Search results for 'Postmodernism and education' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anthony Smith, Frank Webster & Society for Research Into Higher Education (1997). The Postmodern University? Contested Visions of Higher Education in Society.
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  2. Thomas F. Green & National Academy of Education (1976). Images of Education in Kyklios Paideia. National Academy of Education.
     
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  3. M. G. Mason, A. G. L. Ventre & Carnegie College of Physical Education (1965). Elements of Physical Education. [Thistie Books,].
     
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  4. Lucie-Mami Noor Nkakâe, International Bureau of Education & Unesco (1996). L''education Áa la Compr'ehension Internationale Une Id'ee Qui Fait Son Chemin. Bureau International d'Âeducation Unesco.
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  5. Jonas F. Soltis & National Society for the Study of Education (1981). Philosophy and Education. National Society for the Study of Education Distributed by the University of Chicago Press.
     
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  6. R. A. Smith & Philip Wexler (1995). After Postmodernism Education, Politics, and Identity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  7. Robin Usher (1994). Postmodernism and Education. Routledge.
    Postmodernism and Education responds to the interest in postmodernism as a way of understanding social, cultural and economic trends. Robin Usher and Richard Edwards explore the impact which postmodernism has had upon the theory and practice of education, using a broad analysis of postmodernism and an in-depth introduction to key writers in the field, including Lacan, Derrida, Foucault and Lyotard. In examining the impact which this thinking has had upon contemporary theory and practice of (...)
     
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  8. Kaya Yilmaz (2010). Postmodernism and its Challenge to the Discipline of History: Implications for History Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (7):779-795.
    There is a confusion over and inchoate understanding of how the past is made understandable through postmodernist historical orientation. The purpose of the article is to outline the characteristic features of the postmodernist movement in social sciences, to explain its confrontation with history, to document its critique of the conventional practice of history, and to discuss its implications for history education. The postmodernist challenge to the foundations of the discipline of history is elucidated with an emphasis on its epistemological (...)
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  9.  27
    Roland M. Schulz (2007). Lyotard, Postmodernism and Science Education: A Rejoinder to Zembylas. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):633–656.
    Although postmodernist thought has become prominent in some educational circles, its influence on science education has until recently been rather minor. This paper examines the proposal of Michalinos Zembylas, published earlier in this journal, that Lyotardian postmodernism should be applied to science educational reform in order to achieve the much sought after positive transformation. As a preliminary to this examination several critical points are raised about Lyotard's philosophy of education and philosophy of science which serve to challenge (...)
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  10.  8
    Jim Mackenzie, Ron Good & James Robert Brown (2014). Postmodernism and Science Education: An Appraisal. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 1057-1086.
    Over the past 50 years, postmodernism has been a progressively growing and influential intellectual movement inside and outside the academy. Postmodernism is characterised by rejection of parts or the whole of the Enlightenment project that had its roots in the birth and embrace of early modern science. While Enlightenment and ‘modernist’ ideas of universalism, of intellectual and cultural progress, of the possibility of finding truths about the natural and social world and of rejection of absolutism and authoritarianism in (...)
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  11. Nigel Blake (ed.) (1998). Thinking Again: Education After Postmodernism. Bergin & Garvey.
  12. Richard Taylor, Jean Barr & Tom Steele (2004). For a Radical Higher Education: After Postmodernism. British Journal of Educational Studies 52 (2):210-213.
     
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  13. D. Hill, P. Mclaren, M. Cole & G. Rikowski (1999). Postmodernism in Educational Theory Education and the Politics of Human Resistance. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  14. Michael Peters (2011). The Last Book of Postmodernism: Apocalyptic Thinking, Philosophy and Education in the Twenty-First Century. P. Lang.
  15.  7
    John A. Clark (2006). Michael Peters' Lyotardian Account of Postmodernism and Education: Some Epistemic Problems and Naturalistic Solutions. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (3):391–405.
    Postmodernism has established a significant hold in educational thought and some of the most important ideas are to be found in the writings of Michael Peters. This paper examines his postmodern stance and use of Lyotard's account of knowledge, and from a naturalist point of view raises a number of objections centred on science as a metanarrative, the unity of the empirical and the evaluative, and reason, truth and the growth of knowledge. It is concluded that postmodern epistemology, unlike (...)
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  16.  10
    A. M. Sidorkin (1999). The Fine Art of Sitting on Two Stools: Multicultural Education Between Postmodernism and Critical Theory. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (3):143-156.
    The paper examines two philosophical origins of multicultural education -- postmodern philosophy and critical theory. Critical theory is closely connected to grand narrative of liberation, while postmodern tradition rejects such narrative. The ambivalence of fundamental assumptions makes multicultural theory vulnerable to criticism. However, author maintains, this ambivalence can be a strength rather than a weakness of the multicultural theory. Using Mikhail Bakhtin's notion of polyphony, author attempts to show that incompatible theoretical perspectives may productively coexist within framework of dialogical (...)
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  17.  12
    Thomas Alexander (2002). Eros and Education: Postmodernism and the Dilemma of Humanist Pedagogy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (6):479-496.
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  18.  11
    Bas Levering (2001). There is No Education After Postmodernism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (5):423-432.
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  19.  4
    Leslie Cunliffe (forthcoming). After Late-and Postmodernism: A Wittgensteinian Reconstructive and Transformative Aesthetics, Art Practice, and Art Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
  20.  14
    Wilfred Carr (1995). Education and Democracy: Confronting the Postmodernist Challenge. Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):75–92.
  21.  18
    Paul Standish (1995). Postmodernism and the Education of the Whole Person. Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (1):121–135.
  22. Nicholas C. Burbules (2009). Postmodernism and Education. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press
     
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  23.  5
    Clive Beck (1995). Postmodernism, Ethics, and Moral Education. In Wendy Kohli (ed.), Critical Conversations in Philosophy of Education. Routledge 127--136.
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  24.  4
    Richard Smith (2010). Poststructuralism, Postmodernism and Education. In Richard Bailey (ed.), The Sage Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Sage Publication 139.
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  25. Clive Beck (1993). Postmodernism, Pedagogy, and Philosophy of Education. Philosophy of Education 27:1-13.
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  26.  4
    Carol Nicholson (1989). Postmodernism, Feminism, and Education: The Need for Solidarity. Educational Theory 39 (3):197-205.
  27.  20
    Julie Allan (2004). Deterritorializations: Putting Postmodernism to Work on Teacher Education and Inclusion. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (4):417–432.
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  28.  25
    Nicholas C. Burbules (2000). Postmodernism for Analytic Philosophers of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (3):311–314.
  29.  10
    Roger Paden (1987). Lyotard, Postmodernism, and the Crisis in Higher Education. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):53-58.
  30.  8
    Martin Bibby (2003). Fundamental Principles, Post-Postmodernism and Moral Education. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 11 (1):83-110.
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  31.  8
    Paul Hager & Michael Peters (2000). Symposium on Thinking Again: Education After Postmodernism by Nigel Blake, Richard Smith, Paul Standish & Paul Smeyers. Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (3):309–310.
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  32.  2
    Synthia Sydnor (2000). Critical Postmodernism in Human Movement, Physical Education and Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):108-110.
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  33.  1
    Barry Kanpol (1992). Postmodernism in Education Revisited: Similarities Within Differences and the Democratic Imaginary. Educational Theory 42 (2):217-229.
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  34.  7
    Paul Hager (1998). Lifelong Education: From Conflict to Consensus? [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):323-332.
    The concept of lifelong education received wide criticism and rejection in many educational circles in the 1970s. Recent developments in educational research and the increasing influence of postmodernist thought, the paper argues, are major factors in the return to favour of lifelong education. While a postmodern society is one characterised more by conflict than by consensus, the paper suggests that consensus on the importance of lifelong education might be one precondition for such a society.
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  35.  21
    Pradeep Ajit Dhillon & Paul Standish (eds.) (2000). Lyotard: Just Education. Routledge.
    Following Lyotard's death in 1998, this book provides an exploration of the recurrent theme of education in his work. It brings to a wider audience the significance of a body of thought about education that is subtle, profound and still largely unexplored. This book also makes an important contribution to contemporary debates on postmodernism and education.
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  36.  23
    G. N. Kitching (2008). The Trouble with Theory: The Educational Costs of Postmodernism. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "A critique of postmodernism and poststructuralism and an examination of their impact on higher education.
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  37.  9
    Michalinos Zembylas (2008). The Unbearable Lightness of Representing 'Reality' in Science Education: A Response to Schulz. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):494-514.
    This article responds to Schulz's criticisms of an earlier paper published in Educational Philosophy and Theory. The purpose in this paper is to clarify and extend some of my earlier arguments, to indicate what is unfortunate (i.e. what is lost) from a non-charitable, modernist reading of Lyotardian postmodernism (despite its weaknesses), and to suggest what new directions are emerging in science education from efforts to move beyond an either/or dichotomy of foundationalism and relativism.
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  38.  7
    Nigel Blake (1997). A Postmodernism Worth Bothering About: A Rejoinder to Cole, Hill and Rikowski. British Journal of Educational Studies 45 (3):293 - 305.
    This paper is a response to one published in the June 1997 edition of the BJES (Cole, Hill & Rikowski, 1997) which criticises the author's claims about the utility of postmodern analysis for studies in education (Blake, 1997).
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  39. Michael Peters (1999). Wittgenstein: Philosophy, Postmodernism, Pedagogy. Bergin & Garvey.
  40. Gunilla Dahlberg (1999). Beyond Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care: Postmodern Perspectives. Falmer Press.
    With places at nursery school promised for every child above the age of four, this book raises the stakes by looking at the quality of what is provided, and how that compares to what should be provided. Beyond Quality In Early Childhood Education and Care challenges received wisdom and the tendency to reduce philosophical issues of value to purely technical issues of measurement and management. In its place, it offers alternative ways of understanding early childhood, early childhood institutions and (...)
     
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  41.  26
    Gert Biesta & Denise Egéa-Kuehne (eds.) (2001). Derrida & Education. Routledge.
    Among educational theorists and philosophers there is growing interest in the work of Jacques Derrida and his philosophy of deconstruction. This important new book demonstrates how his work provides a highly relevant perspective on the aims, content and nature of education in contemporary, multicultural societies.
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  42.  17
    Andrew Wright (2004). Religion, Education, and Post-Modernity. Routledgefalmer.
    This book, the first to explore religious education and post-modernity in depth, sets out to provide a much needed examination of the problems and possibilities post-modernity raises for religious education.
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  43.  41
    Michael Peters (1995). Education and the Postmodern Condition: Revisiting Jean-François Lyotard. Journal of Philosophy of Education 29 (3):387–400.
  44.  3
    Denis Simard (2004). Education Et Herméneutique: Contribution à Une Pédagogie de la Culture. Distribution de Livres Univers.
    L'effritement du modèle rationaliste et humaniste de culture, des valeurs de progrès, d'éducation, de raison et d'humanité, constitue depuis une cinquantaine d'années le noyau de l'expérience culturelle occidentale.
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  45.  15
    Constantijn Koopman (2005). Music Education, Performativity and Aestheticization. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (1):119–131.
    This paper discusses the phenomena of performativity and aestheticization and their implications for education. The forces of performativity pose a threat to music and the other arts, even though some advocators try to justify music education by appealing to their alleged performative results. At first sight, aestheticization seems to accord much better with music education but closer analysis of this many‐sided phenomenon also yields negative points: superficiality often reigns, overfeeding leads to anaesthesia, and the aesthetic itself is (...)
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  46. Michael A. Peters, Valerie Allen, Ares D. Axiotis, Michael Bonnett, David E. Cooper, Patrick Fitzsimons, Ilan Gur-Ze'ev, Padraig Hogan, F. Ruth Irwin, Bert Lambeir, Paul Smeyers, Paul Standish & Iain Thomson (2002). Heidegger, Education, and Modernity. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Martin Heidegger is, perhaps, the most controversial philosopher of the twentieth-century. Little has been written on him or about his work and its significance for educational thought. This unique collection by a group of international scholars reexamines Heidegger's work and its legacy for educational thought.
     
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  47. James Marshall (1996). Michel Foucault Personal Autonomy and Education.
     
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  48. Stuart Parker (1997). Reflective Teaching in the Postmodern World: A Manifesto for Education in Postmodernity. Open University Press.
     
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  49. Michael Peters (ed.) (1998). Naming the Multiple: Poststructuralism and Education. Bergin & Garvey.
  50.  16
    David Carr (ed.) (1998). Education, Knowledge, and Truth: Beyond the Postmodern Impasse. Routledge.
    Seeking to reinstate the importance of knowledge, truth and curriculum in contemporary intellectual debate, this book fills a major gap in the literature and greatly advances an exciting area of research.
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