Search results for 'Positive freedom' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  13
    Danny Frederick (forthcoming). Freedom: Positive, Negative, Expressive. Reason Papers 38 (2).
    I apply Karl Popper’s conception of critical rationality to the question of personal fulfilment. I show that such fulfilment normally depends upon the person achieving positive freedom, and that positive freedom requires negative freedom, including freedom of expression. If the state has legitimacy, its central duty must be the enforcement of those rules that provide the best prospects for personal fulfilment for the people under its jurisdiction. The state is therefore morally debarred from suppressing (...)
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  2. David West (1993). Spinoza on Positive Freedom. Political Studies 41 (2):284-96.
     
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  3. Autonomy-Based Freedom (2007). Joseph Raz, From The Morality of Freedom (1986). In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub. 413.
     
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  4. Ability Freedom (2007). Part VII Freedom, Ability, and Economic Inequality. In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub. 350.
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  5.  17
    Maria Dimova-Cookson (2012). Liberty as Welfare The Basecamp Counterpart of Positive Freedom. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 18 (2):133-165.
    L.T.Hobhouse's concept of liberty--the concept at the heart of new liberalism--is based on T.H. Green's positive freedom. However, this paper demonstrates that the former has its own distinct nature and can be usefully defined as 'liberty as welfare'. In a context of renewed interest in the link between liberty and ability/personal development, scholars have looked back to Green's positive liberty. But the complex nature of latter has led to scholarly disagreement about its definitive features. The paper argues (...)
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  6.  7
    A. Simhony (2016). Berlin and Bosanquet: True Self and Positive Freedom. European Journal of Political Theory 15 (1):3-21.
    Is the Idealist conception of positive freedom doomed as politically dangerous? Decidedly yes, Berlin famously argues. The danger lies with manipulating positive freedom into a political tool of tyranny, coercing individuals to be free. The vehicle of manipulation is a conception of a divided self that underpins positive freedom. For, Berlin argues, conceptions of freedom derive directly from views of what constitutes a self. He cites the British Idealists as evidence for his criticism. (...)
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  7. Maria Dimova-Cookson (2003). A New Scheme of Positive and Negative Freedom: Reconstructing T. H. Green on Freedom. Political Theory 31 (4):508-532.
    This article offers a new scheme of the relation between positive and negative freedom that is based on a retrieval of T. H. Green's theory of freedom and on further reconstructions of his theory. Some of the distinctions in the literature have proven difficult to sustain, and this has resulted in a weakening of the dichotomy in principle, and of the concepts of positive and negative freedom independently of each other. The main distinction between negative (...)
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  8. Gerald C. MacCallum Jr (1967). Negative and Positive Freedom. Philosophical Review 76 (3):312-334.
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  9.  48
    A. Simhony (1993). Beyond Negative and Positive Freedom: T. H. Green's View of Freedom. Political Theory 21 (1):28-54.
  10. John Christman (1991). Liberalism and Individual Positive Freedom. Ethics 101 (2):343-359.
  11.  58
    James W. Allard (2010). T.H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom: From Metaphysics to Political Theory (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):538-539.
    Although T. H. Green is primarily remembered today as a moral and political philosopher, many of his philosophical concerns owe their origins to the Victorian crisis of faith in which a widespread belief in the literal truth of Scripture confronted seemingly incompatible scientific theories. Green attributed this crisis to the inability of science and religion to find accommodation in the popular version of empiricism widely accepted by educated men and women of his day. In his 371-page introduction to Hume’s Treatise, (...)
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  12.  2
    Timothy Houk, Russell DiSilvestro & Mark Jensen (2016). Smoke and Mirrors: Subverting Rationality, Positive Freedom, and Their Relevance to Nudging and/or Smoking Policies. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (7):20-22.
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  13.  45
    Morton White (1973). Positive Freedom, Negative Freedom, and Possibility. Journal of Philosophy 70 (11):309-317.
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  14. J. Christman (2005). Saving Positive Freedom. Political Theory 33 (1):79-88.
  15.  4
    Nobel Ang (2014). Positive Freedom as Exercise of Rational Ability: A Kantian Defense of Positive Liberty. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (1):1-16.
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  16.  10
    Paul Brazier (2007). T. H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom (British Idealist Studies, Series 3: Green). By Ben Wempet. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics and Political Philosophy. Edited by Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1007–1010.
  17. Axel Honneth (1999). The Tensions Between Negative and Positive Freedom in Isaiah Berlin's Political Philosophy. Social Research 66 (4).
     
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  18. Yıldız Silier (2017). Freedom: Negative and Positive Conceptions. Routledge.
    Isaiah Berlin made a now classic distinction between negative and positive conceptions of freedom. This book, first published in 2005, introduces a fresh way of looking at these conceptions and presents a new defence of the positive conception of freedom. Revealing how the internal debate between various versions of negative freedom give rise to hybrid conceptions of freedom which in turn are superseded by various versions of the positive conception of freedom, Silier (...)
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  19.  16
    Boris DeWiel (2010). Freedom as Creativity: On the Origin of the Positive Concept of Liberty. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):42-57.
    The concept of positive liberty includes both the regulative autonomy to do what we will and the constitutive autonomy to become what we will. However, the latter represents the full meaning of the idea. Liberty in this meaning is a creative power: we are most free in the positive sense when we give our defining constitutive rules to ourselves. The original conceptual model for liberty as creativity did not belong to classical Greek tradition but came to us from (...)
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  20. Adrian Blau (2004). Against Positive and Negative Freedom. Political Theory 32 (4):547-553.
  21.  1
    Kenneth Minogue (1995). The Positive Side of Freedom. In E. Barker (ed.), Lse on Freedom. Lse Books 29.
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  22.  4
    John Christman (2015). Freedom in Times of Struggle: Positive Liberty, Again. Analyse & Kritik 37 (1-2).
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  23.  77
    Peter Woolcock (1995). Hunt and Berlin on Positive and Negative Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):458 – 464.
  24.  45
    Ian Hunt (1995). A Note on Woolcock's Defence of Berlin on Positive and Negative Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):465 – 471.
  25.  31
    Gyorgy Markus (1999). On Freedom: Positive and Negative. Constellations 6 (3):273-289.
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  26.  3
    S. D. Kaplan (2000). Beyond Positive and Negative Liberty: Samuel Fleischacker's Personal Freedom of Judgment. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (2):165-184.
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  27.  18
    Louis Groarke (2007). Freedom: Political, Metaphysical, Negative and Positive. By Yildiz Silier. Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1018–1019.
  28.  10
    Christopher J. Insole (2004). The Worship of Freedom: Negative and Positive Notions of Liberty in Philosophy of Religion and Political Philosophy. Heythrop Journal 45 (2):209–226.
  29.  3
    Alan Rubel (2014). Privacy and Positive Intellectual Freedom. Journal of Social Philosophy 45 (3):390-407.
  30.  5
    James A. Gould (1982). Positive and Negative Economic Freedom. Critica 14 (41):55 - 64.
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  31. G. J. Fritzberg (2002). Freedom That Counts: The Historic Underpinnings of Positive Libarty and Equality of Educational Opportunity. Journal of Thought 37 (2):7-20.
     
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  32.  12
    Saulius Arlauskas & Daiva Petrėnaitė (2013). The Principle of Freedom in the Law of Democratic Country. Jurisprudence 20 (2):407-428.
    Although the need of freedom is definite, the concept of individual freedom, while being interpreted with legal terms, causes not only theoretical, but also practical problems. The observed two extremes of freedom are defined as any human self-expression as well as the license, where the state power is generally attributed to disregard personal freedom. In this article the freedom of expression and state enforcement jurisdiction dichotomy are addressed by discussing positive and negative conceptions of (...)
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  33.  93
    Marek Piechowiak (2007). Negative Freedom or Objective Good: A Recurring Dilemma in the Foundations of Politics. In Taborska Halina & Wojciechowski Jan S. (eds.), Dokąd zmierza Europa – przywództwo – idee – wartości. Where Europe Is Going – Leadership – Ideas – Values. 537-544.
    Two competing models of metaaxiological justification of politics are analyzed. Politics is understood broadly, as actions which aim at organizing social life. I will be, first of all, interested in law making activities. When I talk about metaaxiological justification I think not so much about determinations of what is good, but about determinations refering to the way the good is founded, in short: determinations which answer the question why something is good. In the first model, which is described here as (...)
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  34.  1
    Marianne Boenink & Simone van der Burg (2010). Informed Decision Making About Predictive DNA Tests: Arguments for More Public Visibility of Personal Deliberations About the Good Life. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):127-138.
    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of people’s life. The decision whether or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes (...)
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  35.  43
    Martin van Hees (2003). Acting Autonomously Versus Not Acting Heteronomously. Theory and Decision 54 (4):337-355.
    This paper presents a formal framework that purports to capture some aspects of Kant's theory of freedom. In particular, we argue that the analysis sheds further light on Kant's distinction between a negative and a positive concept of freedom. The paper shows that the two concepts are not equivalent: we not only argue that in a Kantian perspective negative freedom need not entail positive freedom, but also that there are situations in which a person (...)
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  36. Wolfgang Gil (2012). Platón contra la democracia. O las desventuras de la sinergia. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (37):109-124.
    El propósito de este ensayo es explorar la doctrina política de Platón sobre la democracia a partir del concepto sinergia, es decir, de poder sinérgico, colaboración creativa que reduce los grados de dominación en el régimen político, tal como lo entiende James Craig. Aunque el concepto de poder sinérgico no fue conocido por Platón y ha sido descuidado tanto por la politología como por la filosofía política, considero que es el criterio indispensable para dejar en claro muchas de las ambigüedades (...)
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  37. Jan Narveson (1998). Libertarianism Vs. Marxism: Reflections on G. A. Cohen's Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 2 (1):1-26.
    Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality is G.A. Cohens attempt to rescue something of the socialist outlook on society from the challenge of libertarianism, which Cohen identifies with the work of Robert Nozick in his famous book, Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Sympathizing with the leading idea that a person must belong to himself, and thus be unavailable for forced redistribution of his efforts, Cohen is at pains to reconcile the two. This cannot be done – they are flatly contrary. Moreover, equality (...)
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  38.  62
    Pradeep Dhillon (2011). The Role of Education in Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (3):249-259.
    Education lies at the heart of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR): ‘Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms’. However, when education is mentioned in the philosophical literature on human rights, or even within the literature on educational policy, it is usually within the context of its being treated as a specific right—as education as a human right rather than human rights education. (...)
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  39.  58
    Jennifer Wang (forthcoming). Fundamentality and Modal Freedom. Philosophical Perspectives.
    A fundamental entity is an entity that is ‘ontologically independent’; it does not depend on anything else for its existence or essence. It seems to follow that a fundamental entity is ‘modally free’ in some sense. This assumption, that fundamentality entails modal freedom (or ‘FEMF’ as I shall label the thesis), is used in the service of other arguments in metaphysics. But as I will argue, the road from fundamentality to modal freedom is not so straightforward. The defender (...)
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  40. Michael Garnett (2015). Agency and Inner Freedom. Noûs 50 (1).
    This paper concerns the relationship between two questions. The first is a question about inner freedom: What is it to be rendered unfree, not by external obstacles, but by aspects of oneself? The second is a question about agency: What is it to fail at being a thing that genuinely acts, and instead to be a thing that is merely acted upon, passive in relation to its own behaviour? It is widely believed that answers to the first question must (...)
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  41. Philip Pettit (1997). Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full-length presentation of a republican alternative to the liberal and communitarian theories that have dominated political philosophy in recent years. The latest addition to the acclaimed Oxford Political Theory series, Pettit's eloquent and compelling account opens with an examination of the traditional republican conception of freedom as non-domination, contrasting this with established negative and positive views of liberty. The first part of the book traces the rise and decline of this conception, displays its many (...)
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  42. Laura W. Ekstrom (ed.) (2001). Agency and Responsibility: Essays on the Metaphysics of Freedom. Westview.
    A companion volume to Free Will: A Philosophical Study, this new anthology collects influential essays on free will, including both well-known contemporary classics and exciting recent work. Agency and Responsibility: Essays on the Metaphysics of Freedom is divided into three parts. The essays in the first section address metaphysical issues concerning free will and causal determinism. The second section groups papers presenting a positive account of the nature of free action, including competing compatibilist and incompatibilist analyses. The third (...)
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  43.  37
    Baris Parkan (2009). On Multinational Corporations and the Provision of Positive Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):73 - 82.
    Increased and active involvement of multinational corporations in the promotion of social welfare, in developing countries in particular, through the facilitation of partnerships and cooperation with public and nonprofit sectors, challenges the existing framework of our social and political institutions, the boundaries of nation-states, the distinction between the private and public spheres of our lives, and thus our freedom. The blurring of certain distinctions, which ought to be observed between the political and the economic is most manifest in the (...)
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  44.  77
    Fabian Wendt (2011). Slaves, Prisoners, and Republican Freedom. Res Publica 17 (2):175-192.
    Philip Pettit’s republican conception of freedom is presented as an alternative both to negative and positive conceptions of freedom. The basic idea is to conceptualize freedom as non-domination, not as non-interference or self-mastery. When compared to negative freedom, Pettit’s republican conception comprises two controversial claims: the claim that we are unfree if we are dominated without actual interference, and the claim that we are free if we face interference without domination. Because the slave is a (...)
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  45.  7
    Donovan Miyasaki (2016). Feeling, Not Freedom: Nietzsche Against Agency. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):256-274.
    Despite his rejection of the metaphysical conception of freedom of the will, Nietzsche frequently makes positive use of the language of freedom, autonomy, self-mastery, self-overcoming, and creativity when describing his normative project of enhancing humanity through the promotion of its highest types. A number of interpreters have been misled by such language to conclude that Nietzsche accepts some version of compatibilism, holding a theory of natural causality that excludes metaphysical or “libertarian” freedom of the will, while (...)
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  46.  4
    Gary Taylor & Helen Hawley (2006). Health Promotion and the Freedom of the Individual. Health Care Analysis 14 (1):15-24.
    This article considers the extent to which health promotion strategies pose a threat to individual freedom. It begins by taking a look at health promotion strategies and at the historical development of health promotion in Britain. A theoretical context is then developed in which Berlin’s distinction between negative and positive liberty is used alongside the ideas of John Stuart Mill, Charles Taylor and T.H. Green to discuss the politics of health promotion and to identify the implications of conflicting (...)
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  47.  62
    Tyler Tritten (2010). Nature and Freedom: Repetition as Supplement in the Late Schelling. Sophia 49 (2):261-269.
    F.W.J. von Schelling’s positive philosophy of mythology and revelation questions how one can move from the natural (the negative or mythology) to freedom (the positive or revelation), i.e. from the natural to the supernatural. The move from nature to freedom surpasses the traditional metaphysics of presence. Being is not simply the presencing of nature but the result of a decisive deed surpassing and supplementing nature. Nature can do nothing other than presence. Freedom, however, could also (...)
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  48.  65
    Alix A. Cohen (2009). Kant's Concept of Freedom and the Human Sciences. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):pp. 113-135.
    The aim of this paper is to determine whether Kant’s account of freedom fits with his theory of the human sciences. Several Kant scholars have recently acknowledged a tension between Kant’s metaphysics and his works on anthropology in particular. I believe that in order to clarify the issue at stake, the tension between Kant’s metaphysics and his anthropology should be broken down into three distinct problems. -/- First, Kant’s Anthropology studies the human being ‘as a freely acting being.’5 This (...)
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  49.  1
    João Calinas Correia (2016). Flourishing and Freedom: Exploring Their Tensions and Their Relevance to Chronic Disease. Health Care Analysis 24 (2):148-160.
    In this paper I will briefly discuss flourishing and freedom, relating them to health and disease; discuss the tensions between flourishing and freedom; and exemplify how those discussions are relevant to chronic disease suffering. The concept of freedom has significant connections with the concepts of health, disability and disease. Understanding disease and disability in terms of the loss of aspects of freedom may help our understanding of the suffering that arises from chronic disease. On the other (...)
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  50.  56
    Nelkin Dana Kay (2011). Making Sense of Freedom and Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    Nelkin presents a simple and natural account of freedom and moral responsibility which responds to the great variety of challenges to the idea that we are free and responsible, before ultimately reaffirming our conception of ourselves as agents. Making Sense of Freedom and Responsibility begins with a defense of the rational abilities view, according to which one is responsible for an action if and only if one acts with the ability to recognize and act for good reasons. The (...)
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