Search results for 'Practice of law Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Steven Keeva (2009). Transforming Practices: Finding Joy and Satisfaction in the Legal Life. American Bar Association.score: 1374.0
    Steven Keeva's "Transforming Practices" Is Changing Lives "Every lawyer and law student in America [should] read this book, study it, savor it, and make it a ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.score: 1194.0
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 1116.0
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in almost two decades, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jens Timmermann (2007). Simplicity and Authority: Reflections on Theory and Practice in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):167-182.score: 1100.0
    What is the proper task of Kantian ethical theory? This paper seeks to answer this question with reference to Kant's reply to Christian Garve in Section I of his 1793 essay on Theory and Practice . Kant reasserts the distinctness and natural authority of our consciousness of the moral law. Every mature human being is a moral professional—even philosophers like Garve, if only they forget about their ill-conceived ethical systems and listen to the voice of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ruth C. A. Higgins (2004). The Moral Limits of Law: Obedience, Respect, and Legitimacy. Oxford University Press.score: 1050.0
    The Moral Limits of Law analyzes the related debates concerning the moral obligation to obey the law, conscientious citizenship, and state legitimacy. Modern societies are drawn in a tension between the centripetal pull of the local and the centrifugal stress of the global. Boundaries that once appeared permanent are now permeable: transnational legal, economic, and trade institutions increasingly erode the autonomy of states. Nonetheless transnational principles are still typically effected through state law. For law's subjects, this tension brings (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Matthew H. Kramer (2007). Objectivity and the Rule of Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 1025.0
    What is objectivity? What is the rule of law? Are the operations of legal systems objective? If so, in what ways and to what degrees are they objective? Does anything of importance depend on the objectivity of law? These are some of the principal questions addressed by Matthew H. Kramer in this lucid and wide-ranging study that introduces readers to vital areas of philosophical enquiry.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Samuel Mejías Valbuena (2005). Philosophical, Scientist, Moral, Ethics and Religious Analysis in the Juridical Compared Science in the Law of Cloning. S. Mejías Valbuena.score: 1005.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. G. T. Laurie (2002). Genetic Privacy: A Challenge to Medico-Legal Norms. Cambridge University Press.score: 998.7
    The phenomenon of the New Genetics raises complex social problems, particularly those of privacy. This book offers ethical and legal perspectives on the questions of a right to know and not to know genetic information from the standpoint of individuals, their relatives, employers, insurers and the state. Graeme Laurie provides a unique definition of privacy, including a concept of property rights in the person, and argues for stronger legal protection of privacy in the shadow of developments in human genetics. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Lorys F. Oddi, Virginia R. Cassidy & Cheryl Fisher (1995). Nurses' Sensitivity To the Ethical Aspects of Clinical Practice. Nursing Ethics 2 (3):197-209.score: 985.0
    The purpose of this study was to describe the extent to which nurses perceive the ethical dimensions of clinical practice situations involving patients, families and health care professionals. Using the composite theory of basic moral principles and the professional standard of care established by legal custom as a framework, situations involving ethical dilemmas were gleaned from the nursing literature. They were reviewed for content validity, clarity and representativeness in a two-stage process by expert panels. The situations (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Joseph Raz (2009). Between Authority and Interpretation: On the Theory of Law and Practical Reason. Oxford University Press.score: 962.0
    Can there be a theory of law? -- Two views of the nature of the theory of law : a partial comparison -- On the nature of law -- The problem of authority : revisiting the service conception -- About morality and the nature of law -- Incorporation by law -- Reasoning with rules -- Why interpret? -- Interpretation without retrieval -- Intention in interpretation -- Interpretation : pluralism and innovation -- On the authority and interpretation of constitutions : some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Matthew B. O'Brien & Robert C. Koons (2012). Objects of Intention: A Hylomorphic Critique of the New Natural Law Theory. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):655-703.score: 946.7
    The “New Natural Law” Theory (NNL) of Germain Grisez, John Finnis, Joseph Boyle, and their collaborators offers a distinctive account of intentional action, which underlies a moral theory that aims to justify many aspects of traditional morality and Catholic doctrine. -/- In fact, we show that the NNL is committed to premises that entail the permissibility of many actions that are irreconcilable with traditional morality and Catholic doctrine, such as elective abortions. These consequences follow principally from two (...) of the NNL. The first aspect is its distinctive version of the planning theory of intention, in which adopting the 'first-person perspective' of an agent is a sufficient, and not merely necessary, condition for determining the nature of his intentional action; this planning theory rests upon an implicitly Cartesian conception of human behavior, in which behavior chosen by an agent has no intrinsic “intentionalness” apart from what he confers upon it as part of his plan. The second aspect is the NNL's distinctive account of basic human goods' incommensurability, according to which there is no common factor shared by basic human goods that allows them to be comparatively ranked in any way that directs practical deliberation. -/- The entailments of these two aspects of the NNL, we argue, amount to a reductio ad absurdum. Pace the proponents of the NNL account, we sketch an alternative hylomorphic conception of intentional action that avoids untoward moral implications by grounding human agency in the exercise of basic powers that are either (a) essential constituents of human nature or (b) acquired through participation in social practices. This conception of intentional action provides a stronger foundation for natural law theory. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Janez Krek (forthcoming). Two Principles of Early Moral Education: A Condition for the Law, Reflection and Autonomy. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-21.score: 935.0
    We establish the thesis that in moral education, particularly in the first years of the child’s development, unreflexive acts or unreflexiveness in certain behaviours of adults is a condition for the development of the personality structure and virtues that enable autonomous ethical reflection and a relation to the Other. With the notion of unreflexiveness we refer to resolvedness in the response of adults when it is necessary to establish a limit, or cut, in the child’s demand for pleasure, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.) (2008). Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 915.0
    This study provides a representation of the broad spectrum of theoretical work on topics related to business ethics, with a particular focus on corporate citizenship. It considers relations of business and society alongside social responsibility and moves on to examine the historical and systemic foundations of business ethics, focusing on the concepts of social and ethical responsibilities. The contributors explore established theories and concepts and their impact on moral behaviour. Together, the contributions offer varied philosophical theories in approaches (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Victor Tadros (2011). The Ends of Harm: The Moral Foundations of Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 910.0
    This book offers a critical examination of those theories and advances a new argument for punishment's justification, calling it the 'duty view'.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Joel Feinberg (1984). The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 910.0
    In this volume, Feinberg focuses on the meanings of "interest," the relationship between interests and wants, and the distinction between want-regarding and ideal-regarding analyses on interest and hard cases for the applications of the concept of harm. Examples of the "hard cases" are harm to character, vicarious harm, and prenatal and posthumous harm. Feinberg also discusses the relationship between harm and rights, the concept of a victim, and the distinctions of various quantitative dimensions of harm, consent, and offense, including the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Lyons (1971/1993). Moral Aspects of Legal Theory: Essays on Law, Justice, and Political Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.score: 907.7
    David Lyons is one of the preeminent philosophers of law active in the United States. This volume comprises essays written over a period of twenty years in which Professor Lyons outlines his fundamental views about the nature of law and its relation to morality and justice. The underlying theme of the book is that a system of law has only a tenuous connection with morality and justice. Contrary to those legal theorists who maintain that no matter how bad the law (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Scott Veitch (2007). Law and Irresponsibility: On the Legitimation of Human Suffering. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 906.0
    It is commonly understood that in its focus on rights and obligations law is centrally concerned with organising responsibility. In defining how obligations are created, in contract or property law, say, or imposed, as in tort, public, or criminal law, law and legal institutions are usually seen as society’s key mode of asserting and defining the content and scope of responsibilities. This book takes the converse view: legal institutions are centrally involved in organising irresponsibility. Particularly with respect to the production (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. N. E. Simmonds (2007). Law as a Moral Idea. Oxford University Press.score: 906.0
    This book argues that the institutions of law, and the structures of legal thought, are to be understood by reference to a moral ideal of freedom or independence from the power of others. The moral value and justificatory force of law are not contingent upon circumstance, but intrinsic to its character. Doctrinal legal arguments are shaped by rival conceptions of the conditions for realization of the idea of law. In making these claims, the author rejects the viewpoint of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Neil MacCormick (2008). Practical Reason in Law and Morality. Oxford University Press.score: 902.7
    Incentives and reasons -- Values and human nature -- Right and wrong -- Questions of trust -- Autonomy and freedom -- Obedience, freedom, and engagement : or utility? -- Society, property, and commerce -- On justice -- Using freedom well -- Judging : legal cases and moral questions -- Practical reason, law, and state.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Geoffrey C. Hazard (2013). Moral Foundations of American Law: Faith, Virtue and Mores. Intersentia.score: 895.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. M. N. G. Dukes (2005). The Law and Ethics of the Pharmaceutical Industry. Elsevier.score: 890.0
    As one of the most massive and successful business sectors, the pharmaceutical industry is a potent force for good in the community, yet its behaviour is frequently questioned: could it serve society at large better than it has done in the recent past? Its own internal ethics, both in business and science, may need a careful reappraisal, as may the extent to which the law - administrative, civil and criminal - succeeds in guiding (and where neccessary contraining) it. The rules (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Sandra L. Christensen (2008). The Role of Law in Models of Ethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (4):451 - 461.score: 883.3
    In attempting to improve ethical decision-making in business organizations, researchers have developed models of ethical decision-making processes. Most of these models do not include a role for law in ethical decision-making, or if law is mentioned, it is set as a boundary constraint, exogenous to the decision process. However, many decision models in business ethics are based on cognitive moral development theory, in which the law is thought to be the external referent of individuals at the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Lars-Eric Nilsson (2008). "But Can't You See They Are Lying": Student Moral Positions and Ethical Practices in the Wake of Technological Change. Distribution, Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis.score: 880.7
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Alberto Bondolfi (2000). Ethics, Law and Legislation: The Institutionalisation of Moral Reflection. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (1):27-37.score: 876.7
    This paper describes the different dimensions of the relation between moral reflection and legislative processes. It discusses some examples of the institutionalisation of moral reflection. It is argued that the relation between ethics and law is still an actual and relevant question. Ethics also has to reflect on its own role in political life. The paper defends the relevance of a theological perspective on the relation between law and ethics. In the last part it is argued that the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.) (2004). Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 825.0
    This volume offers a unique perspective on the discussion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by broadening the terms of the debate to include secular as well as religious investigations not normally considered. Its contributed essays feature a structured dialogue between representatives of the following ethical traditions-- Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, feminism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, liberalism, natural law, pacifism, and realism--who address identical moral issues in order to create a dialogue both within and across traditions.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alan W. Norrie (2000). Punishment, Responsibility, and Justice: A Relational Critique. Oxford University Press.score: 820.0
    This book addresses the retributive and "orthodox subjectivist" theories that dominate criminal justice theory alongside recent "revisionist" and "postmodern" approaches. Norrie argues that all these approaches, together with their faults and contradictions, stem from their orientation to themes in Kantian moral philosophy. He explores an alternative relational or dialectical approach; examines the work of Ashworth, Duff, Fletcher, Moore, Smith, and Williams; and considers key doctrinal issues.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Derek Hill & Caroline Jones (eds.) (2003). Forms of Ethical Thinking in Therapeutic Practice. Open University Press.score: 820.0
    Most books about ethics focus either on the origins of ethics, or on the application of ethical thinking to a single form of therapy. This book sets out to span a range of very different forms of therapy and explores the similarities and the differences between the ethical thinking of the practitioners concerned. By looking at ethical issues in different therapeutic settings the reader is challenged to reconsider the working assumptions which underpin familiar therapeutic practice. Readers (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. David N. Weisstub (ed.) (1998). Research on Human Subjects: Ethics, Law, and Social Policy. Pergamon.score: 816.0
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Adela Cortina (2000). Civil Ethics and the Validity of Law. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (1):39-55.score: 815.0
    This paper aims to clarify the nature and contents of 'civil ethics' and the source of the binding force of its obligations. This ethics should provide the criteria for evaluating the moral validity of social, legal and morally valid law. The article starts with observing that in morally pluralist Western societies civil ethics already exists, and has gradually started to play the role of guiding the law. It is argued that civil ethics should not be conceived as 'civic morals' (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jack L. Goldsmith (2007). The Limits of International Law. Oxford University Press.score: 805.0
    A theory of customary international law -- Case studies -- A theory of international agreements -- Human rights -- International trade -- A theory of international rhetoric -- International law and moral obligation -- Liberal democracy and cosmopolitan duty.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jens Peter Brune (2010). Moral Und Recht: Zur Diskurstheorie des Rechts Und der Demokratie von Jürgen Habermas. Alber.score: 805.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Abner Greene (2012). Against Obligation: The Multiple Sources of Authority in a Liberal Democracy. Harvard University Press.score: 805.0
    Introduction -- Against political obligation -- Accommodating our plural obligations -- Against interpretive obligation to the past -- Against interpretive obligation to the Supreme Court.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. José Antonio Marina (2000). Genealogy of Morality and Law. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (3):303-325.score: 800.0
    In order to clarify the relationship between morality and law, it is necessary to define both concepts precisely. Cultural realities refer to concepts which are more specifically defined if we focus towards the genealogy of those realities, that is to say, their motivation, function and aim. Should we start from legal anthropology, comparative law and history of law, law arises as a social technique which coactively imposes ways of solving conflicts, protecting fundamental values for a society's co-existence. Values subject to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Svend Andersen (2001). Theological Ethics, Moral Philosophy, and Natural Law. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (4):349-364.score: 800.0
    The article deals with the relationship between theological ethics and moral philosophy. The former is seen as a theoretical reflection on Christian ethics, the latter as one on secular ethics. The main questions asked are: (1) Is there one and only one pre-theoretical knowledge about acting rightly? (2) Does philosophy provide us with the theoretical framework for understanding both Christian and secular ethics? Both questions are answered in the negative. In the course of argument, four positions are presented: theological (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Chris Gastmans, Bernadette Dierckx de Casterle & Paul Schotsmans (1998). Nursing Considered as Moral Practice: A Philosophical-Ethical Interpretation of Nursing. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (1):43-69.score: 796.0
    : Discussions of ethical approaches in nursing have been much enlivened in recent years, for instance by new developments in the theory of care. Nevertheless, many ethical concepts in nursing still need to be clarified. The purpose of this contribution is to develop a fundamental ethical view on nursing care considered as moral practice. Three main components are analyzed more deeply--i.e., the caring relationship, caring behavior as the integration of virtue and expert activity, and "good (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Carla Hotel & Joan Brockman (1997). Legal Ethics in the Practice of Family Law: Playing Chess While Mountain Climbing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (8):809-816.score: 795.0
    Current literature suggests that the adversarial legal system may undergo some changes or may even be transformed by a recent influx of women lawyers into the profession. Such research indicates that women may approach ethical problems differently than men. This paper examines the responses of family law lawyers in Vancouver, British Columbia and the surrounding Lower Mainland to a hypothetical case which requires an assessment of professional responsibilities in light of potential conflicts in personal moral values.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Patrick Lee Plaisance (2011). Moral Agency in Media: Toward a Model to Explore Key Components of Ethical Practice. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (2):96 - 113.score: 793.3
    Recent advances in moral psychology and applications of virtue science have created promising opportunities to refine theories of media practice and ethical principles. This article sets forth the theoretical foundation for a model of virtuous action among media exemplars that is multidimensional, inductive, and informed by these developments. The model draws on a range of psycho-social assessment tools to explore five key dimensions of virtuous behavior: story of the self, personality, integration of morality into the self, (...) ecology, and moral skills and knowledge. The model's structure is designed to strengthen the empirical basis used to make normative and predictive claims about media practice. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Eric W. Stein & Norita Ahmad (2009). Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (Ahp) to Construct a Measure of the Magnitude of Consequences Component of Moral Intensity. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):391 - 407.score: 790.0
    The purpose of this work is to elaborate an empirically grounded mathematical model of the magnitude of consequences component of “moral intensity” (Jones, Academy of Management Review 16 (2),366, 1991) that can be used to evaluate different ethical situations. The model is built using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) (Saaty, The Analytic Hierarchy Process , 1980) and empirical data from the legal profession. One contribution of our work is that it illustrates how AHP can be applied in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Joseph B. R. Gaie (2004). The Ethics of Medical Involvement in Capital Punishment: A Philosophical Discussion. Kluwer Academic.score: 786.0
    This book examines the extremely important issue of the consistency of medical involvement in ending lives in medicine, law and war. It uses philosophical theory to show why medical doctors may be involved at different stages of the capital punishment process. The author uses the theories of Emmanuel Kant and John S. Mill, combined with Gerwith's principle of generic consistency, to concretize ethics in capital punishment practice. This book does not discuss the moral justification of capital punishment, but (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Nora Hämäläinen (2009). Is Moral Theory Harmful in Practice?—Relocating Anti-Theory in Contemporary Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (5):539 - 553.score: 780.0
    In this paper I discuss the viability of the claim that at least some forms of moral theory are harmful for sound moral thought and practice. This claim was put forward by e.g. Elisabeth Anscombe ( 1981 ( 1958 )) and by Annette Baier, Peter Winch, D.Z Phillips and Bernard Williams in the 1970’s–1980’s. To this day aspects of it have found resonance in both post-Wittgensteinian and virtue ethical quarters. The criticism has on one hand (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Alan W. Norrie (2005). Law and the Beautiful Soul. Published in the United States by Cavendish Pub..score: 780.0
    What is law? How is legal responsibility defined? How does law reflect moral judgment? Why are law's definitions uncertain and conflicted? Basic questions for liberal law and criminal justice - what could they have to do with the forgotten historical figure of the Beautiful Soul? Starting from concrete legal issues, Alan Norrie develops a critical vision of law in its relation to morality and socio-historical context. Liberal law, he argues, is marked by splits and contradictions (antinomies), signs of something (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Bernice Bovenkerk & Franck L. B. Meijboom (2012). The Moral Status of Fish. The Importance and Limitations of a Fundamental Discussion for Practical Ethical Questions in Fish Farming. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):843-860.score: 763.0
    As the world population is growing and government directives tell us to consume more fatty acids, the demand for fish is increasing. Due to declines in wild fish populations, we have come to rely more and more on aquaculture. Despite rapid expansion of aquaculture, this sector is still in a relatively early developmental stage. This means that this sector can still be steered in a favorable direction, which requires discussion about sustainability. If we want to avoid similar problems to the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Hazel Biggs (2010). Healthcare Research Ethics and Law: Regulation, Review and Responsibility. Routledge-Cavendish.score: 762.7
    The book explores and explains the relationship between law and ethics in the context of medically related research in order to provide a practical guide to ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Suárez Espino & María Lidia (2008). El Derecho a la Intimidad Genética. Marcial Pons, Ediciones Jurídicas y Sociales.score: 760.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Christiane Gohier & France Jutras (eds.) (2009). Repères Pour l'Éthique Professionnelle des Enseignants. Presses de l'Université du Québec.score: 760.0
    Avec le mouvement de professionnalisation de l'enseignement, la compétence éthique est devenue une caractéristique désirée du professionnalisme dans l'enseignement.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Dr Matthew Lipman (1987). Ethical Reasoning and the Craft of Moral Practice. Journal of Moral Education 16 (2):139-147.score: 760.0
    Non-indoctrinational moral education involves teaching children to engage in ethical inquiry. This means that, since ethical inquiry has the status of a craft, the students will be apprentices in that craft. The classroom becomes, for this purpose, a community of ethical inquiry ? an ethical atelier where students learn the tools, methods, practices and procedures which craftsmen associated with that tradition customarily utilize. It is only when one is adept at the generic procedures of reasoning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Edward A. Malloy (1982/1983). The Ethics of Law Enforcement and Criminal Punishment. University Press of America.score: 760.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Hamide Tacir (2011). Hastanın Kendi Geleceğini Belirleme Hakkı. Xii Levha.score: 760.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. David F. Walbert (1973). Abortion, Society, and the Law. Cleveland [Ohio]Press of Case Western Reserve University.score: 756.7
    George, B. J. Jr. The evolving law of abortion.--Guttmacher, A. F. The genesis of liberalized abortion in New York: a personal insight.--Callahan, D. Abortion: some ethical issues.--Jakobovits, I. Jewish views on abortion.--Drinan, R. F. The inviolability of the right to be born.--Schwartz, R. A. Abortion on request: the psychiatric implications.--Fleck, S. A psychiatrist's views on abortion.--Niswander, K. R. Abortion practices in the United States: a medical viewpoint.--Macintyre, M. N. Genetic risk, prenatal diagnosis, and selective abortion.--Messerman, G. A. Abortion counselling: (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Mark Tunick (1998). Practices and Principles: Approaches to Ethical and Legal Judgment. Princeton University Press.score: 756.0
    Are there universally valid moral principles that dictate what's right regardless of what the consensus is within a particular society? Or are moral judgments culturally relative, ultimately dictated by conventions and practices which vary among societies? Practices and Principles takes up the debate between cultural relativists and universalists, and the related debate in political philosophy between communitarians and liberals, each of which has roots in an earlier debate between Kant and Hegel. Rejecting uncritical deference to social practice, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000