Search results for 'Power (Social sciences History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Harold Eugene Davis (1983). History and Power: The Social Relevance of History. Upa.
    To find out more information about Rowman & Littlefield titles please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
     
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  2.  17
    Gert Buelens (ed.) (1997). Enacting History in Henry James: Narrative, Power, and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    The Jamesian mode of writing, it has been claimed, actively works against an understanding of the way truth, history and power circulate in his texts. In this collection of essays, leading scholars of James analyse the strategies James used to address these crucial issues. Enacting History in Henry James claims that, because the type of knowledge available in James's fiction is never of a cognitive kind, the reader can never know 'truth' in any verifiable sense. James's writing (...)
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  3.  4
    Simon Szreter (2002). The State of Social Capital: Bringing Back in Power, Politics, and History. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 31 (5):573-621.
  4.  2
    C. Chimisso (2005). Constructing Narratives and Reading Texts: Approaches to History and Power Struggles Between Philosophy and Emergent Disciplines in Inter-War France. History of the Human Sciences 18 (3):83-107.
    In inter-war France, history of philosophy was a very important academic discipline, but nevertheless its practitioners thought it necessary to defend its identity, which was threatened by its vicinity to many other disciplines, and especially by the emergent social sciences and history of science. I shall focus on two particular issues that divided traditional historians of philosophy from historians of science, ethnologists and sociologists, and that became crucial in the definition of the identity of their disciplines: the (...)
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  5. Michel Foucault (2003). Abnormal: Lectures at the Collège De France, 1974-1975. Picador.
    The second volume in an unprecedented publishing event: the complete College de France lectures of one of the most influential thinkers of the last century Michel Foucault remains among the towering intellectual figures of postmodern philosophy. His works on sexuality, madness, the prison, and medicine are classics his example continues to challenge and inspire. From 1971 until his death in 1984, Foucault gave public lectures at the world-famous College de France. These lectures were seminal events. Attended by thousands, they created (...)
     
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  6. Ettore A. Albertoni (1987). Mosca and the Theory of Elitism. B. Blackwell.
     
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  7.  6
    Hartvig Frisch (1949/1976). Might and Right in Antiquity. Arno Press.
    MIGHT AND RIGHT IN ANTIQUITY BY HARTVIG FRISCH TRANSLATED BY CC MARTINDALE "DIKE " I FROM HOMER TO THE PERSIAN WARS GYLDENDALSKE BOGHANDEL ...
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  8.  1
    Nick Smith (1993). Social Power and the Domination of Nature. History of the Human Sciences 6 (3):101-110.
    Axel Honneth, The Critique of Power: Reflective Stages in a Critical Social Theory, translated by Kenneth Baynes. Cambridge, MA and London: MIT Press, 1991. £24.75, xxxii + 340 pp., 0 262 08202 0.
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  9.  9
    Rolf Gruner (1977). Theory and Power: On the Character of Modern Sciences. B. R. Grüner.
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  10. Michel Foucault (2007). Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the Collège De France, 1977-1978. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Marking a major development in Foucault's thinking, this book derives from the lecture course which he gave at the Collège de France between January and April, 1978. Taking as his starting point the notion of "bio-power," introduced in his 1976 course Society Must be Defended , Foucault sets out to study the foundations of this new technology of power over population. Distinct from punitive, disciplinary systems, the mechanisms of power are here finely entwined with the technologies of (...)
     
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  11.  9
    Scott Vrecko (2010). Neuroscience, Power and Culture: An Introduction. History of the Human Sciences 23 (1):1-10.
    In line with their vast expansion over the last few decades, the brain sciences — including neurobiology, psychopharmacology, biological psychiatry, and brain imaging — are becoming increasingly prominent in a variety of cultural formations, from self-help guides and the arts to advertising and public health programmes. This article, which introduces the special issue of History of the Human Science on ‘Neuroscience, Power and Culture’, considers the ways that social and historical research can, through empirical investigations grounded in (...)
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  12.  5
    Rick Tilman (2002). Emile Durkheim and Thorstein Veblen on Epistemology, Cultural Lag and Social Order. History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):51-70.
    Despite their importance to the history of economics and social theory, social scientists and historians pay little heed to the structural similarities as well as the important divergences in the work of French-man Emile Durkheim (1858—1917) and American Thorstein Veblen (1857—1929). Consequently, this article places Durkheim and Veblen in their social and historical context, and then (1) their epistemologies are related to their use of cultural lag to explain the persistence of atavistic continuities in the existing order, (2) their (...)
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  13. Derek Layder (1994). Reviews : Franco Crespi, Social Action and Power. Oxford: Blackwell, 1992. £35.00, Paper £11.95, X + 147pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 7 (3):111-113.
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  14. Michel Foucault (2007). Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1977-78. République Française.
    Marking a major development in Foucault's thinking, this book derives from the lecture course which he gave at the Collège de France between January and April, 1978. Taking as his starting point the notion of "bio-power," introduced in his 1976 course Society Must be Defended , Foucault sets out to study the foundations of this new technology of power over population. Distinct from punitive, disciplinary systems, the mechanisms of power are here finely entwined with the technologies of (...)
     
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  15.  56
    Peter Mittelstaedt (2009). Hernán Pringe: Critique of the Quantum Power of Judgement. A Transcendental Foundation of Quantum Objectivity. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (1):149-154.
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  16. F. Crespi (1994). Social Action and Power (Derek Layder). History of the Human Sciences 7:111-111.
     
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  17.  4
    Richard Peter McKeon (1990). Freedom and History and Other Essays: An Introduction to the Thought of Richard Mckeon. University of Chicago Press.
    This volume of essays is an important introduction to the thought of one of the twentieth century's most significant yet underappreciated philosophers, Richard McKeon. The originator of philosophical pluralism, McKeon made extraordinary contributions to philosophy, to international relations, and to theory-formation in the communication arts, aesthetics, the organization of knowledge, and the practical sciences. This collection, which includes a philosophical autobiography as well as the out-of-print title essay "Freedom and History" and a previously unpublished essay on "Philosophic Semantics (...)
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  18.  3
    Fred Weinstein (1990). History and Theory After the Fall: An Essay on Interpretation. University of Chicago Press.
    In this ambitious work, Fred Weinstein confronts the obstacles that have increasingly frustrated our attempts to explain social and historical reality. Traditionally, we have relied on history and social theory to describe the ways people understand the world they live in. But the ordering explanations we have always used--derived from the classical social theories originally forged by Marx, Tocqueville, Weber, Durkheim, Freud--have collapsed. In the wake of this collapse or "fall," the rival claims of fiction, psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, and (...)
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  19.  2
    James D. Faubion (ed.) (1995). Rethinking the Subject: An Anthology of Contemporary European Social Thought. Westview Press.
    Since the early 1970s, European thinkers have departed notably from their predecessors in order to pursue analytical programs more thoroughly their own. Rethinking the Subject brings together in one volume some of the most influential writings of Foucault, Habermas, Bourdieu, Pizzorno, Macfarlane, and other authors whose ideas have had a worldwide influence in recent social history.The anthology is testament to the central importance of three contemporary themes, each familiar to earlier thinkers but never definitively formulated or resolved. The first (...)
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  20.  69
    Michel Foucault (1972/2002). Archaeology of Knowledge. Routledge.
    "Next to Sartre's Search for a Method and in direct opposition to it, Foucault's work is the most noteworthy effort at a theory of history in the last 50 years." -- Library Journal.
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  21. Eric R. Wolf (1999). Envisioning Power: Ideologies of Dominance and Crisis. University of California Press.
    With the originality and energy that have marked his earlier works, Eric Wolf now explores the historical relationship of ideas, power, and culture. Responding to anthropology's long reliance on a concept of culture that takes little account of power, Wolf argues that power is crucial in shaping the circumstances of cultural production. Responding to social-science notions of ideology that incorporate power but disregard the ways ideas respond to cultural promptings, he demonstrates how power and ideas (...)
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  22. M. Featherstone (2009). Occidentalism: Jack Goody and Comparative History: Introduction. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (7-8):1-15.
    This article introduces the special section on the contribution of Jack Goody, which focuses on The Theft of History . Goody attacks the notion of a radical division between Europe and Asia, which has become built into the commonsense academic wisdom and categorical apparatus of the social sciences and humanities. Eurocentrism is a constant target as he scrutinizes and finds wanting the claims of the West to have invented modern science, cultural renaissances, the free city, capitalism, democracy, love (...)
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  23. Zahava K. Mckeon & Howard Ruttenberg (1991). Freedom and History and Other Essays: An Introduction to the Thought of Richard McKeon. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 27 (1):135-140.
    This volume of essays is an important introduction to the thought of one of the twentieth century's most significant yet underappreciated philosophers, Richard McKeon. The originator of philosophical pluralism, McKeon made extraordinary contributions to philosophy, to international relations, and to theory-formation in the communication arts, aesthetics, the organization of knowledge, and the practical sciences. This collection, which includes a philosophical autobiography as well as the out-of-print title essay "Freedom and History" and a previously unpublished essay on "Philosophic Semantics (...)
     
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  24. Eric Dunning & Stephen Mennell (eds.) (2003). Norbert Elias. Sage.
    Norbert Elias (1897-1990) is now widely regarded as one of the greatest sociologists of the 20th century. The challenge and profundity of his work are still being assimilated. Some have suggested that in time, he will be regarded as the Copernicus or Darwin of sociology, the man who set the subject on its scientific course. These four volumes provide a comprehensive and penetrating survey of Elias's life and work. They pinpoint the main fields of research which Elias and his followers (...)
     
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  25.  8
    Dorinda Outram (1986). Uncertain Legislator: Georges Cuvier's Laws of Nature in Their Intellectual Context. Journal of the History of Biology 19 (3):323 - 368.
    We should now be able to come to some general conclusions about the main lines of Cuvier's development as a naturalist after his departure from Normandy. We have seen that Cuvier arrived in Paris aware of the importance of physiology in classification, yet without a fully worked out idea of how such an approach could organize a whole natural order. He was freshly receptive to the ideas of the new physiology developed by Xavier Bichat.Cuvier arrived in a Paris also torn (...)
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  26.  2
    Steindór J. Erlingsson (2002). From Haeckelian Monist to Anti-Haeckelian Vitalist: The Transformation of the Icelandic Naturalist Thorvaldur Thoroddsen (1855-1921). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):443 - 470.
    Iceland has not been known as a contributor to the history of science. This small nation in the North-Atlantic has only in recent decades made its mark on international science. But the Icelandic naturalist Thorvaldur Thoroddsen (1855-1921) is an exception to this generalisation, for he was well known at the turn of the 20th century in Europe and America for his research on the geography and geology of Iceland. Though Thoroddsen's contribution to these sciences is of great interest (...)
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  27.  9
    Clare O'Farrell (2005). Michel Foucault. Sage Publications.
    "Clare O'Farrell is to be congratulated on producing a truly magnificent book on the work of Michel Foucault. There are details, insights and observations that will engage the specialist and there is an extensive documentation of Foucault's output. If there is a more comprehensive book on Foucault's work I have yet to see it. I anticipate those teaching and taking courses on Foucault's work will find Clare O'Farrell's book to be an invaluable resource'" - Barry Smart, University of Portsmouth "Dr. (...)
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  28.  32
    Gary Gutting (ed.) (2006). The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge University Press.
    For Michel Foucault, philosophy was a way of questioning the allegedly necessary truths that underpin the practices and institutions of modern society. He carried this out in a series of deeply original and strikingly controversial studies on the origins of modern medical and social scientific disciplines. These studies have raised fundamental questions about the nature of human knowledge and its relation to power structures, and have become major topics of discussion throughout the humanities and social sciences. The essays (...)
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  29.  44
    Machiel Keestra, How Do Narratives and Brains Mutually Influence Each Other? Taking Both the ‘Neuroscientific Turn’ and the ‘Narrative Turn’ in Explaining Bio-Political Orders.
    The observation that brains and political orders are interdependent is almost trivial. Obviously, political orders require brain processes in order to emerge and to remain in place, as these processes enable action and cognition. Conversely, ever since Aristotle coined man as “by nature a political animal” (Aristotle, Pol.: 1252a 3; cf. Eth. Nic.: 1097b 11), this also suggests that the political engagements of this animal has likely consequences for its natural development, including the development of its psychological functions. Given these (...)
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  30.  17
    Patrick Brantlinger (1985). Victorians and Africans: The Genealogy of the Myth of the Dark Continent. Critical Inquiry 12 (1):166-203.
    Paradoxically, abolitionism contained the seeds of empire. If we accept the general outline of Eric Williams’ thesis in Capitalism and Slavery that abolition was not purely altruistic but was as economically conditioned as Britain’s later empire building in Africa, the contradiction between the ideologies of antislavery and imperialism seems more apparent than real. Although the idealism that motivated the great abolitionists such as William Wilberforce and Thomas Clarkson is unquestionable, Williams argues that Britain could afford to legislate against the slave (...)
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  31.  33
    Björn Eriksson (2005). Understanding Narrative Explanation. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):317-344.
    The paper describes and defends an eclectic approach to narrative explanation in history and social sciences (as well as in natural history). The view of narrative explanation defended allows combinations of several recent ideas concerning the nature of narrative explanation.The guiding idea is that the explanatory power of narratives consists in their capacity to accommodate various forms of explanations and interpretations. Narrative explanations are seen as theories abouthappenings that may consist of diverse forms of explanations, interpretations (...)
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  32.  31
    Jonathan Wolff, Karl Marx. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Karl Marx (1818-1883) is best known not as a philosopher but as a revolutionary communist, whose works inspired the foundation of many communist regimes in the twentieth century. It is hard to think of many who have had as much influence in the creation of the modern world. Trained as a philosopher, Marx turned away from philosophy in his mid-twenties, towards economics and politics. However, in addition to his overtly philosophical early work, his later writings have many points of contact (...)
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  33.  2
    Imre Levai (1998). Calm Before the Storm: Some Current Issues of Global Political Economy. World Futures 51 (3):321-332.
    The year 1996 was regarded by a considerable part of contemporary literature on global political economy as a definite turning point in modern history. The majority of experts tended to see the starting point of take‐off that year, but others—not a negligible minority—saw omens of disastrous recession and lasting depression. It appears the time has not yet come. The question is now that of the incalculable resultant of runaway (deregulated) forces of the international financial “whirlpool”, of a random process (...)
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  34. Lisa Downing (2008). The Cambridge Introduction to Michel Foucault. Cambridge University Press.
    French philosopher and historian Michel Foucault is essential reading for students in departments of literature, history, sociology and cultural studies. His work on the institutions of mental health and medicine, the history of systems of knowledge, literature and literary theory, criminality and the prison system, and sexuality, has had a profound and enduring impact across the humanities and social sciences. This introductory book, written for students, offers in-depth critical and contextual perspectives on all of Foucault's major published (...)
     
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  35. Reidar Andreas Due (2007). Deleuze. Polity.
    This book provides a clear and concise introduction to the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. It analyses his key theoretical concepts, such as difference and the body without organs, and covers all the different areas of his thought, including metaphysics, the history of philosophy, psychoanalysis, political theory, the philosophy of the social sciences and aesthetics. As the first book to offer a comprehensive analysis of Deleuze's writings, it reveals both the internal coherence of his philosophy and its development through (...)
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  36. Reidar Andreas Due (2007). Deleuze. Polity.
    This book provides a clear and concise introduction to the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. It analyses his key theoretical concepts, such as difference and the body without organs, and covers all the different areas of his thought, including metaphysics, the history of philosophy, psychoanalysis, political theory, the philosophy of the social sciences and aesthetics. As the first book to offer a comprehensive analysis of Deleuze's writings, it reveals both the internal coherence of his philosophy and its development through (...)
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  37. Gary Gutting (ed.) (2005). The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge University Press.
    For Michel Foucault, philosophy was a way of questioning the allegedly necessary truths that underpin the practices and institutions of modern society. He carried this out in a series of deeply original and strikingly controversial studies on the origins of modern medical and social scientific disciplines. These studies have raised fundamental questions about the nature of human knowledge and its relation to power structures, and have become major topics of discussion throughout the humanities and social sciences. The essays (...)
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  38. Gary Gutting (ed.) (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Foucault. Cambridge University Press.
    Each volume of this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. Michel Foucault, one of the most important of contemporary French thinkers, exerted a profound influence on philosophy, history, and (...)
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  39. David M. Kaplan (1998). Discourse and Critique in the Hermeneutic Phenomenology of Paul Ricoeur. Dissertation, Fordham University
    This work traces the development Paul Ricoeur's recent hermeneutic phenomenology since the late 1960's, and develops the critical element within Ricoeur's recent thought by examining his conceptions of ideology and utopia, and the relationship between hermeneutics and critical theory, in order to elaborate a critical and rationally justified interpretation of human action for the social sciences. Particular attention is paid to Ricoeur's works on metaphor, narrative, and ethics in the context of a critical theory of power, ideology and (...)
     
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  40. Charles R. Varela (2009). Science for Humanism: The Recovery of Human Agency. Routledge.
    In the 18th century, the pre-modern Judeo-Greco-Christian problem of freedom and determinism is transformed by Kant into the modern problem of the freedom of human agency in the natural and cultural worlds of deterministic structures; it is this version of the freedom and determinism issue which centres the Science and Humanism debates, and thus marks the history of the social sciences. Anthony Giddens is credited with providing the new vocabulary of ‘structure’ and ‘agency’ in order to formulate the (...)
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  41.  34
    Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.
    continent. 1.1 : 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has followed, (...)
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  42.  32
    John Cartwright (2010). Naturalising Ethics: The Implications of Darwinism for the Study of Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Science and Education 19 (4-5):407-443.
    The nature of moral values has occupied philosophers and educationalists for centuries and a variety of claims have been made about their origin and status. One tradition suggests they may be thoughts in the mind of God; another that they are eternal truths to be reached by rational reflection (much like the truths of mathematics) or alternatively through intuition; another that they are social conventions; and another (from the logical positivists) that they are not verifiable facts but simply the expression (...)
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  43.  18
    Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida (...)
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  44. John D. Caputo & Mark Yount (eds.) (1993). Foucault and the Critique of Institutions. Penn State University Press.
    The issue of the institution is not addressed systematically anywhere in the literature on Foucault, although it is everywhere to be found in Foucault's writings._ Foucault and the Critique of Institutions_ not only interprets the work of Foucault but also applies it to the question of the institution. Foucault is a master at analyzing the web of social relations that effectively shape the modern individual. While these social relations are smaller and finer than institutions, institutions are, by Foucault's account, saturated (...)
     
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  45.  1
    Bruce H. Jennings (1997). The Killing Fields: Science and Politics at Berkeley, California, USA. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):259-271.
    Over the past several decades, a group of scholars at the Berkeley campus of the University of California have frequently challenged many of the dominant themes of contemporary agricultural research. In their work, they have organized curricula questioning the assumptions of conventional agriculture and its sciences while encouraging the development of alternative agricultural practices based on principles of ecology. Their collective critique has stimulated an intellectual climate calling forth a scrutiny of the university's role in the production of knowledge (...)
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  46.  21
    Peter Taylor (2010). Three Puzzles and Eight Gaps: What Heritability Studies and Critical Commentaries Have Not Paid Enough Attention To. Biology and Philosophy 25 (1):1-31.
    This article examines eight “gaps” in order to clarify why the quantitative genetics methods of partitioning variation of a trait into heritability and other components has very limited power to show anything clear and useful about genetic and environmental influences, especially for human behaviors and other traits. The first two gaps should be kept open; the others should be bridged or the difficulty of doing so should be acknowledged: 1. Key terms have multiple meanings that are distinct; 2. Statistical (...)
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  47.  1
    Elisabeth Nemeth (1994). Empiricism and the Norms of Scientific Knowledge: Some Reflections on Otto Neurath and Pierre Bourdieu. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 2:23-32.
    In this paper I would like to discuss some normative aspects of Otto Neurath’s concept of scientific knowledge. I will take some reflections of Pierre Bourdieu, a sociologist known for his harsh criticism of “philosophers” as a point of reference. I have decided to employ his “non-philosophical” perspective because of its convergence with the very tradition to which the Institute Vienna Circle has aligned itself. That tradition derived the form and power of its beginnings from the unbiased attitude, the (...)
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  48. Chiara Bottici & Benoît Challand (eds.) (2011). The Politics of Imagination. Birkbeck Law Press.
    _The Politics of Imagination_ offers a multidisciplinary perspective on the contemporary relationship between politics and the imagination. What role does our capacity to form images play in politics? And can we define politics as a struggle for people’s imagination? As a result of the increasingly central place of the media in our lives, the political role of imagination has undergone a massive quantitative and a qualitative change. As such, there has been a revival of interest in the concept of imagination, (...)
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  49. John D. Caputo & Mark Yount (eds.) (2006). Foucault and the Critique of Institutions. Penn State University Press.
    The issue of the institution is not addressed systematically anywhere in the literature on Foucault, although it is everywhere to be found in Foucault's writings._ Foucault and the Critique of Institutions_ not only interprets the work of Foucault but also applies it to the question of the institution. Foucault is a master at analyzing the web of social relations that effectively shape the modern individual. While these social relations are smaller and finer than institutions, institutions are, by Foucault's account, saturated (...)
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  50. Matt Ffytche & Daniel Pick (eds.) (2016). Psychoanalysis in the Age of Totalitarianism. Routledge.
    _Psychoanalysis in the Age of Totalitarianism_ provides rich new insights into the history of political thought and clinical knowledge. In these chapters, internationally renowned historians and cultural theorists discuss landmark debates about the uses and abuses of ‘the talking cure’ and map the diverse psychologies and therapeutic practices that have featured in and against tyrannical, modern regimes. These essays show both how the Freudian movement responded to and was transformed by the rise of fascism and communism, the Second World (...)
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