Search results for 'Political rights' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dean J. Machin (2013). Political Inequality and the 'Super-Rich': Their Money or (Some of) Their Political Rights. Res Publica 19 (2):121-139.score: 240.0
    The ability of very wealthy individuals (or, as I will call them, the ‘super-rich’) to turn their economic power into political power has been—and remains—an important cause of political inequality. In response, this paper advocates an original solution. Rather than solving the problem through implementing a comprehensive conception of political equality, or through enforcing complex rules about financial disclosure etc., I argue that we should impose a choice on the super-rich. The super-rich must choose between (i) forfeiting (...)
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  2. Fernando Arlettaz (2013). Minority Rights in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: Conceptual Considerations. Jurisprudence 20 (3):901-922.score: 240.0
    The article discusses the rights of minorities in the system of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It establishes a conceptual distinction between universal rights, specific rights of minorities in general and specific rights of particular minorities. Universal rights correspond to all individuals (e,g,, “no one shall be subjected to torture”) or all groups of a certain class (e.g., “all families are entitled to protection”). Minority groups and their members are entitled (...)
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  3. Toma Birmontienė & Virginija Jurėnienė (2009). Development of Women's Rights in Lithuania: Recognition of Women Political Rights. Jurisprudence 116 (2):23-44.score: 240.0
    The article discusses the problems of development of women’s political rights in Lithuania in the legal historical aspect starting from the 16th century, when some property and individual rights were enshrined in the first codifications of the laws of the Great Duchy of Lithuania. The aim of the article is to show that women’s struggle for political equality and suffrage at the end of the 19th and at the turn of the 20th century correlates with the (...)
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  4. Pablo Gilabert (2011). Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. Political Theory 39 (4):439-467.score: 198.0
    This essay explores the relation between two perspectives on the nature of human rights. According to the "political" or "practical" perspective, human rights are claims that individuals have against certain institutional structures, in particular modern states, in virtue of interests they have in contexts that include them. According to the more traditional "humanist" or "naturalistic" perspective, human rights are pre-institutional claims that individuals have against all other individuals in virtue of interests characteristic of their common humanity. (...)
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  5. Pablo Gilabert (2013). The Capability Approach and the Debate Between Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. A Critical Survey. Human Rights Review 14 (4):299-325.score: 198.0
    This paper provides a critical exploration of the capability approach to human rights (CAHR) with the specific aim of developing its potential for achieving a synthesis between “humanist” or “naturalistic” and “political” or “practical” perspectives in the philosophy of human rights. Section II presents a general strategy for achieving such a synthesis. Section III provides an articulation of the key insights of CAHR (its focus on actual realizations given diverse circumstances, its pluralism of grounds, its emphasis on (...)
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  6. Benedict S. B. Chan (2014). A Human Rights Debate on Physical Security, Political Liberty, and the Confucian Tradition. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (4):567-588.score: 198.0
    There are many East and West debates on human rights. One of them is whether all civil and political rights are human rights. On one hand, scholars generally agree that rights to physical security are human rights. On the other hand, some scholars argue that rights to political liberty are only Western rights but not human rights because political liberty conflicts with some East Asian cultural factors, especially the Confucian (...)
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  7. Steven D. Roper & Lilian A. Barria (2009). Political Science Perspectives on Human Rights. Human Rights Review 10 (3):305-308.score: 198.0
    This special issue of Human Rights Review is devoted to an exploration of the current human rights research agendas within the political science discipline. Research on human rights is truly an interdisciplinary quest in which various epistemologies can contribute to each other and form a larger dialogue concerning rights and wrongs. This special issue is devoted to an expansive understanding of the state of research on human rights in the political science discipline. One (...)
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  8. Andreas Føllesdal (2009). Universal Human Rights as a Shared Political Identity Impossible? Necessary? Sufficient? Metaphilosophy 40 (1):77-91.score: 192.0
    Abstract: Would a global commitment to international human rights norms provide enough of a sense of community to sustain a legitimate and sufficiently democratic global order? Sceptics worry that human rights cannot help maintain the mutual trust among citizens required for a legitimate political order, since such rights are now too broadly shared. Thus prominent contributors to democratic theory insist that the members of the citizenry must share some features unique to them, to the exclusion of (...)
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  9. S. Matthew Liao & Adam Etinson (2012). Political and Naturalistic Conceptions of Human Rights: A False Polemic? Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (3):327-352.score: 192.0
    What are human rights? According to one longstanding account, the Naturalistic Conception of human rights, human rights are those that we have simply in virtue of being human. In recent years, however, a new and purportedly alternative conception of human rights has become increasingly popular. This is the so-called Political Conception of human rights, the proponents of which include John Rawls, Charles Beitz, and Joseph Raz. In this paper we argue for three claims. First, (...)
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  10. Fabrizio Sciacca (2010). Rights, Pluralism and Education in Europe - A Political-Philosophical Approach. In Hauke Brunkhorst & Gerd Grözinger (eds.), The Study of Europe. Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft.score: 174.0
    " This Volume tries to cover some important parts of the whole spectrum of European Studies. The essay of Fabrizio Sciacca begins with the issue of human rights. Sciacca relates the development of human rights regimes within the European Union to the general question of human rights education, without which human rights must keep abstract legality" (Hauke Brunkhorst, Preface).
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  11. Walter J. Nicholls (2014). From Political Opportunities to Niche-Openings: The Dilemmas of Mobilizing for Immigrant Rights in Inhospitable Environments. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 43 (1):23-49.score: 168.0
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  12. Kristian Skagen Ekeli (2012). The Political Rights of Anti-Liberal-Democratic Groups. Law and Philosophy 31 (3):269-297.score: 162.0
    The purpose of this paper is to consider whether it is permissible for a liberal democratic state to deny anti-liberal-democratic citizens and groups the right to run for parliament. My answer to this question is twofold. On the one hand, I will argue that it is, in principle, permissible for liberal democratic states to deny anti-liberal-democratic citizens and groups the right to run for parliament. On the other hand, I will argue that it is rarely wise (or prudent) for ripe (...)
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  13. Carol C. Gould (2009). Structuring Global Democracy: Political Communities, Universal Human Rights, and Transnational Representation. Metaphilosophy 40 (1):24-41.score: 156.0
    Abstract: The emergence of cross-border communities and transnational associations requires new ways of thinking about the norms involved in democracy in a globalized world. Given the significance of human rights fulfillment, including social and economic rights, I argue here for giving weight to the claims of political communities while also recognizing the need for input by distant others into the decisions of global governance institutions that affect them. I develop two criteria for addressing the scope of democratization (...)
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  14. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 156.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to human societies and (...)
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  15. Florian Wettstein (2010). The Duty to Protect: Corporate Complicity, Political Responsibility, and Human Rights Advocacy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):33 - 47.score: 156.0
    Recent years have heralded increasing attention to the role of multinational corporations in regard to human rights violations. The concept of complicity has been of particular interest in this regard. This article explores the conceptual differences between silent complicity in particular and other, more "conventional" forms of complicity. Despite their far-reaching normative implications, these differences are often overlooked.Rather than being connected to specific actions as is the case for other forms of complicity, the concept of silent complicity is tied (...)
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  16. Corey Brettschneider (2007). The Rights of the Guilty: Punishment and Political Legitimacy. Political Theory 35 (2):175-199.score: 156.0
    In this essay I develop and defend a theory of state punishment within a wider conception of political legitimacy. While many moral theories of punishment focus on what is deserved by criminals, I theorize punishment within the specific context of the state's relationship to its citizens. Central to my account is Rawls's “liberal principle of legitimacy,” which requires that all state coercion be justifiable to all citizens. I extend this idea to the justification of political coercion to criminals (...)
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  17. Alex Sager (2012). Political Rights, Republican Freedom, and Temporary Workers. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy (2):1-23.score: 156.0
  18. Michael C. Davis (ed.) (1995). Human Rights and Chinese Values: Legal, Philosophical, and Political Perspectives. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    In March 1993, in preparation for the United Nations World Conference on Human Rights, representatives from the states of Asia gathered in Bangkok to formulate their position on this emotive issue. The result of their discussions was the Bangkok declaration. They accepted the concept of universal standards in human rights, but declared that these standards could not overridet he unique Asian regional and cultural differences, the requirements of economic development, nor the privileges of sovereignty. : The difficult and (...)
     
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  19. Helen Hershkoff (2007). Alex Conte, Scott Davidson, and Richard Burchill, Defining Civil and Political Rights: The Jurisprudence of the United Nations Human Rights Committee. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 8 (3):277-280.score: 156.0
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  20. Laura Valentini (2012). Human Rights, Freedom, and Political Authority. Political Theory 40 (5):573 - 601.score: 150.0
    In this article, I sketch a Kant-inspired liberal account of human rights: the freedom-centred view. This account conceptualizes human rights as entitlements that any political authority—any state in the first instance—must secure to qualify as a guarantor of its subjects' innate right to freedom. On this picture, when a state (or state-like institution) protects human rights, it reasonably qualifies as a moral agent to be treated with respect. By contrast, when a state (or state-like institution) fails (...)
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  21. John Deigh (2013). Human Rights as Political Rights: A Critique. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (1):22-42.score: 150.0
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  22. W. T. Blackstone (1971). On “Basic Political Rights”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):85-89.score: 150.0
  23. Jenna Reinbold (2011). Political Myth and the Sacred Center of Human Rights: The Universal Declaration and the Narrative of “Inherent Human Dignity”. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (2):147-171.score: 150.0
    This paper will explore the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights as an exemplar of political mythmaking, a genre of narrative designed to channel and thereby to quell social anxiety and to orient select groups toward desirable beliefs and practices. One of the Declaration’s most fundamental and forceful elements is its enshrinement of the “inherent dignity” of each member of the human family. Drawing upon contemporary theorizations of mythmaking and sacralization, this article will elucidate the manner in which (...)
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  24. Luba Racanska (1996). Economic and Political Rights for Women in the Czech and Slovak Republics. The European Legacy 1 (3):1031-1036.score: 150.0
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  25. Massimo La Torre (2005). Global Citizenship? Political Rights Under Imperial Conditions. Ratio Juris 18 (2):236-257.score: 150.0
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  26. James Bohman (forthcoming). Constituting Humanity: Universal Political Rights and the Human Community. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.score: 150.0
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  27. David G. Ritchie (1896). Book Review:Essays on the Principles of Morality and on the Private and Political Rights and Obligations of Mankind. Jonathan Dymond. [REVIEW] Ethics 6 (4):519-.score: 150.0
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  28. David Gill (1996). Political Rights in Aristotle. Ancient Philosophy 16 (2):431-442.score: 150.0
  29. Miller (2006). Legal and Political Rights in Demosthenes and Aristotle. Philosophical Inquiry 28 (1-2):27-60.score: 150.0
  30. Michael A. Weinstein (1971). Basic Political Rights. Southern Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):75-84.score: 150.0
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  31. Kenneth Baynes (2009). Discourse Ethics and the Political Conception of Human Rights. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (1).score: 146.0
    This article examines two recent alternatives to the traditional conception of human rights as natural rights: the account of human rights found in discourse ethics and the ‘political conception’ of human rights influenced by the work of Rawls. I argue that both accounts have distinct merits and that they are not as opposed to one another as is sometimes supposed. At the same time, the discourse ethics account must confront a deep ambiguity in its own (...)
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  32. Kenneth Baynes (2009). Toward a Political Conception of Human Rights. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (4):371-390.score: 144.0
    Human rights have become a wider and more visible feature of our political discourse, yet many have also noted the great discrepancy between the human rights invoked in this discourse and traditional philosophical accounts that conceive of human rights as natural rights. This article explores an alternative approach in which human rights are conceived primarily as international norms aimed at securing the basic conditions of membership or inclusion in a political society. Central to (...)
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  33. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Must We Choose Our Leaders? Human Rights and Political Participation in China. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):177 – 196.score: 144.0
    The essay begins from Alan Gewirth's influential account of human rights, and specifically with his argument that the human right to political participation can only be fulfilled by competitive, liberal democracy. I show that his argument rests on empirical, rather than conceptual grounds, which opens the possibility that in China, alternative forms of participation may be legitimate or even superior. An examination of the theory and contemporary practice of 'democratic centralism' shows that while it does not now adequately (...)
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  34. Martha Minow & Mary Lyndon Shanley (1996). Relational Rights and Responsibilities: Revisioning the Family in Liberal Political Theory and Law. Hypatia 11 (1):4 - 29.score: 144.0
    This article discusses three main orientations in recent works of legal and political theory about the family-contract-based, community-based, and rights-based-and argues that none of these takes adequate account of two paradoxical features of family life and of the family's relationship to the state. A coherent political and legal theory of the family in the contemporary United States requires recognition of the relational rights and responsibilities intrinsic to family life.
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  35. Brian Doherty & Marius de Geus (eds.) (1996). Democracy and Green Political Thought: Sustainability, Rights, and Citizenship. Routledge.score: 144.0
    The green movement has posed some tough questions for traditional justifications of democracy. Should the natural world have rights? Can we take account of the interests of future generation? Do we need to replace existing institutions to deal with the ecological crisis? But questions have also been asked of the greens. Could their idealism undermine democracy? Can greens be effective democrats? Democracy and Green Political Thought, leading writers on green political thought analyze these and other important questions, (...)
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  36. Richard Tuck (1999). The Rights of War and Peace: Political Thought and the International Order From Grotius to Kant. Clarendon Press.score: 144.0
    The Rights of War and Peace is the first fully historical account of the formative period of modern theories of international law. It sets the scene with an extensive history of the theory of international relations from antiquity down to the seventeenth century. Professor Tuck then examines the arguments over the moral basis for war and international aggression, and links the debates to the writings of the great political theorists such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant. -/- This (...)
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  37. Lukas H. Meyer, Stanley L. Paulson & Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge (eds.) (2003). Rights, Culture, and the Law: Themes From the Legal and Political Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    The volume brings together a collection of original papers on some of the main tenets of Joseph Raz's legal and political philosophy: Legal positivism and the nature of law, practical reason, authority, the value of equality, incommensurability, harm, group rights, and multiculturalism.
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  38. Violetta Igneski (2014). A Sufficiently Political Orthodox Conception of Human Rights. 10 (2):167-182.score: 144.0
    The traditional conception of human rights, or the orthodox conception (OC), has, over the last few years, been vigorously challenged by the political conception (PC) of human rights. I have two main aims in this paper: the first is to articulate and evaluate the main points of disagreement between the OC and the PC in order to provide a clearer picture of what is at stake in the debate. The second is to argue that the OC has (...)
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  39. Will Kymlicka & Alan Patten (eds.) (2003). Language Rights and Political Theory. OUP Oxford.score: 144.0
    Disputes over language policy are a persistent feature of the political life of many states around the world. Multilingual countries in the West such as Belgium, Spain, Switzerland and Canada have long histories of conflict over language rights. In many countries in Eastern Europe and the Third World, efforts to construct common institutions and a shared identity have been severely complicated by linguistic diversity. Indigenous languages around the world are in danger of disappearing. Even in the United States, (...)
     
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  40. William Sweet (2001). Idealism and Rights: The Social Ontology of Human Rights in the Political Thought of Bernard Bosanquet. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1).score: 144.0
    This volume presents and discusses the theory of rights of the British idealist political philosopher, Bernard Bosanquet. The political philosophy of the British idealists in general and of Bernard Bosanquet in particular, has been the subject of much misunderstanding and prejudice. Bosanquet's theory of rights proposes to provide a response to the utilitarianism of Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill and the natural rights-based political philosophy of Herbert. The question addressed in this book then, (...)
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  41. Stefano Biondi (2010). Autonomy and End-of-Life Advance Directives in Italy: The Courts' Struggle Against the Political Majority's Attacks on Constitutional Rights. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):67-72.score: 144.0
    This paper explores the significance of a landmark Italian judgement regarding end-of-life advance directives, emphasizing the legal and political context in which the decision was made. The analysis particularly focuses on the political majority's attempt to overturn the outcome of the courts' proceedings – thereby challenging the country's institutional order and jeopardizing constitutional rights.
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  42. Stephen May (2003). Misconceiving Minority Language Rights: Implications for Liberal Political Theory. In Will Kymlicka & Alan Patten (eds.), Language Rights and Political Theory. Oup Oxford. 123--152.score: 144.0
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  43. Virpi Mäkinen (2010). Self-Preservation and Natural Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Political Thought. In , The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 144.0
  44. Alan Patten & Will Kymlicka (2003). Introduction: Language Rights and Political Theory: Context, Issues, and Approaches. In Will Kymlicka & Alan Patten (eds.), Language Rights and Political Theory. Oup Oxford. 1--51.score: 144.0
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  45. George Cristian Maior (2013). Human Rights: Political Tool or Universal Ethics? Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (36):9-21.score: 138.0
    Recent developments in the Arab world reopen one of the most fertile debate topics in international relations theory: the universal nature of the concept “fundamental human rights” and their content. The perspectives are different, being influenced by an ideological background, especially theological, apparently contradictory, affecting the positions of major international actors, stimulating the revival of controversies on major differences between Western world and the developing societies. Through a balanced analysis, specific to critical postmodernism, of the way each civilization (according (...)
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  46. Costas Douzinas (2007). Human Rights and Empire: The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 134.0
    Erudite and timely, this book is a key contribution to the renewal of radical theory and politics.
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  47. Christiane Bailey (2013). Zoopolis. A Political Renewal of Animal Rights Theories. Dialogue:1-13.score: 132.0
    Book Panel on Zoopolis including articles by Clare Palmer, Dinesh Wadiwel and Laura Janara and a reply by Donaldson and Kymlicka.
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  48. David Ingram (2003). Between Political Liberalism and Postnational Cosmopolitanism: Toward an Alternative Theory of Human Rights. Political Theory 31 (3):359-391.score: 132.0
    It is well known that Rawls and Habermas propose different strategies for justifying and classifying human rights. The author argues that neither approach satisfies what he regards as threshold conditions of determinacy, rank ordering, and completeness that any enforceable system of human rights must possess. A related concern is that neither develops an adequate account of group rights, which the author argues fulfills subsidiary conditions for realizing human rights under specific conditions. This latter defect is especially (...)
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  49. Sune Lægaard (2013). Territorial Rights, Political Association, and Immigration. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (5):645-670.score: 132.0
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