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  1.  16
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2015). Cultural Dynamics, Moral Ignorance, and a Plausible Response to Immoral Acts. Cultura 12 (2):7-26.
    I examine the plausibility that culture may induce moral ignorance to mitigate or vitiate blameworthiness. I show how culturally induced moral ignorance may explain and provide an excuse, but not a justification for, terrorist acts, and how a recognition of their moral ignorance and the basis for it, may indicate the proper moral response to extremist Islamic terrorism. I argue that Moody-Adams' criticisms of culturally induced moral ignorance fail to consider how the brainwashing processes, false beliefs, and the closed nature (...)
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  2. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2006). Philosophical Perspectives on Communalism and Morality in African Traditions. Lexington Books.
    This book examines the idea of communalism in African cultures as a dominant philosophical theme that provides the conceptual foundation for African traditional moral thoughts, moral education, values, beliefs, conceptions of reality, practices, ways of life, and the now popular African saying, 'it takes a village to raise a child.' It defends communalism against various criticisms and argues that when properly understood and harnessed, it could provide the necessary foundation for Africa's development.
     
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  3.  3
    Polycarp Ikuenobe, Good and Beautiful: A Moral-Aesthetic View of Personhood in African Communal Traditions.
    I articulate an African view of personhood that combines beauty and goodness–aesthetic and moral features. I discuss the idea of communalism, which provides the social and moral values and belief system that give meaning to this view of personhood. I use ideas from some African ethnic traditions, or some people’s account of these traditions, as examples to illustrate this view. The similarities in these examples from different ethnic traditions indicate that it is reasonable to characterize this view as a common (...)
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  4.  7
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2015). Relational Autonomy, Personhood, and African Traditions. Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1005-1029.
    The commonplace view of autonomy involves the ability of individuals to be self-governing and self-legislating, and to make freely and reflectively deliberate choices and decisions. This idea of autonomy — that persons are metaphysically free, that is, that they have free will and may use reason to choose how they shall act — is considered to be a defining feature of a responsible person. There is a commonplace view that autonomy is intrinsically good such that overriding it cannot be justified.1 (...)
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  5.  73
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2011). Conceptualizing Racism and Its Subtle Forms. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):161-181.
    Many people are talking about being in a post-racial era, which implies that we have overcome race and racism. Their argument is based on the fact that manyof the virulent manifestations of racism are not prevalent today. I argue that racism is not seen as prevalent today because the commonplace views of racism fail to capture the more subtle and insidious new forms of racism. I critically examine some of these views and indicate that racism, its forms and manifestations have (...)
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  6.  45
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2006). The Idea of Personhood in Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart. Philosophia Africana 9 (2):117-131.
  7.  6
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2004). On the Theoretical Unification and Nature of Fallacies. Argumentation 18 (2):189-211.
    I argue in a non-reductive sense for a plausible epistemic principle, which can (1) theoretically and instrumentally unify or systematize all fallacies, and (2) provide a justification for using such a principle for characterizing an erroneous argument as a fallacy. This plausible epistemic principle involves the idea of an error in the method of justification, which results in a failure to provide relevant evidence to satisfy certain standards of adequate proof. Thus, all fallacies are systematically disguised failures to provide substantive (...)
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  8.  26
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). Moral Education and Moral Reasoning in Traditional African Cultures. Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (1):25-42.
  9.  27
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). A Defense of Epistemic Authoritarianism in Traditional African Cultures. Journal of Philosophical Research 23:417-440.
    In this paper, I take issue with Wiredu’s characterization and criticism of the general problem of epistemic authoritarianism that he identifies in some African cultures. I then defend a plausible view of epistemic authoritarianism as a method of epistemic justification in some African cultures. I argue that both his characterization and criticism implies an affirmation of epistemic individualism and autonomy, doxastic voluntarism, and a denial of epistemic dependence. I argue against epistemic autonomy and individualism, and doxastic voluntarism, because they imply (...)
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  10.  27
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1997). The Parochial Universalist Conception of 'Philosophy' and 'African Philosophy'. Philosophy East and West 47 (2):189-210.
    The universalists argue that there is currently no African philosophy. Compared to Western philosophy, African philosophy does not have the requisite features of a writing tradition and a rigorous and critical analytical approach to debates over universal conceptual issues, engaged in by individuals. This stance, it is argued here, involves a parochial conception of 'philosophy' that is applied to African philosophy and captures only the contemporary analytic tradition of Western philosophy--while the ancient and medieval periods indicate that other speculative, constructive, (...)
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  11.  3
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2004). Culture of Racism, Self-Respect, and Blameworthiness. Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (1):27-55.
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  12.  20
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1995). Cognitive Relativism, African Philosophy, and the Phenomenon of Witchcraft. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (3):143-160.
  13.  14
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2013). Conceptualizing and Theorizing About the Idea of a “Post‐Racial” Era. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (4):446-468.
    I critically examine the eliminativist theories of race or racism, and the behavioral theory of racism, which provide the theoretical foundation, respectively, for the nominalist and substantive conceptualizations of the idea of a post-racial era. The eliminativist theories seek to eliminate the concepts of “race” or “racism” from our discourse. Such elimination indicates a nominalist sense of the idea of a post-racial era. The behavioral theory of racism argues that racism must be manifested in obviously harmful actions. And because such (...)
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  14.  19
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). Communitarianism, Liberalism, and an Epistemic View of Critical Thinking. Inquiry 18 (1):73-94.
  15. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2000). Internationalism and the Rationality of African Metaphysical Beliefs. African Philosophy 13 (2):125-142.
  16.  21
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2001). African Tradition, Philosophy, and Modernization. Philosophical Papers 30 (3):245-259.
    Abstract I examine Wiredu's views that (1) ethnophilosophy cannot be considered a legitimate philosophy because it has the feature of authoritarianism, and that (2) this feature of African tradition will not allow modern philosophy to flourish because it prevents individuals from rationally and critically examining beliefs. The ability to rationally acquire and examine beliefs, he insists, is critical for modernization in Africa. I argue that authoritarianism per se in Africa is not necessarily bad because its rational variant, which is justifiable, (...)
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  17. Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). In Search of Human Universality: Context and Justification in Cultural Philosophy. Humanitas 11 (1):58-90.
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  18.  20
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2002). The Meta-Ethical Issue of the Nature of Lying: Implications for Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (1):37-63.
    I argue that lying has many dimensions, hence, some putativecases of lying may not match our intuitions or acceptedmeanings of lying. The moral lesson we should teach must be that lying is not a simple principle or feature, buta cluster of features or spectrum of shades, where anythingin the spectrum or cluster is considered lying. I argue thatthe view regarding lying as a single principle or featurehas problematic meta-ethical implications. I do a meta-ethicalanalysis of the meaning of lying, (...)
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  19.  14
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2002). Moral Epistemology, Relativism, African Cultures, and the Distinction Between Custom and Morality. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:641-669.
    This paper explores the nature of the relationship between reasonable variations in moral justifications and universal moral principles. It examines Wiredu’s distinction between custom and morality, and its implications for the issue of moral justification in African cultures. It argues that Wiredu’s distinction does not adequately articulate how universal moral principles are employed in different circumstances to justify actions and judgments. Wiredu’s distinction implies that a conceptual account of moral justification does not involve custom regarding relative facts and cultural norms. (...)
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  20.  16
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). Colonialism in Africa, Culturally Induced Moral Ignorance, and the Scope of Responsibility. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 28 (2):109–128.
    This paper analyzes colonialism in Africa to show a plausible connection between culture and human agency and to highlight the conceptual problem of ascribing responsibility in the context of the notion of culturally induced moral ignorance. It argues for the plausibility of the inability thesis, which states that people can be rendered morally ignorant by their culture, using as a backdrop, Moody-Adams’ account of the connection between culture and agency. It shows that Moody-Adams’ account, and her criteria for (...)
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  21.  12
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2001). Questioning as an Epistemic Process of Critical Thinking. Educational Philosophy and Theory 33 (3-4):325-341.
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  22.  8
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (1996). An Examination of the Universalist Trend Regarding the Nature of African Philosophy. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (2):187-203.
  23.  11
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2001). Rationality, Practical Reasonableness, and the Social and Moral Foundation of a Legal System. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (3):245–267.
  24.  7
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2004). Logical Positivism, Analytic Method, and Criticisms of Ethnophilosophy. Metaphilosophy 35 (4):479-503.
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  25.  4
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2001). Cognitive Relativism Without Incommensurability, Truth, and Particularism. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (2):31-57.
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  26.  6
    Polycarp Ikuenobe (2003). Optimizing Reasonableness, Critical Thinking, and Cyberspace. Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (4):407–424.
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  27. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2002). A Natural Law Critique Of Liberal Approaches To A Multicultural Consequence Of Globalism. Vera Lex 3 (1/2):1-38.
     
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  28. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2010). Citizenship and Patriotism. Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (4):297-318.
    The commonplace view of patriotism involves loving one’s own particular country of citizenship or one’s homeland exclusively. Such love is expressed or manifested by the virtue or value of unconditional loyalty, care, sacrifice, devotion, and partiality toward a country that one is a legal citizen of.1 This suggests that being a legal citizen or a country being one’s own legally is necessary but not sufficient to justify, explain, or motivate acts of patriotism. It is necessary because one cannot be considered (...)
     
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  29. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2004). Descriptive Procedural Aspects of Aquinas’ Natural Law Theory. Vera Lex 5 (1/2):65-90.
     
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  30. Polycarp Ikuenobe (1999). Moral Thought in African Cultures?: A Metaphilosophical Question. African Philosophy 12 (2):105-123.
  31. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2001). Natural Law, Liberal Principles, and the Moral Acceptance of Rules. Vera Lex 2.
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