Search results for 'Positivism History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Lee Braver (2014). Robert C. Scharff: How History Matters to Philosophy: Reconsidering Philosophy’s Past After Positivism. Human Studies 37 (4):583-587.
    Robert C. Scharff has written what we might call, after Nietzsche, a timely meditation. It is timely in that it is aimed at our particular time , and it is a meditation on timeliness, on what it means to do philosophy within time and history . These two topics meet in his depiction of our time as one that is either not fully aware of or that actively suppresses its own timeliness, its own determination by its time and historical (...)
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  2. Robert C. Scharff (2014). How History Matters to Philosophy: Reconsidering Philosophy's Past After Positivism. Routledge.
    In recent decades, widespread rejection of positivism’s notorious hostility toward the philosophical tradition has led to renewed debate about the real relationship of philosophy to its history. How History Matters to Philosophy takes a fresh look at this debate. Current discussion usually starts with the question of whether philosophy’s past should matter, but Scharff argues that the very existence of the debate itself demonstrates that it already does matter. After an introductory review of the recent literature, he (...)
     
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  3. Robert C. Scharff (2015). How History Matters to Philosophy: Reconsidering Philosophy’s Past After Positivism. Routledge.
    In recent decades, widespread rejection of positivism’s notorious hostility toward the philosophical tradition has led to renewed debate about the real relationship of philosophy to its history. _How History Matters to Philosophy_ takes a fresh look at this debate. Current discussion usually starts with the question of whether philosophy’s past _should_ matter, but Scharff argues that the very existence of the debate itself demonstrates that it already _does_ matter. After an introductory review of the recent literature, he (...)
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  4. Robert C. Scharff (2014). How History Matters to Philosophy: Reconsidering Philosophy’s Past After Positivism. Routledge.
    In recent decades, widespread rejection of positivism’s notorious hostility toward the philosophical tradition has led to renewed debate about the real relationship of philosophy to its history. _How History Matters to Philosophy_ takes a fresh look at this debate. Current discussion usually starts with the question of whether philosophy’s past _should_ matter, but Scharff argues that the very existence of the debate itself demonstrates that it already _does_ matter. After an introductory review of the recent literature, he (...)
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  5. Wolfhard F. Boeselager (1975). The Soviet Critique of Neopositivism: The History and Structure of the Critique of Logical Positivism and Related Doctrines by Soviet Philosophers in the Years 1947-1967. Reidel Pub. Co..
  6.  3
    Viktor Kraft (1969). The Vienna Circle the Origin of Neo-Positivism : A Chapter in the History of Recent Philosophy. Greenwood.
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  7. Heinrich Rickert (1962). Science and History a Critique of Positivist Epistemolggy. Van Nostrand.
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  8.  63
    Raymond Martin (1981). Beyond Positivism: A Research Program for Philosophy of History. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):112-121.
    It is argued that the debate over the positivist theory of historical explanation has made only a limited contribution to our understanding of how historians should defend the explanations they propose importantly because both positivists and their critics tacitly accepted two assumptions. The first assumption is that if the positivist analysis of historical explanation is correct, then historians ought to attempt to defend covering laws for each of the explanations they propose. The second is that unless a historian can justify (...)
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  9.  3
    Mary Hesse (1974). The Alienation of Reason. A History of Positivist Thought by Leszek Kolakowski; Norbert Guterman. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 65:103-104.
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  10.  1
    Alan Spitzer (1964). European Positivism in the Nineteenth Century. An Essay in Intellectual History by W. M. Simon. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 55:469-470.
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  11.  11
    Harold A. Larrabee (1932). A Crusade for Humanity: The History of Organized Positivism in England. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 29 (8):220-222.
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  12. Simo Knuuttila (ed.) (1988). Modern Modalities: Studies of the History of Modal Theories From Medieval Nominalism to Logical Positivism. Kluwer.
  13.  19
    Henry A. Giroux (1979). Schooling and the Culture of Positivism: Notes on the Death of History. Educational Theory 29 (4):263-284.
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  14.  6
    A. W. W. (1968). Book Review:The Alienation of Reason: A History of Positivist Thought. Leszak Kolakowski. [REVIEW] Ethics 79 (1):86-.
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  15.  2
    J. B. R. (1968). The Alienation of Reason: A History of Positivist Thought. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 22 (1):146-147.
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  16.  5
    D. W. Hands (2002). Reconsidering the Received View of theReceived View'A Review of Michael Friedman's Reconsidering Logical Positivism,; Steve Fuller's Thomas Kuhn: A Philosophical History for Our Times,; and Imre Lakatos and Paul Feyerabend's For and Against Method. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):93-99.
  17.  2
    John Edwin Mcgee (1932). A Crusade for Humanity: The History of Organized Positivism in England. Journal of Philosophy 29 (8):220-222.
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  18.  3
    Alonzo Church (1955). Review: Victor Kraft, The Vienna Circle. The Origin of Neo-Positivism. A Chapter in the History of Recent Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (1):62-63.
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  19.  11
    William Dray (1962). Professor Child on Neo-Positivism and History. Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):100-106.
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  20.  1
    Annie Petit (1995). L'héritage du Positivisme Dans la Création de la Chaire d'Histoire Générale des Sciences au Collège de France/Positivism's Heritage in the Creation of the Chair in General History of Sciences at the Collège de France. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (4):521-556.
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  21.  4
    Mortimer Taube (1937). Positivism, Science, and History. Journal of Philosophy 34 (8):205-210.
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  22.  1
    Frances E. Gillespie (1932). Book Review:A Crusade for Humanity. The History of Organized Positivism in England. John Edwin McGee. [REVIEW] Ethics 42 (3):380-.
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  23. G. Lanaro (1988). Lewes, George, Henry Between Comte and Mill-an Episode in the History of British Positivism. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 43 (1):77-102.
     
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  24. John Edwin Mcgee (1931). A Crusade for Humanity: History of Organized Positivism in England. By Frances E. Gillespie. [REVIEW] Ethics 42:380.
     
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  25. Is Narskij (1977). Lots of Positivist Conception of History of Philosophy. Filosoficky Casopis 25 (2):243-254.
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  26. Annie Petit (2005). L'enseignement Positiviste: Auxiliaire Ou Obstacle Pour l'Histoire des Sciences?/Positivist Teaching: Auxiliary or Obstacle for History of Science? Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 58 (2):329-366.
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  27. Annie Petit (1995). Positivism's Heritage in the Creation of the Chair in General History of Sciences at the College de France. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 48 (4):521-556.
     
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  28. Annie Petit (2005). Thematic Files-Teaching History of Science in France Under the Third Republic-Positivist Teaching: Auxiliary or Obstacle for History of Science? Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 58 (2):329-366.
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  29. R. Winkler (2015). Is History as a Science Possible? Historical Duree and the Critique of Positivism. Télos 2015 (172):163-186.
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  30. T. R. Wright (1986). The Religion of Humanity: The Impact of Comtean Positivism on Victorian Britain. Cambridge University Press.
    The Religion of Humanity, first expounded by the founder of Positivism, Auguste Comte, focused the minds of a wide range of prominent Victorians on the possibility of replacing Christianity with an alternative religion based on scientific principles and humanist values. This new book traces the impact of Comte's 'religion' on Victorian Britain, showing how its ideas were championed by John Stuart Mill and George Henry Lewes before being institutionalised by Richard Congreve and Frederic Harrison, the leaders of the two (...)
     
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  31.  9
    Ethan Kleinberg (2012). Back to Where We've Never Been: Heidegger, Levinas, and Derrida on Tradition and History. History and Theory 51 (4):114-135.
    This paper will address the topic of “tradition” by exploring the ways that Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jacques Derrida each looked to return to traditional texts in order to overcome a perceived crisis or delimiting fault in the contemporary thought of their respective presents. For Heidegger, this meant a return to the pre-Socratics of “early Greek thinking.” For Levinas, it entailed a return to the sacred Jewish texts of the Talmud. For Derrida, it was the return to texts that (...)
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  32.  32
    Alan W. Richardson (1998). Carnap's Construction of the World: The Aufbau and the Emergence of Logical Empiricism. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the history of analytic philosophy in general and of logical positivism in particular. It provides the first detailed and comprehensive study of Rudolf Carnap, one of the most influential figures in twentieth-century philosophy. The focus of the book is Carnap's first major work: Der logische Aufbau der Welt (The Logical Structure of the World). It reveals tensions within the context of German epistemology and philosophy of science in the early twentieth century. (...)
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  33.  55
    Andrew Wernick (2001). Auguste Comte and the Religion of Humanity: The Post-Theistic Program of French Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers an exciting re-interpretation of Auguste Comte, the founder of French sociology. Following the development of his philosophy of positivism, Comte later focused on the importance of the emotions in his philosophy resulting in the creation of a new religious system, the Religion of Humanity. Andrew Wernick provides the first in-depth critique of Comte's concept of religion and its place in his thinking on politics, sociology and philosophy of science. He places Comte's ideas in the context of (...)
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  34.  5
    Balázs Trencsényi (2010). Writing the Nation and Reframing Early Modern Intellectual History in Hungary. Studies in East European Thought 62 (2):135 - 154.
    The article traces the development of Hungarian intellectual history of the early modern period from the emergence of the national romantic constructions of literary history to the recent turn towards contextualist and conceptual history. One of its main findings is the ideological importance of this period for the formation of the national canon, as it became a central point of reference for the emerging local methodological tradition of intellectual history, even if it was often compartamentalized under (...)
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  35. Maurice Campbell Cornforth (1962/1975). Science Versus Idealism: In Defence of Philosophy Against Positivism and Pragmatism. Greenwood Press.
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  36. Michael Friedman (1999). Reconsidering Logical Positivism. Cambridge University Press.
    In this collection of essays one of the preeminent philosophers of science writing today offers a reinterpretation of the enduring significance of logical positivism, the revolutionary philosophical movement centered around the Vienna Circle in the 1920s and '30s. Michael Friedman argues that the logical positivists were radicals not by presenting a new version of empiricism (as is often thought to be the case) but rather by offering a new conception of a priori knowledge and its role in empirical knowledge. (...)
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  37. Ericka Tucker (2013). The Subject of History: Historical Subjectivity and Historical Science. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):205-229.
    In this paper, I show how the phenomenological and hermeneutic traditions and method converge on their treatment of the historical subject. Thinkers from both traditions claim that subjectivity is shaped by a historical worldview. Each tradition provides an account of how these worldviews are shaped, and thus how essentially historical subjective experience is molded. I argue that both traditions, although offering helpful ways of understanding the way history shapes subjectivity, go too far in their epistemic claims for the (...)
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  38.  51
    Stefano Gattei (2008). Thomas Kuhn's 'Linguistic Turn' and the Legacy of Logical Empiricism: Incommensurability, Rationality and the Search for Truth. Ashgate Pub..
    Presenting a critical history of the philosophy of science in the twentieth century, focusing on the transition from logical positivism in its first half to the ...
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  39.  6
    M. Anthony Mills (2015). Explicating Meyerson: The Critique of Positivism and Historical Épistémologie. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (2):318-347.
    To many contemporary scholars, Émile Meyerson is a footnote in an obscure history: early twentieth-century French philosophy of science. While the traditions of épistémologie are beginning to enjoy the scrutiny they deserve, Meyerson’s role remains overlooked. This article provides an overview of Meyerson’s philosophical project to help sow the seeds for a more systematic recuperation of its legacy. By orienting his work historically, I elucidate the nature of Meyerson’s critique of positivism, his distinctive method, and the implications these (...)
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  40.  49
    Naomi Choi (2007). Interpretivism in Jurisprudence: What Difference Does the Philosophy of History Make to the Philosophy of Law? Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (3):365-393.
    To answer the question of what difference the philosophy of history makes to the philosophy of law this paper begins by calling attention to the way that Ronald Dworkin's interpretive theory of law is supposed to upend legal positivism. My analysis shows how divergent theories about what law and the basis of legal authority is are supported by divergent points of view about what concepts are, how they operate within social practices, and how we might best give account (...)
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  41.  15
    Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2009). Between Science and Literature: The Debate on the Status of History. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 97 (1):7-30.
    The author in terms of idealizational theory of science explicates two approaches to history represented by positivism (Hempel) and narrativism (White). According to positivism, history is branch of science, according to narrativism, history is closer to literature. In the second part of this paper, the author paraphrases some paradoxes of historical narrative elaborated by mentioned-above representatives of these standpoints what is argument for unity of scientific methods presupposed by idealizational theory of science.
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  42.  25
    Joe Cain (2000). Woodger, Positivism, and the Evolutionary Synthesis. Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):535-551.
    In Unifying Biology, Smocovitis offers a series of claimsregarding the relationship between key actors in the synthesisperiod of evolutionary studies and positivism, especially claimsentailing Joseph Henry Woodger and the Unity of Science Movement.This commentary examines Woodger''s possible relevance to key synthesis actors and challenges Smocovitis'' arguments for theexplanatory relevance of logical positivism, and positivism moregenerally, to synthesis history. Under scrutiny, these arguments areshort on evidence and subject to substantial conceptual confusion.Though plausible, Smocovitis'' minimal interpretation – that (...)
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  43.  25
    Stephen K. McLeod (2001). Modality and Anti-Metaphysics. Ashgate.
    Modality and Anti-Metaphysics critically examines the most prominent approaches to modality among analytic philosophers in the twentieth century, including essentialism. Defending both the project of metaphysics and the essentialist position that metaphysical modality is conceptually and ontologically primitive, Stephen McLeod argues that the logical positivists did not succeed in banishing metaphysical modality from their own theoretical apparatus and he offers an original defence of metaphysics against their advocacy of its elimination. -/- Seeking to assuage the sceptical worries which underlie modal (...)
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  44.  72
    James E. Young (1997). Toward a Received History of the Holocaust. History and Theory 36 (4):21–43.
    In this article, I examine both the problem of so-called postmodern history as it relates to the Holocaust and suggest the ways that Saul Friedlander's recent work successfully mediates between the somewhat overly polemicized positions of "relativist" and "positivist" history. In this context, I find that in his search for an adequately self-reflexive historical narrative for the Holocaust, Hayden White's proposed notion of "middle-voicedness" may recommend itself more as a process for eyewitness writers than as a style for (...)
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  45.  1
    Antti Saari (forthcoming). Knowledge Without Contexts? A Foucauldian Analysis of E.L. Thorndike’s Positivist Educational Research. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-15.
    The article discusses the allegedly decontextualized and ahistorical traits in positivist educational research and curriculum by examining its emergence in early twentieth-century empirical education. Edward Lee Thorndike’s educational psychology is analyzed as a case in point. It will be shown that Thorndike’s positivist educational psychology stressed the need to account for the reality of schooling and to produce knowledge of the actual contexts of education. Furthermore, a historical analysis informed by Michel Foucault’s history of the human sciences reveals that (...)
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  46.  25
    James T. Kloppenberg (2004). Pragmatism and the Practice of History: From Turner and Du Bois to Today. Metaphilosophy 35 (1-2):202-225.
    Pragmatism has affected American historical writing since the early twentieth century. Such contemporaries and students of Peirce, James, and Dewey as Frederick Jackson Turner, W. E. B. Du Bois, James Harvey Robinson, Charles Beard, Mary Beard, and Carl Becker drew on pragmatism when they fashioned what was called the “new history.” They wanted to topple inherited assumptions about the past and replace positivist historical methods with the pragmatists' model of a community of inquiry. Such widely read mid-twentieth-century historians as (...)
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  47. M. A. Notturno (1997). Thomas Kuhn and the Legacy of Logical Positivism. History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):131-134.
    Thomas Kuhn died last June, and with him the last of the great 20th-century\nphilosophers of science passed into history. In order to understand this\nhistory, it is necessary to understand Kuhn’s relationship to what came before\nhim. Logical positivism is what came before Kuhn. And many people misunderstand\nthe relationship between the two. Michael Friedman’s account is\nrepresentative. Friedman writes that the ’official demise of’ logical positivism\n’took place sometime between the publication of W. V Quine’s ’Two Dogmas\nof Empiricism’ (1951), and that (...)
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  48.  65
    Alexander Stehn (2012). From Positivism to ‘Anti-Positivism’ in Mexico: Some Notable Continuities. In Gregory Gilson & Irving Levinson (eds.), Latin American Positivism: New Historical and Philosophic Essays. Lexington Books 49.
    A general consensus has emerged in the scholarship on Latin American thought dating from the latter half of the nineteenth century through the first quarter of the twentieth. Latin American intellectuals widely adapted the European philosophy of positivism in keeping with the demands of their own social and political contexts, effectively making positivism the second most important philosophical tradition in the history of Latin America, after scholasticism. However, as thinkers across Latin America faced the challenges of the (...)
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  49.  14
    Juha Manninen & Friedrich Stadler (eds.) (2010). The Vienna Circle in the Nordic Countries: Networks and Transformations of Logical Empiricism. Springer Science + Business Media.
    One of the key events in the relations between the Central European philosophers and those of the Nordic countries was the Second International Congress for the ...
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  50.  64
    Alexander Bird (2004). Kuhn, Naturalism and the Positivist Legacy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 35 (2):337-56.
    I defend against criticism the following claims concening Thomas Kuhn: (i) there is a strong naturalist streak in The structure of scientific revolutions, whereby Kuhn used the results of a posteriori enquiry in addressing philosophical questions; (ii) as Kuhn's career as a philosopher of science developed he tended to drop the naturalistic elements and to replace them with more traditionally philosophical a prior approaches; (iii) at the same there is a significant residue of positivist thought in Kuhm, which Kuhn did (...)
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