Search results for 'Please Delete' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Please Delete, Please Delete. This is a Duplicate.score: 2040.0
  2. Please Delete, Double Please Delete.score: 2040.0
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  3. Robin James (2013). From "No Future" to "Delete Yourself (You Have No Chance To Win)&Quot;. Journal of Popular Music Studies 25 (4).score: 18.0
    Beginning with the role of the Sex Pistols’s (1977) “God Save the Queen” in Lee Edelman (2004) and J. Jack Halberstam’s (2010) debates about queer death and failure, I follow a musical motive (the main guitar riff) from the Pistols track to its reappearance in Atari Teenage Riot’s (ATR’s) 1995 “Delete Yourself (You Have No Chance To Win).” In this song, as in much of ATR’s work from the 1990s, overlapping (and often appropriated) queer and Afro-diasporic aesthetics condense around (...)
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  4. Matthew Smith (2009). Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):369-373.score: 18.0
    Viktor Mayer-Schönberger, Delete: the virtue of forgetting in the digital age Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s12394-010-0039-x Authors Matthew L. span class=’Hi’ > Smith /span > , International Development Research Centre Ottawa Canada Journal Identity in the Information Society Online ISSN 1876-0678 Journal Volume Volume 2 Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3.
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  5. Karen Spaceinvaders (2011). Please Mind the Gap: How To Podcast Your Brain. Continent 1 (2):76-77.score: 18.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 76-77. Please click to listen to the mp3 files of deep brain recordings of individual brain cells, the smallest unit of the brain, in a whole, intact living brain. Each brain region’s cells possess an electrical signature. During recordings electrical signals are transformed into sound to facilitate auditory identification of cells during a process called “mapping.” Subthalamic nucleus by continent Cortex by continent Mapping is an important step in successfully identifying and localizing the appropriate target site (...)
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  6. Jeanette Kennett & Cordelia Fine (2009). Will the Real Moral Judgment Please Stand Up? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):77–96.score: 15.0
    The recent, influential Social Intuitionist Model of moral judgment (Haidt, Psychological Review 108, 814–834, 2001) proposes a primary role for fast, automatic and affectively charged moral intuitions in the formation of moral judgments. Haidt’s research challenges our normative conception of ourselves as agents capable of grasping and responding to reasons. We argue that there can be no ‘real’ moral judgments in the absence of a capacity for reflective shaping and endorsement of moral judgments. However, we suggest that the empirical literature (...)
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  7. Bryan Frances, Please Explain What a Rigid Designator Is”.score: 15.0
    This is an essay written for undergraduates who are confused about what a rigid designator is.
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  8. Robert P. Farrell (2000). Will the Popperian Feyerabend Please Step Forward: Pluralistic, Popperian Themes in the Philosophy of Paul Feyerabend. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (3):257 – 266.score: 15.0
    John Preston has claimed that we must understand Paul Feyerabend's later, post-1970, philosophy in terms of a disappointed Popperianism: that Feyerabend became a sceptical, relativistic, literal anarchist because of his perception of the failure of Popper's philosophy. I argue that this claim cannot be supported and trace the development of Feyerabend's philosophy in terms of a commitment to the central Popperian themes of criticism and critical explanatory progress. This commitment led Feyerabend to reject Popper's specific methodology in favour of a (...)
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  9. Jan Willem Wieland (2012). Carving the World As We Please. Philosophica 84 (1):7-24.score: 15.0
    Nelson Goodman defends the seemingly radical view that, in a certain sense, all facts depend on our perspective on the matter. We make the world, rather than merely find it. The aim of this contribution is three-fold: to make sense of Goodman's metaphysical perspectivalism, clearly explain how it differs from other branches of perspectivalism (epistemic and semantic), and put two issues on the agenda that deserve renewed attention.
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  10. Maria Kronfeldner (2010). Won't You Please Unite? Darwinism, Cultural Evolution and Kinds of Synthesis. In A. Barahona, H.-J. Rheinberger & E. Suarez-Diaz (eds.), The Hereditary Hourglass: Genetics and Epigenetics, 1868-2000. Max Planck Insititute for the History of Science. 111-125.score: 15.0
    The synthetic theory of evolution has gone stale and an expanding or (re-)widening of it towards a new synthesis has been announced. This time, development and culture are supposed to join the synthesis bandwagon. In this article, I distinguish between four kinds of synthesis that are involved when we extend the evolutionary synthesis towards culture: the integration of fields, the heuristic generation of interfields, the expansion of validity, and the creation of a common frame of discourse or ‘big-picture’. These kinds (...)
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  11. Amy Coplan (2011). Will the Real Empathy Please Stand Up? A Case for a Narrow Conceptualization. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):40-65.score: 15.0
    A longstanding problem with the study of empathy is the lack of a clear and agreed upon definition. A trend in the recent literature is to respond to this problem by advancing a broad and all-encompassing view of empathy that applies to myriad processes ranging from mimicry and imitation to high-level perspective taking. I argue that this response takes us in the wrong direction and that what we need in order to better understand empathy is a narrower conceptualization, not a (...)
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  12. Louise Antony (1995). Sisters, Please, I'd Rather Do It Myself. Philosophical Topics 23 (2):59-94.score: 15.0
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  13. Andrew Boucher, The Existence of Numbers (Or: What is the Status of Arithmetic?) By V2.00 Created: 11 Oct 2001 Modified: 3 June 2002 Please Send Your Comments to Abo. [REVIEW]score: 15.0
    I begin with a personal confession. Philosophical discussions of existence have always bored me. When they occur, my eyes glaze over and my attention falters. Basically ontological questions often seem best decided by banging on the table--rocks exist, fairies do not. Argument can appear long-winded and miss the point. Sometimes a quick distinction resolves any apparent difficulty. Does a falling tree in an earless forest make noise, ie does the noise exist? Well, if noise means that an ear must be (...)
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  14. Philippe H. Martin (1997). "If You Don't Know How to Fix It, Please Stop Breaking It!" The Precautionary Principle and Climate Change. Foundations of Science 2 (2):263-292.score: 15.0
    Taking precautions to prevent harm. Whether principe de précaution, Vorsorgeprinzip, føre-var prinsippet, or försiktighetsprincip, etc., the precautionary principle embodies the idea that public and private interests should act to prevent harm. Furthermore, the precautionary principle suggests that action should be taken to limit, regulate, or prevent potentially dangerous undertakings even in the absence of absolute scientific proof. Such measures also naturally entail taking economic costs into account. With the environmental disasters of the 1980s, the precautionary principle established itself as an (...)
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  15. Mark Sheehan & Michael Dunn (2010). No Sex Please, We're Social Scientists? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):39-41.score: 15.0
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  16. Michael Tomasello (2001). Could We Please Lose the Mapping Metaphor, Please? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1119-1120.score: 15.0
    Although Bloom gives more credit to social cognition (mind reading) than do most other theorists of word learning, he does not go far enough. He still relies fundamentally on a learning process of association (or mapping), neglecting the joint attentional and cultural learning skills from which linguistic communication emerges at one year of age.
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  17. Ilina Singh (2005). Will the "Real Boy" Please Behave: Dosing Dilemmas for Parents of Boys with ADHD. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):34 – 47.score: 15.0
    The use of Ritalin and other stimulant drug treatments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) raises distinctive moral dilemmas for parents; these moral dilemmas have not been adequately addressed in the bioethics literature. This paper draws upon data from a qualitative empirical study to investigate parents' use of the moral ideal of authenticity as part of their narrative justifications for dosing decisions and actions. I show that therapeutic decisions and actions are embedded in valued cultural ideals about masculinity, self-actualization and success, (...)
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  18. Alberto Artosi (2010). Please Don't Use Science or Mathematics in Arguing for Human Rights or Natural Law. Ratio Juris 23 (3):311-332.score: 15.0
    In the vast literature on human rights and natural law one finds arguments that draw on science or mathematics to support claims to universality and objectivity. Here are two such arguments: 1) Human rights are as universal (i.e., valid independently of their specific historical and cultural Western origin) as the laws and theories of science; and 2) principles of natural law have the same objective (metahistorical) validity as mathematical principles. In what follows I will examine these arguments in some detail (...)
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  19. John Richard Harris & Richard Galvin (2012). 'Pass the Cocoamone, Please': Causal Impotence, Opportunistic Vegetarianism and Act-Utilitarianism. Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (3):368 - 383.score: 15.0
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  20. Daniel D. Hutto & Erik Myin (2014). Neural Representations Not Needed - No More Pleas, Please. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):241-256.score: 15.0
    Colombo (Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 2012) argues that we have compelling reasons to posit neural representations because doing so yields unique explanatory purchase in central cases of social norm compliance. We aim to show that there is no positive substance to Colombo’s plea—nothing that ought to move us to endorse representationalism in this domain, on any level. We point out that exposing the vices of the phenomenological arguments against representationalism does not, on its own, advance the case for representationalism (...)
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  21. Jerry Fodor & Ernie Lepore, Morphemes Matter; the Continuing Case Against Lexical Decomposition (Or: Please Don't Play That Again, Sam).score: 15.0
    The idea that quotidian, middle-level concepts typically have internal structure -- definitional, statistical, or whatever -- plays a central role in practically every current approach to cognition. Correspondingly, the idea that words that express quotidian, middle-level concepts have complex representations "at the semantic level" is recurrent in linguistics; it's the defining thesis of what is often called "lexical semantics," and it unites the generative and interpretive traditions of grammatical analysis. Recently, Hale and Keyser (1993) have provided a budget of sophisticated (...)
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  22. Jaakko Kuorikoski, Aki Lehtinen & Caterina Marchionni (2012). Robustness Analysis Disclaimer: Please Read the Manual Before Use! Biology and Philosophy 27 (6):891-902.score: 15.0
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  23. Yves Gingras (2007). "Please, Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood": The Role of Argumentation in a Sociology of Academic Misunderstandings. Social Epistemology 21 (4):369 – 389.score: 15.0
    Academic debates are so frequent and omnipresent in most disciplines, particularly the social sciences and humanities, it seems obvious that disagreements are bound to occur. The aim of this paper is to show that whereas the agent who perceives his/her contribution as being misunderstood locates the origin of the communication problem on the side of the receiver who "misinterprets" the text, the emitter is in fact also contributing to the possibility of this misunderstanding through the very manner in which his/her (...)
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  24. Andrew Crane (1999). Are You Ethical? Please Tick Yes □ or No □ on Researching Ethics in Business Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):237 - 248.score: 15.0
    This paper seeks to explore the empirical agenda of business ethics research from a methodological perspective. It is argued that the quality of empirical research in the field remains relatively poor and unconvincing. Drawing on the distinctions between the two main philosophical positions from which methodologies in the social sciences are derived – positivism and interpretism – it is argued that it is business ethics' tradition of positivist, and highly quantitative approaches which may be at the root of these epistemological (...)
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  25. Daniel C. Dennett (2013). Please Don't Feed the Bugbears. In Paul Russell & Oisin Deery (eds.), The Philosophy of Free Will: Essential Readings From the Contemporary Debates. Oup Usa. 43.score: 15.0
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  26. Thomas Cochrane & Matt T. Bianchi (2011). “Take My Organs, Please”: A Section of My Living Will. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):56-58.score: 15.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 56-58, August 2011.
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  27. Waheed Hussain (2009). No More Lemmings, Please - Reflections on the Communal Authority Thesis. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):717 - 728.score: 15.0
    A key feature of ISCT is the claim that individuals are required to comply with the norms that are "accepted by a clear majority of the community as standing for an ethical principle" [Donaldson and Dunfee, 1999, "The Ties that Bind" (Harvard Business School Press, Boson, MA), p. 39], so long as these norms are consistent with hypernorms. I refer to this as the communal authority thesis. Many people see the communal authority thesis as an attractive feature of ISCT, a (...)
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  28. Denis Dutton (1997). Please Shoot the Piano Player!: The Debate Over David Helfgott. Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):332-391.score: 15.0
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  29. S. D. John (2012). No Genes, Please: We're British. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (4):828-830.score: 15.0
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  30. Paul B. Miller & Charles Weijer (2003). Will the Real Charles Fried Please Stand Up? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):353-357.score: 15.0
    : In response to the preceding commentary by Jerry Menikoff in this issue of the Journal , the authors argue that Fried's central concern is not that randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are conducted without consent, but rather that various aspects of the design and conduct of RCTs are in tension with physicians' duties of personal care to their patients. Although Fried does argue that the existence of equipoise cannot justify failure to obtain consent from research subjects, informed consent by itself (...)
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  31. Ilina Singh (2005). Response to Commentators on “Will the 'Real Boy' Please Behave: Dosing Dilemmas for Parents of Boys with ADHD”. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):W10-W12.score: 15.0
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  32. Tommy J. Curry (2007). Please Don't Make Me Touch 'Em. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:133-158.score: 15.0
    The unchanging realities of race relations in the United States, recently highlighted by the catastrophe of Hurricane Katrina, demonstrate that Black Americans are still not viewed, treated or protected as citizens in this country. The rates of poverty, disease and incarceration in Black communities have been recognized by some Critical Race Theorists as genocidal acts. Despite the appeal to the international community’s interpretation of human rights, Blacks are still the most impoverished and lethally targeted group in America. Given the “white (...)
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  33. Michael Dunn & Mark Sheehan (2010). No Sex Please, We're Social Scientists? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):39-41.score: 15.0
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  34. Adrienne M. Martin, Please Cite Published Version.score: 15.0
    In their classic, Principles of Biomedical Ethics (now in its fifth edition), Beauchamp and Childress, describe a puzzling case: A man who generally exhibits normal behavior patterns is involuntarily committed to a mental institution as the result of bizarre self-destructive behavior (pulling out an eye and cutting off a hand). This behavior results from his unusual religious beliefs. … [H]is peculiar actions follow “reasonably” from his religious beliefs. …While analysis in terms of limited competence might at first appear plausible, such (...)
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  35. Magali Bessone (2013). Will the Real Tolerant Racist Please Stand Up? Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (3):209-223.score: 15.0
    One of the most perplexing paradoxes of toleration concerns the ‘tolerant racist’. According to most current definitions of toleration, a person is considered tolerant if, and only if, 1) he refrains from interfering with something 2) he deeply disapproves of, 3) in spite of having the power to interfere. Hence, a racist who refrains from discriminating against members of races he considers inferior despite having the power to do so, should be considered a tolerant person. Moreover, a person can apparently (...)
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  36. Andy Clark (2002). Anchors Not Inner Codes, Coordination Not Translation (and Hold the Modules Please). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):681-681.score: 15.0
    Peter Carruthers correctly argues for a cognitive conception of the role of language. But such a story need not include the excess baggage of compositional inner codes, mental modules, mentalese, or translation into logical form (LF).
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  37. Peter Machamer, Please Scroll Down for Article.score: 15.0
    This article may be used for research, teaching and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproduction, re-distribution, re-selling, loan or sub-licensing, systematic supply or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden.
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  38. Roger Sansom (2003). Now, Would Each Group Please Select a Religion. Biology and Philosophy 18 (5):743-750.score: 15.0
  39. Andrew Boucher, Consistency and Existence by V1.00 Last Updated: 1 Oct 2000 Please Send Your Comments to Abo.score: 15.0
    On the one hand, first-order theories are able to assert the existence of objects. For instance, ZF set theory asserts the existence of objects called the power set, while Peano Arithmetic asserts the existence of zero. On the other hand, a first-order theory may or not be consistent: it is if and only if no contradiction is a theorem. Let us ask, What is the connection between consistency and existence?
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  40. Deborah Hansen Soles (1996). Will the Real Description Theory of Names Please Stand Up? Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):151-160.score: 15.0
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  41. C. Abel, T. Fuller, W. Aiken, J. Haldane, E. Alliez, W. P. Alston, G. E. M. Anscombe, R. Ariew, D. Des Chene & D. M. Jesseph (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received, and Many of Them Are Available for Review. Interested Reviewers Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (4):543 - 551.score: 15.0
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  42. Matthew Adler, Peter Alces, Larry Alexander, Susan Bandes, Saba Bazargan, Vera Bergelson, Mitchell Berman, Brian Bix, Gabriella Blum & Jeffrey Brand-Ballard (2012). Please Join Us in Thanking All of Those Experts in Law and Philosophy for Devoting Time and Effort to Review the Papers We Have Sent Them. The Editor and Publisher Acknowledge the Colleagues Listed Below for Their Excellent Reviews of Papers for Which Final Decisions Have Been Made in 2011. Law and Philosophy 31:367-368.score: 15.0
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  43. Tessa E. Basford, Lynn R. Offermann & Tara S. Behrend (2014). Please Accept My Sincerest Apologies: Examining Follower Reactions to Leader Apology. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):99-117.score: 15.0
    Recognizing gaps in our present understanding of leader apologies, this investigation examines how followers appraise leader apologies and how these perceptions impact work-related outcomes. Results indicate that followers who viewed their leader as trustworthy or caring before a leader wrongdoing were more likely to perceive their leader’s apology to be sincere, as compared to followers who previously doubted their leader’s trustworthiness and caring. Attributions of apology sincerity affected follower reactions, with followers perceiving sincere apologies reporting greater trust in leadership, satisfaction (...)
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  44. Jonathan Herring & Charles Foster (2012). Please Don't Tell Me”. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (01):20-29.score: 15.0
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  45. Jean Kazez (2007). More Happiness Please. Philosophy Now 61:28-30.score: 15.0
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  46. Helen E. Longino (2013). Data, Please. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):144-146.score: 15.0
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  47. Adriaan Spruyt (forthcoming). Attention Please: Evaluative Priming Effects in a Valent/Non-Valent Categorisation Task (Reply to Werner & Rothermund, 2013). Cognition and Emotion:1-10.score: 15.0
  48. John Abromeit, Mark W. Cobb, Lilian Alweiss, Susan J. Armstrong, Richard G. Botzler, Ronald Aronson, Robin Attfield, Gordon Baker, Katherine Morris & Etienne Balibar (unknown). The Following Books Have Been Received and Are Available for Review. Please Contact the Reviews Editor: Jim. Oshea@ Ucd. Ie. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):517 - 523.score: 15.0
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  49. Bridget Haire (2010). No Sex Please in Sexuality Research. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):43-44.score: 15.0
  50. J. Harris (2005). No Sex Selection Please, We're British. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (5):286-288.score: 15.0
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