Search results for 'Popular culture' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  37
    Holt N. Parker (2011). Toward a Definition of Popular Culture. History and Theory 50 (2):147-170.
    The most common definitions of popular culture suffer from a presentist bias and cannot be applied to pre-industrial and pre-capitalist societies. A survey reveals serious conceptual difficulties as well. We may, however, gain insight in two ways. 1) By moving from a Marxist model to a more Weberian approach . 2) By looking to Bourdieu’s “cultural capital” and Danto’s and Dickie’s “Institutional Theory of Art,” and defining popular culture as “unauthorized culture.”.
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  2.  48
    John Storey (2008). Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction. Pearson Longman.
    In this 4th edition of his successful Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction, John Storey has extensively revised the text throughout.
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  3.  37
    Robert W. Witkin (2003). Adorno on Popular Culture. Routledge.
    In the decades since his death, Adorno's thinking has lost none of its capacity to unsettle the settled, and has proved hugely influential in social and cultural thought. To most people, the entertainment provided by television, radio, film, newspapers, astrology charts and CD players seem harmless enough. For Adorno, however, the culture industry that produces them is ultimately toxic in its effect on the social process. Here, Robert Witkin unpacks Adorno's notoriously difficult critique of popular (...) in an engaging and accessible style, looking first at the development of the overarching theories of authority, commodification and negative dialectics within which Adorno's work needs to be seen. This book is an essential guide for understanding one of the key thinkers of our time. (shrink)
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  4.  8
    Mihaela Frunza (2010). Christopher Partridge, The Re-Enchantment of the West. Volume II. Alternative Spiritualities, Sacralization, Popular Culture, and Occulture. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (16):179-181.
    Christopher Partridge, The Re-Enchantment of the West. Volume II. Alternative Spiritualities, Sacralization, Popular Culture, and Occulture T&T Clark, New York, 2005.
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  5.  27
    Mary Faith Marshall (2004). The Placebo Effect in Popular Culture. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):37-42.
    This paper gives an overview of the placebo effect in popular culture, especially as it pertains to the work of authors Patrick O’Brian and Sinclair Lewis. The beloved physician as placebo, and the clinician scientist as villain are themes that respectively inform the novels, The Hundred Days and Arrowsmith. Excerpts from the novels, and from film show how the placebo effect, and the randomized clinical trial, have emerged into popular culture, and evolved (...)
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  6.  6
    Andrada Fatu-Tutoveanu & Corneliu Pintilescu (2012). Religious “Avatars” and Implicit Religion: Recycling Myths and Religious Patterns Within Contemporary US Popular Culture. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (33):182-205.
    Contemporary cultural and media studies have been increasingly interested in redefining the relations between religion and culture (and particularly popular culture). The present study approaches a series of theories on the manner in which religious aspects emerge and are integrated in contemporary cultural manifestations, focusing on the persistence/resurrection of religious patterns into secularized cultural contents. Thus, the analysis departs from the concept of implicit religion, coined and developed by Bailey and the theories following it, as well as (...)
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  7.  3
    Lee Barron (2012). Social Theory in Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Social theory can sometimes seem as though it's speaking of a world that existed long ago, so why should we continue to study and discuss the theories of these dead white men? Can their work still inform us about the way we live today? Are they still relevant to our consumer-focused, celebrity-crazy, tattoo-friendly world? This book explains how the ideas of classical sociological theory can be understood, and applied to, everyday activities like listening to hip-hop, reading fashion magazines or watching (...)
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  8.  3
    Sharon Crasnow & Joanne Waugh (eds.) (2012). Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    The eight essays contained in Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture explore the portrayal of women and various philosophical responses to that portrayal in contemporary post-civil rights society. The essays examine visual, print, and performance media — stand-up comedy, movies, television, and a blockbuster trilogy of novel. These philosophical feminist analyses of popular culture consider the possibilities, both positive and negative, that popular culture presents for articulating the structure of (...)
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  9.  25
    Debra Jackson (2015). Philosophical Feminism and Popular Culture, by Sharon Crasnow and Joanne Waugh (Eds). [REVIEW] Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 15 (1):16-17.
  10. Stéphanie Genz (2009). Postfemininities in Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Addressing the contradictions surrounding modern-day femininity and its complicated relationship with feminism and postfeminism, this book examines a range of popular female/feminist icons and paradigms. It offers an innovative and forward-looking perspective on femininity and the modern female self.
     
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  11.  1
    Catherine M. Roach (2003). Mother / Nature: Popular Culture and Environmental Ethics. Indiana University Press.
    This brief but ambitious book explores our relationship with nature through the imagery we use when we talk about Mother Nature. Employing the critical tools of religious studies, psychology, and gender studies, Catherine M. Roach examines the various manifestations of nature as "mother" and what that idea implies for the way we approach the natural world. Part One, "Nature as Good Mother," discusses the notion that nature is, or is like, a beneficent and nurturing mother who provides and maintains life. (...)
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  12.  3
    Margaret S. Hrezo & John M. Parrish (eds.) (2010). Damned If You Do: Dilemmas of Action in Literature and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    These essays showcase the value of the narrative arts in investigating complex conflicts of value in moral and political life, and explore the philosophical problem of moral dilemmas as expressed in ancient drama, classic and contemporary ...
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  13. M. A. Min, Jiang Jin, Wang di, Joseph W. Esherick & L. U. Hanchao (2008). The Symposium on Urban Popular Culture in Modern China. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):499-532.
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  14. Barry Richards (1994). Disciplines of Delight: The Psychoanalysis of Popular Culture. Free Association Books.
  15.  68
    John Storey (ed.) (2009). Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A Reader. Ft Prentice Hall.
    New to this edition: 4 new readings Stuart Hall The rediscovery of 'ideology': return of the repressed in media studies Ernesto Laclau and Chantal Mouffe Post ...
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  16.  4
    D. Beer & R. Burrows (2013). Popular Culture, Digital Archives and the New Social Life of Data. Theory, Culture and Society 30 (4):47-71.
    Digital data inundation has far-reaching implications for: disciplinary jurisdiction; the relationship between the academy, commerce and the state; and the very nature of the sociological imagination. Hitherto much of the discussion about these matters has tended to focus on ‘transactional’ data held within large and complex commercial and government databases. This emphasis has been quite understandable – such transactional data does indeed form a crucial part of the informational infrastructures that are now emerging. However, in recent years new sources of (...)
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  17. John Lechte (1993). Reviews : Slavoj Žižek, The Sublime Object of Ideology (Verso, 1989); Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan Through Popular Culture (MIT Press, 1991). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 34 (1):191-196.
    Reviews : Slavoj Žižek, The Sublime Object of Ideology ; Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan Through Popular Culture.
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  18. Rhoderick Nuncio (2009). Foucault, Popular Culture, and Television. Philosophia 38 (1).
    This paper questions the meaning of popular culture under the auspices of modernity. The late transition and extension of modernity is technology. This eventual process is characterized by material culture. However, it is difficult to ignore the moment of postmodernity when the effects of the transition and the products themselves have given impetus to new constellations of discursive formation. The visual culture tends to dominate the scheme of things in popular (...)
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  19.  16
    Trevor Hogan & Peter Beilharz (2012). Writing Oz Pop: An Insider's Account of Australian Popular Culture Making and Historiography An Interview with Clinton J Walker. Thesis Eleven 109 (1):89-114.
    This interview – conducted by Peter Beilharz and Trevor Hogan with Clinton Walker over the course of three months (July to September 2011) between Melbourne and Sydney via email and Skype – explores the questions of Australian popular culture writing with, against, and of the culture industries themselves. Walker is a leading freelance Australian cultural historian and rock music journalist. He is the author of seven books, five about Australian music. He has been a radio DJ and (...)
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  20.  5
    Stefán Snævarr (2009). Popular Culture. A Reply to Shusterman and Małecki. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 20 (38).
    The article is a response to criticism of my two recent articles on Richard Shusterman’s view of popular culture by Shusterman and Małecki. The former maintains that I have misrepresented his view on Europe, the USA and popular culture. But I point out that he talks as if there is no popular culture in Europe due to Europe’s aristocratic traditions, and that the USA is a hotbed of popular culture thanks to its (...)
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  21.  15
    Daniel P. Malloy (2012). Four Recent Works in Philosophy and Popular Culture. Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):293-304.
    Popular culture is ubiquitous. And referencing popular culture can be an excellent pedagogical tool. Used properly, it provides students with easily accessible examples—in some cases examples they have already been interested in. Given these facts, the creation and expansion of the literature on the intersection of popular culture and philosophy is not surprising. The purpose of these volumes has been controversial since their inception, but they do seem ideally suited as introductory texts. This essay (...)
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  22.  9
    Wojciech Małecki (2009). Pragmatist Aesthetics, the New Literacy, and Popular Culture. A Response to Stefán Snævarr. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 20 (38).
    The article is a critical response to Stefán Snævarr’s “Pragmatism and Popular Culture: Shusterman, Popular Art, and the Challenge of Visuality.”In its first part, I attempt to prove that several of Snævarr’s claims about popular culture and new media, which form the basic premises of his diagnosis of the alleged intellectual decline of the West, are either dubious or wrong. Moreover, in the context of this diagnosis, Snævarr levels some serious accusations against Richard Shusterman’s theory (...)
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  23.  3
    Tetsuo Kogawa (1985). New Trends in Japanese Popular Culture. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (64):147-152.
    Popular culture’ has two Japanese translations: taishu bunka and minshu bunka. Bunka embraces the entire concept of ‘culture,’ but ‘popular’ isn't so easily translated. Taishu means a large number (tai) of population or groups (shu), while minshu means groups (shu) of ordinary people (min). Thus, minshu bunka is a more faithful translation of 'popular culture’ than taishu bunka. Yet, the expression minshu bunka does not occur as frequently as taishu bunka. This means that, in (...)
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  24.  9
    John Huss (2014). Popular Culture and Philosophy: Rules of Engagement. Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):19-32.
    The exploration of popular culture topics by academic philosophers for non-academic audiences has given rise to a distinctive genre of philosophical writing. Edited volumes with titles such as Black Sabbath and Philosophy or Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy contain chapters by multiple philosophical authors that attempt to bring philosophy to popular audiences. Two dominant models have emerged in the genre. On the pedagogical model, authors use popular culture examples to teach the reader philosophy. The (...)
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  25. John Storey (2009). Introduction: The Study of Popular Culture and Cultural Studies. In Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: A Reader. Ft Prentice Hall
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  26.  1
    Robert Haskell (1993). Realpolitik in the Addictions Field: Treatment-Professional, Popular-Culture Ideology, and Scientific Research. Journal of Mind and Behavior 14 (3):257-276.
    The article examines recurrent instances of personal and professional negative sanctions resulting from individual researchers publishing findings considered contrary to the historical and prevailing alcoholism and drug-addiction treatment Zeitgeist. Instances from the published literature along with personal accounts from professionals in the field are presented. It is suggested that these instances indicate a pattern of political and ideological conflicts generated from a treatment-professional and a popular-culture, nonscientifically based belief system on the one hand, versus a research-based system on (...)
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  27.  1
    Diane Shoos (1992). The Female Subject of Popular Culture. Hypatia 7 (2):215-226.
    This essay discusses the place of popular culture, especially visual representation, in theories of female subjectivity and examines two recent works on women and popular culture as representative of two primary critical and methodological approaches to the female subject. The essay considers the limitations and implications of both qualitative communication research and text-based feminist criticism and the need to construct a dialogue between them.
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  28.  1
    James F. McGrath, The Desert of the Real: Christianity, Buddhism & Baudrillard in The Matrix Films and Popular Culture.
    The movie The Matrix and its sequels draw explicitly on imagery from a number of sources, including in particular Buddhism, Christianity, and the writings of Jean Baudrillard. A perspective is offered on the perennial philosophical question ‘What is real?’, using language and symbols drawn from three seemingly incompatible world views. In doing so, these movies provide us with an insight into the way popular culture makes eclectic use of various streams of thought to fashion a new reality that (...)
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  29. Ishay Landa (2007). The Overman in the Marketplace: Nietzschean Heroism in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This book explores the emergence and significance of 'a Nietzschean heroic model' in 20th-century popular culture, some notable examples of which are James Bond, Tarzan, and Hannibal Lecter.
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  30. Ishay Landa (2009). The Overman in the Marketplace: Nietzschean Heroism in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This book explores the emergence and significance of 'a Nietzschean heroic model' in 20th-century popular culture, some notable examples of which are James Bond, Tarzan, and Hannibal Lecter.
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  31. Rebecca Munford, Melanie Waters & Imelda Whelehan (2014). Feminism and Popular Culture: Investigating the Postfeminist Mystique. Rutgers University Press.
    When the term “postfeminism” entered the media lexicon in the 1990s, it was often accompanied by breathless headlines about the “death of feminism.” Those reports of feminism’s death may have been greatly exaggerated, and yet contemporary popular culture often conjures up a world in which feminism had never even been born, a fictional universe filled with suburban Stepford wives, maniacal career women, alluring amnesiacs, and other specimens of retro femininity. In _Feminism and Popular Culture_, Rebecca Munford and (...)
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  32. Alexander Riley (2010). Impure Play: Sacredness, Transgression, and the Tragic in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This is a cultural sociology of some controversial aspects of contemporary popular culture. The book rereads disparaged and vilified cultural objects ranging from gangsta rap and death metal to violent video games, using cultural theories on transgression, the sacred, and the tragic as the interpretive lens.
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  33. Alexander Riley (2012). Impure Play: Sacredness, Transgression, and the Tragic in Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    This is a cultural sociology of some controversial aspects of contemporary popular culture. The book rereads disparaged and vilified cultural objects ranging from gangsta rap and death metal to violent video games, using cultural theories on transgression, the sacred, and the tragic as the interpretive lens.
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  34. Sumita S. Chakravarty (2011). Reflections on the Body Beautiful in Indian Popular Culture. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (2):395-416.
    In what ways does a society perceive itself as beautiful? Do images of physical perfection indicate aspirations of the social or national body, the perfect body/face emblematic of the collective self-image? In recent years, under conditions of economic and cultural globalization, practices and discourses to render the body beautiful have come under increasing scrutiny. Concerned with the marketing and commodification of body ideals, these studies trace the deleterious effects of advertising, fashion, and celebrity culture in various national and (...)
     
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  35. Charles W. Colson (2005). Lies That Go Unchallenged in Popular Culture. Tyndale House Publishers.
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  36. Thomas S. Hibbs (1999). Shows About Nothing: Nihilism in Popular Culture From the Exorcist to Seinfeld. Spence Pub..
     
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  37. Thomas S. Hibbs (2011). Shows About Nothing: Nihilism in Popular Culture. Baylor University Press.
    Nihilism, American style -- The quest for evil -- The negative zone : suburban familial malaise in American beauty, Revolutionary road, and Mad men -- Normal nihilism as comic : Seinfeld, Trainspotting, and Pulp fiction -- Romanticism and nihilism -- Defense against the dark arts : from Se7en to the Dark knight and Harry Potter -- God got involved : sacred quests and overcoming nihilism -- Feels like the movies.
     
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  38. Jensen Sass (2013). Book Review: Impure Play: Sacredness, Transgression, and the Tragic in Popular Culture. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 116 (1):114-117.
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  39.  1
    Linnell Secomb (2007). Philosophy and Love: From Plato to Popular Culture. Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy and Love introduces readers to philosophical reflections on love from Plato to the present. Bringing philosophy together with popular cultural analysis, Linnell Secomb provides an interesting and engaging account of theories of love throughout history. Along the way, reflections on same-sex desire, cross-cultural love, and internet romance are considered against the ideas of Nietzsche, Beauvoir, Irigaray, Derrida, and Fanon, and other contemporary cultural commentators on the human condition. The work also looks at cultural productions of love ranging from (...)
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  40.  8
    William Irwin (2014). Writing for the Reader: A Defense of Philosophy and Popular Culture Books. Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):77-85.
    There are some risks in producing public philosophy. We don’t want to misrepresent the work of philosophy or mislead readers into thinking they have learned all they need to know from a single, short book or article. The potential benefits, though, outweigh the risks. Public philosophy can disseminate important ideas and enhance appreciation for the difficult and complex work of philosophers. Popular writing is often less precise, lacking in fine detail and elaboration, but it can still be accurate . (...)
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  41.  16
    Nakia S. Pope (2011). Hit by the Street: Dewey and Popular Culture. Education and Culture 27 (1):26-39.
    The idea for this paper started with an image that is likely wholly imaginary but interesting nonetheless. It's the late 1920s in New York City. John Dewey, after a busy day of teaching and working through the notes that will eventually become Individualism Old and New, leaves his office at Columbia University. Instead of turning south toward home, he turns north and east, into Harlem. He strolls for a bit, turns up 7th Ave., and stops in front of the Regent (...)
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  42.  2
    George Gerbner (1998). Iv the Politics of Popular Culture 13 Stories of Violence and the Public Interest. In Kees Brants, Joke Hermes & Liesbet van Zoonen (eds.), The Media in Question: Popular Cultures and Public Interests. Sage Publications 135.
  43.  3
    Giacomo Borbone (2012). From Cosmopolitism to National-Popular Culture Gramscian Attempt at Overcoming Provincialism. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):87-102.
    Circulation of ideas among philosophers is the core of Philosophy itself. The lack of this circulation can lead to obscurantism and cultural provincialism. The latter, for instance, afflicted Italy during the first half of the 20th century because of the close-minded neo-idealism of Croce and the mutual indifference of science and philosophy. Antonio Gramsci tried to overcome the problem of provincialism. In this essay, I explain how he attempted to overcome it. I focus on his conceptual categories like heg emony, (...)
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  44. Paul Cantor, Joel Johnson, Susan McWilliams, Travis D. Smith, Charles Turner & A. Craig Waggaman (2010). Damned If You Do: Dilemmas of Action in Literature and Popular Culture. Lexington Books.
    These essays showcase the value of the narrative arts in investigating complex conflicts of value in moral and political life, and explore the philosophical problem of moral dilemmas as expressed in ancient drama, classic and contemporary novels, television, film, and popular fiction. From Aeschylus to Deadwood, from Harriet Beecher Stowe to Harry Potter, the authors show how the narrative arts provide some of our most valuable instruments for complex and sensitive moral inquiry.
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  45. Claire Charles (2013). Elite Girls' Schooling, Social Class and Sexualised Popular Culture. Routledge.
    Young women’s identities are an issue of public and academic interest across a number of western nations at the present time. This book explores how young women attending an elite school for girls understand and construct ‘empowerment’. It investigates the extent to which, and the ways in which, their constructions of empowerment and identity work to overturn, or resist, key regulations and normative expectations for girls in post-feminist, hyper-sexualised cultural contexts. The book provides a succinct overview of feminist theorisations of (...)
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  46. Joke Hermes (1998). Popular Culture and Cultural Citizenship. In Kees Brants, Joke Hermes & Liesbet van Zoonen (eds.), The Media in Question: Popular Cultures and Public Interests. Sage Publications 157--67.
     
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  47. Catherine M. Roach (2003). Mother / Nature: Popular Culture and Environmental Ethics. Indiana University Press.
    This brief but ambitious book explores our relationship with nature through the imagery we use when we talk about Mother Nature. Employing the critical tools of religious studies, psychology, and gender studies, Catherine M. Roach examines the various manifestations of nature as "mother" and what that idea implies for the way we approach the natural world. Part One, "Nature as Good Mother," discusses the notion that nature is, or is like, a beneficent and nurturing mother who provides and maintains life. (...)
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  48.  95
    Gary Charles (forthcoming). Book Review: Secular Steeples: Popular Culture and the Religious Imagination. [REVIEW] Interpretation 59 (3):330-330.
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  49.  95
    Charles Zika (1991). Reviews : Michael Mullett, Popular Culture and Popular Protest in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe (London, Croom Helm, 1987). Thesis Eleven 29 (1):126-129.
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  50. Roger Cooter & Stephen Pumfrey (1994). Separate Spheres and Public Places: Reflections on the History of Science Popularization and Science in Popular Culture. History of Science 32 (97):237-267.
     
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