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Madison Powers [25]Thomas M. Powers [17]Lawrence H. Powers [14]John Powers [14]
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See also:
Profile: Thomas M. Powers (University of Delaware)
Profile: John Powers (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)
Profile: John Powers (Australian National University)
Profile: Cole Powers (McGill University)
Profile: Carol Powers (Harvard University)
Profile: E. Willard Powers
Profile: Louis Powers (Malone College)
Profile: Lisa Powers
Profile: Talon Powers (Macalester College)
Profile: Tyler Powers (Alabama State University)
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  1. William T. Powers (1973). Behavior: The Control of Perception. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2.  50
    Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2008). Social Justice: The Moral Foundations of Public Health and Health Policy. OUP Usa.
    In bioethics, discussions of justice have tended to focus on questions of fairness in access to health care: is there a right to medical treatment, and how should priorities be set when medical resources are scarce. But health care is only one of many factors that determine the extent to which people live healthy lives, and fairness is not the only consideration in determining whether a health policy is just. In this pathbreaking book, senior bioethicists Powers and Faden confront foundational (...)
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  3. Madison Powers, Ruth Faden & Yashar Saghai (2012). Liberty, Mill and the Framework of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):6-15.
    In this article, we address the relevance of J.S. Mill’s political philosophy for a framework of public health ethics. In contrast to some readings of Mill, we reject the view that in the formulation of public policies liberties of all kinds enjoy an equal presumption in their favor. We argue that Mill also rejects this view and discuss the distinction that Mill makes between three kinds of liberty interests: interests that are immune from state interference; interests that enjoy a presumption (...)
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  4. Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2013). Social Practices, Public Health and the Twin Aims of Justice: Responses to Comments. Public Health Ethics 6 (1):45-49.
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  5. H. H. Powers (1900). The Ethics of Expansion. International Journal of Ethics 10 (3):288-306.
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  6. Thomas M. Powers (2006). Prospects for a Kantian Machine. IEEE Intelligent Systems 21 (4):46-51.
    This paper is reprinted in the book Machine Ethics, eds. M. Anderson and S. Anderson, Cambridge University Press, 2011.
     
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  7.  37
    Thomas M. Powers (2004). Real Wrongs in Virtual Communities. Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):191-198.
    Beginning with the well-knowncyber-rape in LambdaMOO, I argue that it ispossible to have real moral wrongs in virtualcommunities. I then generalize the account toshow how it applies to interactions in gamingand discussion communities. My account issupported by a view of moral realism thatacknowledges entities like intentions andcausal properties of actions. Austin's speechact theory is used to show that real people canact in virtual communities in ways that bothestablish practices and moral expectations, andwarrant strong identifications betweenthemselves and their online identities. Rawls'conception (...)
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  8.  49
    Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2005). Computer Systems and Responsibility: A Normative Look at Technological Complexity. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):99-107.
    In this paper, we focus attention on the role of computer system complexity in ascribing responsibility. We begin by introducing the notion of technological moral action (TMA). TMA is carried out by the combination of a computer system user, a system designer (developers, programmers, and testers), and a computer system (hardware and software). We discuss three sometimes overlapping types of responsibility: causal responsibility, moral responsibility, and role responsibility. Our analysis is informed by the well-known accounts provided by Hart and Hart (...)
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  9.  14
    Joachim W. Marz, Thomas L. Powers & Thomas Queisser (2003). Corporate and Individual Influences on Managers' Social Orientation. Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):1 - 11.
    This paper reports research on the influence of corporate and individual characteristics on managers'' social orientation in Germany. The results indicate that mid-level managers expressed a significantly lower social orientation than low-level managers, and that job activity did not impact social orientation. Female respondents expressed a higher social orientation than male respondents. No impact of the political system origin (former East Germany versus former West Germany) on social orientation was shown. Overall, corporate position had a significantly higher impact on social (...)
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  10.  2
    Penny Powers (1996). Discourse Analysis as a Methodology for Nursing Inquiry. Nursing Inquiry 3 (4):207-217.
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  11.  46
    Madison Powers (2001). Justice in the Genetic Age. Hastings Center Report 31 (5):47-48.
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  12.  1
    Dennis J. Burns & Richard B. Powers (1975). Choice and Self-Control in Children: A Test of Rachlin’s Model. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (2):156-158.
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  13. John Powers & Deane Curtin (1994). Mothering: Moral Cultivation in Buddhist and Feminist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 44 (1):1-18.
  14.  9
    Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2008). Computers as Surrogate Agents. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 251.
  15.  36
    Penny Powers (2007). Persuasion and Coercion: A Critical Review of Philosophical and Empirical Approaches. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 19 (2):125-143.
  16.  19
    Madison Powers (2005). Bioethics as Politics: The Limits of Moral Expertise. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (3):305-322.
    : The increasing reliance upon, and perhaps the growing public and professional skepticism about, the special expertise of bioethicists suggests the need to consider the limits of moral expertise. For all the talk about method in bioethics, we, bioethicists, are still rather far off the mark in understanding what we are doing, even when we may be going about what we are doing fairly well. Quite often, what is most fundamentally at stake, but equally often insufficiently acknowledged, are inherently political, (...)
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  17. Thomas M. Powers (2011). Incremental Machine Ethics. IEEE Robotics and Automation 18 (1):51-58.
  18.  19
    Marshall Battani, David R. Hall & Rosemary Powers (1997). Cultures' Structures: Making Meaning in the Public Sphere. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 26 (6):781-812.
  19.  16
    Sally I. Powers (1988). Moral Judgement Development Within the Family. Journal of Moral Education 17 (3):209-219.
    Abstract This paper examines research and theory regarding the process of moral judgement development within the family environment. Four major issues in research on the family's influence on moral judgement development are outlined and the existing data relevant to these issues are briefly presented. The author's approach to studying these issues is described. The implications of research on moral development within the family for moral education are also addressed.
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  20.  43
    Madison Powers & Ruth R. Faden (2000). Inequalities in Health, Inequalities in Health Care: Four Generations of Discussion About Justice and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 10 (2):109-127.
    : The focus of questions of justice in health policy has shifted during the last 20 years, beginning with questions about rights to health care, and then, by the late 1980s, turning to issues of rationing. More recently, attention has focused on alternatives to cost-effectiveness analysis. In addition, health inequalities, and not just inequalities in access to health care, have become the subject of moral analysis. This article examines how such trends have transformed the philosophical landscape and encouraged some in (...)
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  21.  42
    Madison Powers (1991). Justice and the Market for Health Insurance. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (4):307-323.
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  22.  6
    P. A. Ryan, S. T. Powers & R. A. Watson (2016). Social Niche Construction and Evolutionary Transitions in Individuality. Biology and Philosophy 31 (1):59-79.
    Social evolution theory conventionally takes an externalist explanatory stance, treating observed cooperation as explanandum and the positive assortment of cooperative behaviour as explanans. We ask how the circumstances bringing about this positive assortment arose in the first place. Rather than merely push the explanatory problem back a step, we move from an externalist to an interactionist explanatory stance, in the spirit of Lewontin and the Niche Construction theorists. We develop a theory of ‘social niche construction’ in which we consider biological (...)
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  23.  35
    Lawrence H. Powers (1978). Knowledge by Deduction. Philosophical Review 87 (3):337-371.
  24.  18
    Jessica Powers (1940). New Zealand Poems. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (4):737-738.
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  25.  14
    C. John Powers (2000). Buddhism and Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):207-210.
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  26.  14
    J. F. Powers (1949). Why Do I Write? By Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene, V. S. Pritchett. Renascence 2 (2):168-171.
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  27.  21
    Ruth Faden & Madison Powers (2011). A Social Justice Framework for Health and Science Policy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (04):596-604.
    The goal of this article is to explore how a social justice framework can help illuminate the role that consent should play in health and science policy. In the first section, we set the stage for our inquiry with the important case of Henrietta Lacks. Without her knowledge or consent, or that of her family, Mrs. Lacks’s cells gave rise to an enormous advance in biomedical science—the first immortal human cell line, or HeLa cells.
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  28.  4
    William T. Powers (1986). Intentionality: No Mystery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):152.
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  29.  14
    Jessica Powers (1940). The Spiritual Aspects of the New Poetry. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):529-530.
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  30.  7
    Carol L. Powers & Paul C. McLean (2011). The Community Speaks: Continuous Deep Sedation as Caregiving Versus Physician-Assisted Suicide as Killing. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):65 - 66.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 65-66, June 2011.
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  31.  25
    William Powers (1995). The Origins of Purpose: The First Metasystem Transitions. World Futures 45 (1):125-137.
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  32.  24
    Jessica Powers (1941). Make Bright the Arrows. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):374-375.
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  33.  20
    Ruth Faden & Madison Powers (2013). Biotechnology, Justice and Health. Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (1):49-61.
    New biotechnologies have the potential to both dramatically improve human well-being and dramatically widen inequalities in well-being. This paper addresses a question that lies squarely on the fault line of these two claims: When as a matter of justice are societies obligated to include a new biotechnology in a national healthcare system? This question is approached from the standpoint of a twin aim theory of justice, in which social structures, including nation-states, have double-barreled theoretical objectives with regard to human well-being. (...)
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  34. Thomas M. Powers (2005). Deontological Machine Ethics. In M. Anderson, S. L. Anderson & C. Armen (eds.), Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Fall Symposium Technical Report.
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  35.  21
    Douglas Powers (1930). Francis and Freud. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (4):624-637.
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  36.  7
    Lawrence H. Powers (1995). The One Fallacy Theory. Informal Logic 17 (2).
    My One Fallacy theory says there is only one fallacy: equivocation, or playing on an ambiguity. In this paper I explain how this theory arose from rnetaphilosophical concerns. And I contrast this theory with purely logical, dialectical, and psychological notions of fallacy.
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  37.  10
    Douglas Powers (1933). Il Padre Eusebio Chini. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):329-331.
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  38.  10
    J. F. Powers (1949). Why Do I Write? By Elizabeth Bowen, Graham Greene, V. S. Pritchett. Renascence 2 (2):168-171.
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  39.  19
    John C. Powers (2014). Victor D. Boantza Matter and Method in the Long Chemical Revolution: Laws of Another Order , Pp. Xvi + 264 , £ 70.00, ISBN 13: 978 1 4094 1867 2. [REVIEW] Early Science and Medicine 19 (2):208-210.
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  40. Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2009). Ethics and Technology: A Program for Future Research. In M. Winston and R. Edelbach (ed.), Society, Ethics, and Technology, 4th edition.
    This chapter is reprinted from our lead essay in the Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics, ed. C. Mitcham, Gale, 2005.
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  41.  2
    Margaret A. Boden & William T. Powers (1975). Purposive Explanation in Psychology. Philosophy of Science 42 (1):103-106.
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  42. David S. Powers (1990). Fatwas as Sources for Legal and Social History: A Dispute Over Endowment Revenues From Fourteenth-Century Fez. Al-Qantara: Revista de Estudios Árabes 11 (2):295-342.
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  43.  17
    Keith D. Warner, Kent M. Daane, Christina M. Getz, Stephen P. Maurano, Sandra Calderon & Kathleen A. Powers (2011). The Decline of Public Interest Agricultural Science and the Dubious Future of Crop Biological Control in California. Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):483-496.
    Drawing from a four-year study of US science institutions that support biological control of arthropods, this article examines the decline in biological control institutional capacity in California within the context of both declining public interest science and declining agricultural research activism. After explaining how debates over the public interest character of biological control science have shaped institutions in California, we use scientometric methods to assess the present status and trends in biological control programs within both the University of California Land (...)
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  44.  28
    Thomas M. Powers (2013). On the Moral Agency of Computers. Topoi 32 (2):227-236.
    Can computer systems ever be considered moral agents? This paper considers two factors that are explored in the recent philosophical literature. First, there are the important domains in which computers are allowed to act, made possible by their greater functional capacities. Second, there is the claim that these functional capacities appear to embody relevant human abilities, such as autonomy and responsibility. I argue that neither the first (Doman-Function) factor nor the second (Simulacrum) factor gets at the central issue in the (...)
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  45. John Powers (1991). The Yogacara School of Buddhism: A Bibliography. Scarecrow Press.
    A comprehensive guide to scriptural sources and authors, translations and critical editions of texts, and books and articles on Yogacara and related topics.
     
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  46. Thomas M. Powers (2008). Environmental Holism and Nanotechnology. In F. Allhoff & P. Lin (eds.), Nanotechnology and Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues. Springer
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  47.  8
    James F. Powers (1978). A History of the Crusades. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):104-105.
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  48.  61
    Madison Powers (1996). Forget About Equality. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (2):129-144.
    : Justice is widely thought to consist in equality. For many theorists, the central question has been: Equality of what? The author argues that the ideal of equality distorts practical reasoning and has deeply counterintuitive implications. Moreover, an alternative view of distributive justice can give a better account of what egalitarians should care about than can any of the competing ideals of equality.
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  49.  15
    Elizabeth Powers (2008). " Interrogation of the Past": Henry James and William Wetmore Story. Arion 16 (2):51-70.
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  50.  9
    Richard Eduard Leibbrandt & D. M. Powers (2010). Frequent Frames as Cues to Part-of-Speech in Dutch: Why Filler Frequency Matters. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
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