Search results for 'Preconditions of good life' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Context of Human Life (2001). Section I Interpreting Illness and Medicine in the Context of Human Life: Experience Vs. Objectivity. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & Evandro Agazzi (eds.), Life Interpretation and the Sense of Illness Within the Human Condition. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 1.score: 1830.0
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  2. Goodness Of Life (2013). The Badness of Death and the Goodness of Life. In Fred Feldman Ben Bradley (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Death.score: 1650.0
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  3. Arto Laitinen, Social Equality, Recognition, and Preconditions of Good Life. Social Inequality Today.score: 1626.0
    In this paper I analyze interpersonal and institutional recognition and discuss the relation of different types of recognition to various principles of social justice (egalitarianism, meritarianism, legitimate favouritism, principles of need and free exchange). Further, I try to characterize contours of good autonomous life, and ask what kind of preconditions it has. I will distinguish between five kinds of preconditions: psychological, material, cultural, intersubjective and institutional. After examining what the role of recognition is among such (...), and how they figure in the work of Axel Honneth, Nancy Fraser and Charles Taylor, I suggest a somewhat complex and hopefully rich picture of interpersonal and institutional recognition as a precondition of autonomous good life. (shrink)
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  4. Maartje Schermer (2003). In Search of `the Good Life' for Demented Elderly. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):35-44.score: 684.0
    It may seem paradoxical to speak of the ‘goodlife’ for demented elderly. Many people consider dementia to be a life-wrecking disease and nursing homes to be terrible places. Still, it is relevant to ask how we can make life as good as possible for demented nursing home residents. This paper explores what three standard philosophical accounts of well-being — subjective preference theory, objectivist theories, and hedonism — have to say about the good life for demented (...)
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  5. Amy Olberding (2013). Confucius' Complaints and the Analects' Account of the Good Life. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):417-440.score: 603.0
    The Analects appears to offer two bodies of testimony regarding the felt, experiential qualities of leading a life of virtue. In its ostensible record of Confucius’ more abstract and reflective claims, the text appears to suggest that virtue has considerable power to afford joy and insulate from sorrow. In the text’s inclusion of Confucius’ less studied and apparently more spontaneous remarks, however, he appears sometimes to complain of the life he leads, to feel its sorrows, and to possess (...)
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  6. Bart van Leeuwen (2006). Social Attachments as Conditions for the Condition of the Good Life? A Critique of Will Kymlicka's Moral Monism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (3):401-428.score: 598.0
    The moral justification of Will Kymlicka's theory of minority rights is unconvincing. According to Kymlicka, cultural embeddedness is a necessary condition for personal autonomy (which is, in turn, the precondition for the good life) and for that reason liberals should be concerned about culture. I will criticize this instrumentalism of social attachments and the moral monism behind it. On the basis of a modification of Axel Honneth's theory of recognition, I will reject the false opposition between the instrumental (...)
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  7. Edward H. Spence (2011). Information, Knowledge and Wisdom: Groundwork for the Normative Evaluation of Digital Information and its Relation to the Good Life. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):261-275.score: 594.0
    This paper provides a general philosophical groundwork for the theoretical and applied normative evaluation of information generally and digital information specifically in relation to the good life. The overall aim of the paper is to address the question of how Information Ethics and computer ethics more generally can be expanded to include more centrally the issue of how and to what extent information relates and contributes to the quality of life or the good life , (...)
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  8. Edward Spence (2011). Is Technology Good for Us? A Eudaimonic Meta-Model for Evaluating the Contributive Capability of Technologies for a Good Life. NanoEthics 5 (3):335-343.score: 594.0
    The title refers to the question addressed in this paper, namely, to what degree if any technology, including nanotechnologies, in the form of products and processes, is capable of contributing to a good life. To answer that question, the paper will develop a meta-normative model whose primary purpose is to determine the essential conditions that any normative theory of the Good Life and Technology (T-GLAT) must adequately address in order to be able to account for, explain (...)
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  9. Jean Kazez (2007). The Weight of Things: Philosophy and the Good Life. Blackwell Pub..score: 585.0
    The Weight of Things explores the hard questions of our daily lives, examining both classic and contemporary accounts of what it means to lead 'the good life'. Looks at the views of philosophers such as Aristotle, the Stoics, Mill, Nietzsche, and Sartre as well as contributions from other traditions, such as Buddhism Incorporates key arguments from contemporary philosophers including Peter Singer, Martha Nussbaum, Robert Nozick, John Finnis, and Susan Wolf Uses examples from biography, literature, history, movies and media, (...)
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  10. Aaron Smuts (2013). The Good Cause Account of the Meaning of Life. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):536-562.score: 567.0
    I defend the theory that one's life is meaningful to the extent that one promotes the good. Call this the good cause account (GCA) of the meaning of life. It holds that the good effects that count towards the meaning of one's life need not be intentional. Nor must one be aware of the effects. Nor does it matter whether the same good would have resulted if one had not existed. What matters is (...)
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  11. Paul Steinberg (2003). Study Guide to Jewish Ethics: A Reader's Companion to Matters of Life and Death, to Do the Right and the Good, Love Your Neighbor and Yourself. The Jewish Publication Society.score: 558.0
    This companion to Elliot Dorff's three books on Jewish ethics -- Matters of Life and Death , To Do the Right and the Good , and Love Your Neighbor and Yourself -- is designed for group as well as individual study. Through suggested readings from Dorff's books, probing questions, lively discussion topics, and simple writing exercises, readers will be able to analyze and clarify their own positions on a host of controversial issues: sex, surrogate motherhood, adoption, family abuse, (...)
     
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  12. Herbert McCabe (2005). The Good Life: Ethics and the Pursuit of Happiness. Continuum.score: 535.5
    The Dalai Lama once wrote that the object of human existence was to be happy. This sounds extremely glib as happiness in the popular imagination is a feeling and in the words of the song 'the greatest gift that we possess'. On the other hand, von Hugel wrote 'Religion has never made me happy;it's no use shutting your eyes to the fact that the deeper you go, the more alone you will find yourself' This small masterpiece by the late Fr (...)
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  13. Fred Feldman (2002). The Good Life: A Defense of Attitudinal Hedonism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):604-628.score: 513.0
    The students and colleagues of Roderick Chisholm admired and respected Chisholm. Many were filled not only with admiration, but with affection and gratitude for Chisholm throughout the time we knew him. Even now that he is dead, we continue to wish him well. Under the circumstances, many of us probably think that that wish amounts to no more than this: we hope that things went well for him when he lived; we hope that he had a good life.
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  14. Fred Feldman (2004). Pleasure and the Good Life: Concerning the Nature, Varieties and Plausibility of Hedonism. Clarendon Press.score: 513.0
    Fred Feldman's fascinating new book sets out to defend hedonism as a theory about the Good Life. He tries to show that, when carefully and charitably interpreted, certain forms of hedonism yield plausible evaluations of human lives. Feldman begins by explaining the question about the Good Life. As he understands it, the question is not about the morally good life or about the beneficial life. Rather, the question concerns the general features of the (...)
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  15. Alastair Norcross (2007). Varieties of Hedonism in Feldman's Pleasure and the Good Life. Utilitas 19 (3):388-397.score: 513.0
    In these comments on Fred Feldman's Pleasure and the Good Life, I first challenge the dichotomy between sensory and attitudinal hedonisms as perhaps presenting a false dilemma. I suggest that there may be a form of hedonism that employs the concept of a that is not purely sensory. Next, I raise some problems for several of the versions of hedonism explored in the book.
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  16. Tsjalling Swierstra & Katinka Waelbers (2012). Designing a Good Life: A Matrix for the Technological Mediation of Morality. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):157-172.score: 513.0
    Technologies fulfill a social role in the sense that they influence the moral actions of people, often in unintended and unforeseen ways. Scientists and engineers are already accepting much responsibility for the technological, economical and environmental aspects of their work. This article asks them to take an extra step, and now also consider the social role of their products. The aim is to enable engineers to take a prospective responsibility for the future social roles of their technologies by providing them (...)
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  17. Raimond Gaita (1983). Ii. Virtues, Human Good, and the Unity of a Life. Inquiry 26 (4):407 – 424.score: 513.0
    Maclntyre's ?disquieting suggestion? concerning the apparently irretrievably anarchic state of contemporary moral discourse begs the crucial questions in any argument over the notion of ?incoherence? in moral thought and practice. Thus his attempt to establish the canonical authority of Aristotelianism fails. Nonetheless, the attempt to reconstruct a plausible Aristotelianism is of independent interest. Maclntyre introduces the quasi?technical notion of a ?practice? to locate a non?reductive teleology of the virtues. Though certain teleological expressions come naturally in a deepened understanding of the (...)
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  18. Claudia Lenz & Gertrudetr Postl (2005). The End or the Apotheosis of "Labor"? Hannah Arendt’s Contribution to the Question of the Good Life in Times of Global Superfluity of Human Labor Power. Hypatia 20 (2):135-154.score: 513.0
    : This paper relates Arendt's critique of a labor society to her thoughts on the "good life." I begin with the claim that in the post–mass production era, Western societies, traditionally centered around gainful employment, encounter a decrease in the relevance of labor and can thus no longer rely on it as a resource for individual or social meaning. From Arendt's perspective, however, the current situation allows for the possibility of a transition from a society based on labor (...)
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  19. P. Jesse Rine (2007). A Rview Of “Musonius Rufus and Education in the Good Life: A Model of Teaching and Living Virtue”. Educational Studies 42 (1):77-81.score: 513.0
    (2007). A Rview Of “Musonius Rufus and Education in the Good Life: A Model of Teaching and Living Virtue”. Educational Studies: Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 77-81.
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  20. Marianne Boenink & Simone van der Burg (2010). Informed Decision Making About Predictive DNA Tests: Arguments for More Public Visibility of Personal Deliberations About the Good Life. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):127-138.score: 513.0
    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of people’s life. The decision whether or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes to (...)
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  21. Claudia Lenz & Gertrude Postl (2005). The End or the Apotheosis of "Labor"? Hannah Arendt's Contribution to the Question of the Good Life in Times of Global Superfluity of Human Labor Power. Hypatia 20 (2):135 - 154.score: 513.0
    This paper relates Arendt's critique of a labor society to her thoughts on the "good life." I begin with the claim that in the post-mass production era, Western societies, traditionally centered around gainful employment, encounter a decrease in the relevance of labor and can thus no longer rely on it as a resource for individual or social meaning. From Arendt's perspective, however, the current situation allows for the possibility of a transition from a society based on labor to (...)
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  22. Michael B. Gill (2009). Is the Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide Compatible with Good End-of-Life Care? Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):27-45.score: 495.0
    abstract Many have held that there is some kind of incompatibility between a commitment to good end-of-life care and the legalization of physician-assisted suicide. This opposition to physician-assisted suicide encompasses a cluster of different claims. In this essay I try to clarify some of the most important of these claims and show that they do not stand up well to conceptual and empirical scrutiny.
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  23. Frans W. A. Brom (2000). The Good Life of Creatures with Dignity Some Comments on the Swiss Expert Opinion. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):53-63.score: 490.5
    The notion of Dignity of Creatures has been voted into the Swiss Federal Constitution by a plebiscite. Philipp Balzer, Klaus-Peter Rippe, and Peter Schaber have given an expert opinion for the Swiss government to clarify the notion of Dignity of Creatures. According to them, by voting this notion into the Swiss constitution, the Swiss have chosen for a limited biocentric approach towards biotechnology. In such an approach genetic engineering of non-human beings is only allowed insofar that their own good (...)
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  24. Thaddeus Metz (2011). The Good, the True and the Beautiful: Toward a Unified Account of Great Meaning in Life. Religious Studies 47 (4):389-409.score: 486.0
    Three of the great sources of meaning in life are the good, the true, and the beautiful, and I aim to make headway on the grand Enlightenment project of ascertaining what, if anything, they have in common. Concretely, if we take a (stereotypical) Mother Teresa, Mandela, Darwin, Einstein, Dostoyevsky, and Picasso, what might they share that makes it apt to deem their lives to have truly mattered? I provide reason to doubt two influential answers, noting a common flaw (...)
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  25. Chris Higgins (2011). The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 483.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface (Richard Smith) -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction : Why We Need a Virtue Ethics of Teaching. Saints and scoundrels ; A brief for teacherly self-cultivation ; From the terrain of teaching to the definition of professional ethics ; Outline of the argument -- PART I. The Virtues of Vocation : From Moral Professionalism to Practical Ethics -- Chapter 1. Work and Flourishing : Williams' Critique of Morality and its Implications for Professional Ethics. Retrieving Socrates' question ; (...)
     
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  26. D. A. A. Loose (2004). The Highest Good and the Kingdom of God in the Philosophy of Kant: A Moral Concept and a Religious Metaphor of the Good Life. In Marcel Sarot & W. Stoker (eds.), Religion and the Good Life. Royal van Gorcum. 195--211.score: 468.0
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  27. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2013). Cognitive Revolution, Virtuality and Good Life. AI and Society 28 (3):319-327.score: 461.3
    We are living in an era when the focus of human relationships with the world is shifting from execution and physical impact to control and cognitive/informational interaction. This emerging, increasingly informational world is our new ecology, an infosphere that presents the grounds for a cognitive revolution based on interactions in networks of biological and artificial, intelligent agents. After the industrial revolution, which extended the human body through mechanical machinery, the cognitive revolution extends the human mind/cognition through information-processing machinery. These novel (...)
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  28. Stephen M. Campbell (forthcoming). When the Shape of a Life Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-11.score: 459.0
    It seems better to have a life that begins poorly and ends well than a life that begins well and ends poorly. One possible explanation is that the very ‘shape’ of a life can be good or bad for us. If so, this raises a tough question: when can the shape of our lives be good or bad for us? In this essay, I present and critique an argument that the shape of a life (...)
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  29. Richard Kinnier (ed.) (2010). "The Meaning of Life": According to the Great and the Good. Palazzo Editions.score: 459.0
    Life is to be enjoyed -- We are here to serve God -- We are here to seek wisdom and self-actualization -- The meaning of life is a mystery -- Life is meaningless -- We are here to help others -- Life is a struggle -- We are here to contribute to society -- We must create meaning for ourselves -- Life is absurd.
     
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  30. Joshua Glasgow (2013). The Shape of a Life and the Value of Loss and Gain. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):665-682.score: 454.5
    We ordinarily think that, keeping all else equal, a life that improves is better than one that declines. However, it has proven challenging to account for such value judgments: some, such as Fred Feldman and Daniel Kahneman, have simply denied that these judgments are rational, while others, such as Douglas Portmore, Michael Slote, and David Velleman, have proposed justifications for the judgments that appear to be incomplete or otherwise problematic. This article identifies problems with existing accounts and suggests a (...)
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  31. Raúl Fornet-Betancourt (ed.) (2010). Gutes Leben Als Humanisiertes Leben: Vorstellungen Vom Guten Leben in den Kulturen Und Ihre Bedeutung für Politik Und Gesellschaft Heute: Dokumentation des Viii. Internationalen Kongresses für Interkulturelle Philosophie = Good Life as Humanized Life: Concepts of Good Life in Different Cultures and Their Meanings for Politics and Societies Today = la Vida Buena Como Vida Humanizante: Concepciones de la Vida Buena En Las Culturas y Sus Consecuencias Para la Política y la Sociedad Hoy En Día. Wissenschaftsverlag Mainz.score: 438.8
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  32. Jürgen Habermas (2010). Review Article: The 'Good Life'—A 'Detestable Phrase': The Significance of the Young Rawls's Religious Ethics for His Political Theory. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):443-454.score: 436.5
  33. Peter Sondøe (1999). Quality of Life - Three Competing Views. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (1):11-23.score: 436.5
    The aim of the present paper is to describe three different attempts, which have been made by philosophers, to define what quality of life is; and to spell out some of the difficulties that faces each definition. One, Perfectionism, focuses on the capacities that human beings possess: capacities for friendship, knowledge and creative activity, for instance. It says that the good life consists in the development and use of these capacities. Another account, the Preference Theory, urges that (...)
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  34. Clano Aydin (2009). On the Significance of Ideals: Charles S. Peirce and the Good Life. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (3):pp. 422-443.score: 436.5
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  35. William Braxton Irvine (2009). A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy. Oxford University Press.score: 436.5
    Irvine looks at various Stoic techniques for attaining tranquility and shows how to put these techniques to work in our own life.
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  36. Charlie Huenemann (2008). The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, and the Cultivation of Virtue. Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (2):pp. 321-322.score: 436.5
  37. Ronald Duska (1980). Philosophy, Literature and Views of the Good Life. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 54:181-188.score: 436.5
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  38. David Resnick (2006). 'What Could Be Better Than This?' Conflicting Visions of the Good Life in Traditional Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (3):329–344.score: 436.5
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  39. Glenn Worthington (2005). Poetic Experience and the Good Life in the Writings of Michael Oakeshott. European Journal of Political Theory 4 (1):57-66.score: 436.5
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  40. Fred E. Brown (1929). The Quest of the Good Life: An Essay Towards a Philosophy of Religion. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):177 – 187.score: 436.5
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  41. Vaughana Feary (2005). Art and the Good Life: The Role of Literature and the Visual Arts in Philosophical Practice. Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association 1 (2):95-112.score: 436.5
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  42. Paul E. Kirkland (2001). Cooper, Laurence D. Rousseau, Nature, and the Problem of the Good Life. Review of Metaphysics 54 (3):648-649.score: 436.5
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  43. Steve Heilig (1993). Final Passages: Positive Choices for the Dying and Their Loved Ones, Judith Ahronheim and Doron Weber, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992. 285 Pp.A Good Death: Taking More Control at the End of Your Life, David Shirley and T. Patrick Hill, New York: Addison-Wesley, 1992. 224 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (01):111-.score: 436.5
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  44. Iap Wogu (2008). Making the Most of Life: A Critical Analysis of the Greek Metaphysical Conception of the Good Life. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 9 (2).score: 436.5
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  45. Lydia B. Amir (2012). The Good Life Is the Good Laugh: The Comic in the History of Philosophy. In A. Ziv & A. Sover (eds.), The Importance of Not Being Earnest. Carmel Press. 206-253.score: 436.5
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  46. D. -P. Baker (2001). Mackie's Moral Theory: Conceptual Room for a Taylor-Made Account of the Good Life? South African Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):145-158.score: 436.5
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  47. Lana Peternel, Ana Malnar & Irena Martinović Klarić (forthcoming). Analysis of a Cultural Consensus Model of Two Good-Life Sub-Domains – Health & Well-Being and Migration & Socioeconomic Milieu – in Three Population Groups in Croatia. Journal of Biosocial Science:1-24.score: 436.5
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  48. Edmund S. Phelps (2008). The Good Life and the Good Economy: The Humanist Perspective of Aristotle, the Pragmatists and Vitalists, and the Economic Justice of John Rawls. In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oup Oxford.score: 436.5
     
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  49. Susan Wolf (1997). Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life. Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (01):207-.score: 427.5
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  50. Jon Elster (1986). Self-Realization in Work and Politics: The Marxist Conception of the Good Life. Social Philosophy and Policy 3 (02):97-.score: 427.5
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