological conclusions concerning which things we (...)
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  26.  82
    Jacob Busch & Joe Morrison (2016). Should Scientific Realists Be Platonists? Synthese 193 (2):435-449.
    Enhanced indispensability arguments claim that Scientific Realists are committed to the existence of mathematical entities due to their reliance on Inference to the best explanation. Our central question concerns this purported parity of reasoning: do people who defend the EIA make an appropriate use of the resources of Scientific Realism to achieve platonism? We argue that just because a variety of different inferential strategies can be employed by Scientific Realists does not mean that ontological conclusions concerning which things we should (...)
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  27. Jon Cogburn & Jason Megill (2010). Are Turing Machines Platonists? Inferentialism and the Computational Theory of Mind. Minds and Machines 20 (3):423-439.
    We first discuss Michael Dummett’s philosophy of mathematics and Robert Brandom’s philosophy of language to demonstrate that inferentialism entails the falsity of Church’s Thesis and, as a consequence, the Computational Theory of Mind. This amounts to an entirely novel critique of mechanism in the philosophy of mind, one we show to have tremendous advantages over the traditional Lucas-Penrose argument.
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  28. John Russell Roberts (2012). Whichcote and the Cambridge Platonists on Human Nature: An Interpretation and Defense. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy VI.
    Draft version of essay. ABSTRACT: Benjamin Whichcote developed a distinctive account of human nature centered on our moral psychology. He believed that this view of human nature, which forms the foundation of “Cambridge Platonism,” showed that the demands of reason and faith are not merely compatible but dynamically supportive of one another. I develop an interpretation of this oft-neglected and widely misunderstood account of human nature and defend its viability against a key objection.
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  29. D. P. Walker (1953). Orpheus the Theologian and Renaissance Platonists. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 16 (1/2):100-120.
  30.  22
    E. A. Burtt (1928). The Cambridge Platonists. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 25 (24):668-669.
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  31.  64
    Sam Baron (2013). Can Indispensability‐Driven Platonists Be (Serious) Presentists? Theoria 79 (3):153-173.
    In this article I consider what it would take to combine a certain kind of mathematical Platonism with serious presentism. I argue that a Platonist moved to accept the existence of mathematical objects on the basis of an indispensability argument faces a significant challenge if she wishes to accept presentism. This is because, on the one hand, the indispensability argument can be reformulated as a new argument for the existence of past entities and, on the other hand, if one accepts (...)
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  32. J. H. Muirhead (1927). The Cambridge Platonists (I). Mind 36 (142):158-178.
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  33.  86
    Riin Sirkel (2008). Aristotle and Other Platonists – by Lloyd P. Gerson. Theoria 74 (1):91-95.
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  34.  13
    O. D. (1978). The Middle Platonists 80 B.C. To A.D. 220. Review of Metaphysics 31 (3):475-476.
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  35.  25
    Alan C. Bowen (1983). Menaechmus Versus the Platonists. Ancient Philosophy 3 (1):12-29.
  36.  13
    Arthur Madigan (1979). The Middle Platonists. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):107-108.
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  37.  42
    J. H. Muirhead (1927). The Cambridge Platonists (II). Mind 36 (143):326-341.
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  38. Rudolf De Smet & Karin Verelst (2001). Newton's Scholium Generale: The Platonic and Stoic Legacy — Philo, Justus Lipsius and the Cambridge Platonists. History of Science 39 (123):30.
  39.  15
    Michael Ewbank (2007). Plato and Aristotle in Agreement?: Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):870-872.
  40.  11
    Michael Ewbank (2005). Aristotle and Other Platonists. Review of Metaphysics 59 (1):175-178.
  41.  7
    E. M. Curley (1971). The Cambridge Platonists. Philosophical Studies 20:368-369.
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  42.  7
    Dominic Scott, Reason, Recollection and the Cambridge Platonists.
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  43.  22
    J. Athanasius Weisheipl (1958). Albertus Magnus and the Oxford Platonists. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 32:124-139.
  44.  4
    G. B. R. (1919). The Neo-Platonists. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (7-8):164-164.
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  45.  4
    G. B. R. (1919). The Neo-Platonists. By Thomas Whittaker. (Second Edition). One Volume. 8vo. Pp. Xv + 318. Cambridge: University Press, 1918. 23s Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (7-8):164-.
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  46.  15
    Jeffrey Edwards (2000). The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context. Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):727-728.
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  47.  3
    R. L. Colie (1959). Light and Enlightenment: A Study of the Cambridge Platonists and the Dutch Arminians. Philosophical Review 68 (1):131-132.
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  48.  20
    G. R. Boys-Stones (2007). Review: Plato and Aristotle in Agreement? Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (464):1129-1132.
  49.  14
    Rosamond Kent Sprague (2007). Aristotle and Other Platonists, by Lloyd P. Gerson. Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):429-432.
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  50.  25
    Lloyd P. Gerson (2006). Review of George E. Karamanolis, Plato and Aristotle in Agreement? Platonists on Aristotle From Antiochus to Porphyry. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (10).
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