Search results for 'Positive freedom' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Autonomy-Based Freedom (2007). Joseph Raz, From The Morality of Freedom (1986). In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 413.score: 150.0
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  2. Ability Freedom (2007). Part VII Freedom, Ability, and Economic Inequality. In Ian Carter, Matthew H. Kramer & Hillel Steiner (eds.), Freedom: A Philosophical Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 350.score: 150.0
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  3. Maria Dimova-Cookson (2012). Liberty as Welfare The Basecamp Counterpart of Positive Freedom. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 18 (2):133-165.score: 60.0
    L.T.Hobhouse's concept of liberty--the concept at the heart of new liberalism--is based on T.H. Green's positive freedom. However, this paper demonstrates that the former has its own distinct nature and can be usefully defined as 'liberty as welfare'. In a context of renewed interest in the link between liberty and ability/personal development, scholars have looked back to Green's positive liberty. But the complex nature of latter has led to scholarly disagreement about its definitive features. The paper argues (...)
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  4. Maria Dimova-Cookson (2003). A New Scheme of Positive and Negative Freedom: Reconstructing T. H. Green on Freedom. Political Theory 31 (4):508-532.score: 51.0
    This article offers a new scheme of the relation between positive and negative freedom that is based on a retrieval of T. H. Green's theory of freedom and on further reconstructions of his theory. Some of the distinctions in the literature have proven difficult to sustain, and this has resulted in a weakening of the dichotomy in principle, and of the concepts of positive and negative freedom independently of each other. The main distinction between negative (...)
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  5. John Christman (1991). Liberalism and Individual Positive Freedom. Ethics 101 (2):343-359.score: 45.0
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  6. Gerald C. MacCallum Jr (1967). Negative and Positive Freedom. Philosophical Review 76 (3):312-334.score: 45.0
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  7. John Christman (2005). Saving Positive Freedom. Political Theory 33 (1):79 - 88.score: 45.0
  8. James W. Allard (2010). T.H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom: From Metaphysics to Political Theory (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):538-539.score: 45.0
    Although T. H. Green is primarily remembered today as a moral and political philosopher, many of his philosophical concerns owe their origins to the Victorian crisis of faith in which a widespread belief in the literal truth of Scripture confronted seemingly incompatible scientific theories. Green attributed this crisis to the inability of science and religion to find accommodation in the popular version of empiricism widely accepted by educated men and women of his day. In his 371-page introduction to Hume’s Treatise, (...)
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  9. Avital Simhony (1993). Beyond Negative and Positive Freedom: T. H. Green's View of Freedom. Political Theory 21 (1):28-54.score: 45.0
  10. Morton White (1973). Positive Freedom, Negative Freedom, and Possibility. Journal of Philosophy 70 (11):309-317.score: 45.0
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  11. Martin van Hees (2003). Acting Autonomously Versus Not Acting Heteronomously. Theory and Decision 54 (4):337-355.score: 45.0
    This paper presents a formal framework that purports to capture some aspects of Kant's theory of freedom. In particular, we argue that the analysis sheds further light on Kant's distinction between a negative and a positive concept of freedom. The paper shows that the two concepts are not equivalent: we not only argue that in a Kantian perspective negative freedom need not entail positive freedom, but also that there are situations in which a person (...)
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  12. Paul Brazier (2007). T. H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom (British Idealist Studies, Series 3: Green). By Ben Wempet. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics and Political Philosophy. Edited by Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1007–1010.score: 45.0
  13. Nobel Ang (2014). Positive Freedom as Exercise of Rational Ability: A Kantian Defense of Positive Liberty. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (1):1-16.score: 45.0
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  14. Boris DeWiel (2010). Freedom as Creativity: On the Origin of the Positive Concept of Liberty. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):42-57.score: 45.0
    The concept of positive liberty includes both the regulative autonomy to do what we will and the constitutive autonomy to become what we will. However, the latter represents the full meaning of the idea. Liberty in this meaning is a creative power: we are most free in the positive sense when we give our defining constitutive rules to ourselves. The original conceptual model for liberty as creativity did not belong to classical Greek tradition but came to us from (...)
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  15. Saulius Arlauskas & Daiva Petrėnaitė (2013). The Principle of Freedom in the Law of Democratic Country. Jurisprudence 20 (2):407-428.score: 45.0
    Although the need of freedom is definite, the concept of individual freedom, while being interpreted with legal terms, causes not only theoretical, but also practical problems. The observed two extremes of freedom are defined as any human self-expression as well as the license, where the state power is generally attributed to disregard personal freedom. In this article the freedom of expression and state enforcement jurisdiction dichotomy are addressed by discussing positive and negative conceptions of (...)
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  16. Marianne Boenink & Simone van der Burg (2010). Informed Decision Making About Predictive DNA Tests: Arguments for More Public Visibility of Personal Deliberations About the Good Life. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):127-138.score: 45.0
    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of people’s life. The decision whether or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes (...)
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  17. Wolfgang Gil (2012). Platón contra la democracia. O las desventuras de la sinergia. Apuntes Filosóficos 19 (37):109-124.score: 45.0
    El propósito de este ensayo es explorar la doctrina política de Platón sobre la democracia a partir del concepto sinergia, es decir, de poder sinérgico, colaboración creativa que reduce los grados de dominación en el régimen político, tal como lo entiende James Craig. Aunque el concepto de poder sinérgico no fue conocido por Platón y ha sido descuidado tanto por la politología como por la filosofía política, considero que es el criterio indispensable para dejar en claro muchas de las ambigüedades (...)
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  18. Kenneth Minogue (1995). The Positive Side of Freedom. In E. Barker (ed.), Lse on Freedom. Lse Books. 29.score: 39.0
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  19. Adrian Blau (2004). Against Positive and Negative Freedom. Political Theory 32 (4):547-553.score: 36.0
  20. Jan Narveson (1998). Libertarianism Vs. Marxism: Reflections on G. A. Cohen's Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 2 (1):1-26.score: 36.0
    Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality is G.A. Cohens attempt to rescue something of the socialist outlook on society from the challenge of libertarianism, which Cohen identifies with the work of Robert Nozick in his famous book, Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Sympathizing with the leading idea that a person must belong to himself, and thus be unavailable for forced redistribution of his efforts, Cohen is at pains to reconcile the two. This cannot be done – they are flatly contrary. Moreover, (...)
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  21. Peter Woolcock (1995). Hunt and Berlin on Positive and Negative Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):458 – 464.score: 36.0
  22. Pradeep Dhillon (2011). The Role of Education in Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (3):249-259.score: 36.0
    Education lies at the heart of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR): ‘Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms’. However, when education is mentioned in the philosophical literature on human rights, or even within the literature on educational policy, it is usually within the context of its being treated as a specific right—as education as a human right rather than human rights education. (...)
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  23. Ian Hunt (1995). A Note on Woolcock's Defence of Berlin on Positive and Negative Freedom. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (3):465 – 471.score: 36.0
  24. Gyorgy Markus (1999). On Freedom: Positive and Negative. Constellations 6 (3):273-289.score: 36.0
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  25. Louis Groarke (2007). Freedom: Political, Metaphysical, Negative and Positive. By Yildiz Silier. Heythrop Journal 48 (6):1018–1019.score: 36.0
  26. Christopher J. Insole (2004). The Worship of Freedom: Negative and Positive Notions of Liberty in Philosophy of Religion and Political Philosophy. Heythrop Journal 45 (2):209–226.score: 36.0
  27. James A. Gould (1982). Positive and Negative Economic Freedom. Crítica 14 (41):55 - 64.score: 36.0
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  28. G. J. Fritzberg (2002). Freedom That Counts: The Historic Underpinnings of Positive Libarty and Equality of Educational Opportunity. Journal of Thought 37 (2):7-20.score: 36.0
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  29. S. D. Kaplan (2000). Beyond Positive and Negative Liberty: Samuel Fleischacker's Personal Freedom of Judgment. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (2):165-184.score: 36.0
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  30. Arto Laitinen, Social Equality, Recognition, and Preconditions of Good Life. Social Inequality Today.score: 30.0
    In this paper I analyze interpersonal and institutional recognition and discuss the relation of different types of recognition to various principles of social justice (egalitarianism, meritarianism, legitimate favouritism, principles of need and free exchange). Further, I try to characterize contours of good autonomous life, and ask what kind of preconditions it has. I will distinguish between five kinds of preconditions: psychological, material, cultural, intersubjective and institutional. After examining what the role of recognition is among such preconditions, and how they figure (...)
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  31. Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O'Mathúna & P. Anne Scott (2012). Patient Autonomy and Choice in Healthcare: Self-Testing Devices as a Case in Point. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that self-testing provides a (...)
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  32. Laura W. Ekstrom (ed.) (2001). Agency and Responsibility: Essays on the Metaphysics of Freedom. Westview.score: 27.0
    A companion volume to Free Will: A Philosophical Study , this new anthology collects influential essays on free will, including both well-known contemporary classics and exciting recent work. Agency and Responsibility: Essays on the Metaphysics of Freedom is divided into three parts. The essays in the first section address metaphysical issues concerning free will and causal determinism. The second section groups papers presenting a positive account of the nature of free action, including competing compatibilist and incompatibilist analyses. The (...)
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  33. Fabian Wendt (2011). Slaves, Prisoners, and Republican Freedom. Res Publica 17 (2):175-192.score: 27.0
    Philip Pettit’s republican conception of freedom is presented as an alternative both to negative and positive conceptions of freedom. The basic idea is to conceptualize freedom as non-domination, not as non-interference or self-mastery. When compared to negative freedom, Pettit’s republican conception comprises two controversial claims: the claim that we are unfree if we are dominated without actual interference, and the claim that we are free if we face interference without domination. Because the slave is a (...)
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  34. Baris Parkan (2009). On Multinational Corporations and the Provision of Positive Rights. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):73 - 82.score: 27.0
    Increased and active involvement of multinational corporations in the promotion of social welfare, in developing countries in particular, through the facilitation of partnerships and cooperation with public and nonprofit sectors, challenges the existing framework of our social and political institutions, the boundaries of nation-states, the distinction between the private and public spheres of our lives, and thus our freedom. The blurring of certain distinctions, which ought to be observed between the political and the economic is most manifest in the (...)
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  35. Tyler Tritten (2010). Nature and Freedom: Repetition as Supplement in the Late Schelling. Sophia 49 (2):261-269.score: 27.0
    F.W.J. von Schelling’s positive philosophy of mythology and revelation questions how one can move from the natural (the negative or mythology) to freedom (the positive or revelation), i.e. from the natural to the supernatural. The move from nature to freedom surpasses the traditional metaphysics of presence. Being is not simply the presencing of nature but the result of a decisive deed surpassing and supplementing nature. Nature can do nothing other than presence. Freedom, however, could also (...)
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  36. Gary Taylor & Helen Hawley (2006). Health Promotion and the Freedom of the Individual. Health Care Analysis 14 (1):15-24.score: 27.0
    This article considers the extent to which health promotion strategies pose a threat to individual freedom. It begins by taking a look at health promotion strategies and at the historical development of health promotion in Britain. A theoretical context is then developed in which Berlin’s distinction between negative and positive liberty is used alongside the ideas of John Stuart Mill, Charles Taylor and T.H. Green to discuss the politics of health promotion and to identify the implications of conflicting (...)
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  37. Jerome C. Wakefield (2010). False Positives in Psychiatric Diagnosis: Implications for Human Freedom. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):5-17.score: 25.0
    Current symptom-based DSM and ICD diagnostic criteria for mental disorders are prone to yielding false positives because they ignore the context of symptoms. This is often seen as a benign flaw because problems of living and emotional suffering, even if not true disorders, may benefit from support and treatment. However, diagnosis of a disorder in our society has many ramifications not only for treatment choice but for broader social reactions to the diagnosed individual. In particular, mental disorders impose a sick (...)
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  38. Jaunius Gumbis, Vytaute Bacianskaite & Jurgita Randakeviciute (2010). Human Rights Today. Jurisprudence 119 (1):125-145.score: 25.0
    In the twenty-first century, human rights play a very important role in modern society. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, released on 10 December 1948th was thought to become an everlasting source of fundamental human rights and freedoms. The Declaration corresponds to the situation that global community was facing 60 years ago. Today it is a collection of articles that is the cornerstone of the whole system of human rights protection. However, gross human rights atrocities, the dynamic process of legislation, (...)
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  39. Nigel Warburton (2001). Freedom: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Warburton assesses the key arguments for and against individual freedom in this book. Each chapter considers a fundamental argument on individual freedom, including the concepts of negative and positive freedom, freedom of belief, the Harm Principle, and freedom of speech and expression. With readings from Mill, Berlin and Taylor.
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  40. Tito Magri (1998). Negative Freedom, Rational Deliberation, and Non-Satiating Goods. Topoi 17 (2):97-105.score: 24.0
    Negative freedom (as opposed to positive freedom) has been widely considered an inherently non problematic notion. This paper attempts to show that, if considered as a good with a minimally objective structure, negative freedom can disrupt the capacity for deliberating in a substantively (that is, non purely formal, decision-theoretic) rational way. The argument turns on the notion of non-satiation, as a property of the objective value of some goods of not changing when the availability of the (...)
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  41. Allison Weir (2013). Feminism and the Islamic Revival: Freedom as a Practice of Belonging. Hypatia 28 (2):323-340.score: 24.0
    In her book, Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject, Saba Mahmood analyzes the practices of the women in the mosque movement in Cairo, Egypt. Mahmood argues that in order to recognize the participants as agents, we need to question the assumption that agency entails resistance to norms; moreover, we need to question the feminist allegiance to an unquestioned ideal of freedom. In this paper, I argue that rather than giving up the ideal of freedom, (...)
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  42. J. H. M. M. Lohnen (1976). The Concept of Freedom in Berlin and Others: An Attempt at Clarification. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 10 (4):279-285.score: 24.0
    The paper considers some questions of a conceptual nature as regards freedom of the individual in a socio-Political and socio-Cultural context. Some of its main points may be stated as follows: 1) there are (at least) two lexicographical definitions of freedom in english, The first conceptually centered around the idea of 'not being interfered with from without', The second around 'not being determined from without'. For both concepts more precise definitions are proposed. 2) the terms 'negative' and ' (...)' freedom are apt to lead to confusion of various kinds and are better avoided. 3) an adequate definition of 'freedom as non-Interference' should include the idea of a minimum level. (shrink)
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  43. Yossi Yonah (2000). Parental Choice in Israel's Educational System: Theory Vs. Praxis. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):445-464.score: 24.0
    In the last two decades the Israeli educational system has undergone major changes which have transformed it from a state-controlled, overly bureaucratic and almost fully state-financed system into a decentralized, partly locally controlled and increasingly privately financed system. Advocates of this transformation of the educational system appeal to the ideal of parental choice. They argue that the implementation of parental choice programs in education shows more respect to the children and their unique talents, take their self-realization seriously and promotes equal (...)
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  44. Ian Shapiro (2009). Reflections on Skinner and Pettit. Hobbes Studies 22 (2):185-191.score: 24.0
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  45. Agnieszka Nogal (2009). The Concept of Freedom in Henryk Elzenberg's Thought. Dialogue and Universalism 19 (8-9):135-140.score: 24.0
    Elzenberg opposes the rightness of violence. This is a horizon on which appears a space for freedom in its two dimensions, which contemporarily is defined as negative and positive. Elzenberg’s negative freedom—necessary and essential—is freedom from one’s own biologicality but also from violence, whilst positive freedom—desired and valuable—the freedom to pursue values, is conditioned by the first.Man can be enslaved by his own body, the force applied by political authority or by ideology. He (...)
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  46. Philip Pettit (1997). Republicanism: A Theory of Freedom and Government. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    This is the first full-length presentation of a republican alternative to the liberal and communitarian theories that have dominated political philosophy in recent years. The latest addition to the acclaimed Oxford Political Theory series, Pettit's eloquent and compelling account opens with an examination of the traditional republican conception of freedom as non-domination, contrasting this with established negative and positive views of liberty. The first part of the book traces the rise and decline of this conception, displays its many (...)
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  47. Jessica M. Wilson (2010). Non-Reductive Physicalism and Degrees of Freedom. British Journal for Philosophy of Science 61 (2):279-311.score: 21.0
    Some claim that Non-reductive Physicalism (NRP) is an unstable position, on grounds that NRP either collapses into reductive physicalism (contra Non-reduction ), or expands into emergentism of a robust or ‘strong’ variety (contra Physicalism ). I argue that this claim is unfounded, by attention to the notion of a degree of freedom—roughly, an independent parameter needed to characterize an entity as being in a state functionally relevant to its law-governed properties and behavior. I start by distinguishing three relations that (...)
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  48. Peter Adamson (2003). Al-Kindi and the Mu‘Tazila: Divine Attributes, Creation and Freedom. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):45-77.score: 21.0
    The paper discusses al-Kindi's response to doctrines held by contemporary theologians of the Mu‘tazilite school: divine attributes, creation, and freedom. In the first section it is argued that, despite his broadly negative theology, al-Kindi recognizes a special kind of “essential” positive attribute belonging to God. The second section argues that al-Kindi agreed with the Mu‘tazila in holding that something may not yet exist but still be an object of God's knowledge and power (as the Mu‘tazila put it, that (...)
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  49. Susanne Bobzien (1997). Stoic Conceptions of Freedom and Their Relation to Ethics. Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 41 (S68):71-89.score: 21.0
    ABSTRACT: In contemporary discussions of freedom in Stoic philosophy we often encounter the following assumptions: (i) the Stoics discussed the problem of free will and determinis; (ii) since in Stoic philosophy freedom of the will is in the end just an illusion, the Stoics took the freedom of the sage as a substitute for it and as the only true freedom; (iii) in the c. 500 years of live Stoic philosophical debate, the Stoics were largely concerned (...)
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  50. Meghan Griffith (2007). Freedom and Trying: Understanding Agent-Causal Exertions. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 22 (1):16-28.score: 21.0
    In this paper, I argue that trying is the locus of freedom and moral responsibility. Thus, any plausible view of free and responsible action must accommodate and account for free tryings. I then consider a version of agent causation whereby the agent directly causes her tryings. On this view, the agent is afforded direct control over her efforts and there is no need to posit—as other agent-causal theorists do—an uncaused event. I discuss the potential advantages of this sort of (...)
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