Search results for 'Prefrontal Cortex' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Laura Ferreri, JeanJulien Aucouturier, Mark Muthalib, Emmanuel Bigand & Aurelia Bugaiska (2013). Music Improves Verbal Memory Encoding While Decreasing Prefrontal Cortex Activity: An fNIRS Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:779.score: 240.0
    Listening to music engages the whole brain, thus stimulating cognitive performance in a range of non purely musical activities such as language and memory tasks. This article addresses an ongoing debate on the link between music and memory for words. While evidence on healthy and clinical populations suggests that music listening can improve verbal memory in a variety of situations, it is still unclear what specific memory process is affected and how. This study was designed to explore the hypothesis that (...)
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  2. Stefon J. R. Van Noordt & Sidney J. Segalowitz (2012). Performance Monitoring and the Medial Prefrontal Cortex: A Review of Individual Differences and Context Effects as a Window on Self-Regulation. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:197-197.score: 240.0
    The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is central to self-regulation and has been implicated in generating a cluster of event-related potential components, collectively referred to as medial frontal negativities (MFNs). These MFNs are elicited while individuals monitor behavioural and environmental consequences, and include the error-related negativity, Nogo N2, and the feedback-related negativity. A growing cognitive and affective neuroscience literature indicates that the activation of the anterior cingulate cortex and surrounding medial prefrontal regions during performance monitoring is not (...)
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  3. Moria J. Smoski Lihong Wang, Natalie Paul, Steven J. Stanton, Jeffrey M. Greeson (2013). Loss of Sustained Activity in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Response to Repeated Stress in Individuals with Early-Life Emotional Abuse: Implications for Depression Vulnerability. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Repeated psychosocial stress in early life has significant impact on both behavior and neural function which, together, increase vulnerability to depression. However, neural mechanisms related to repeated stress remain unclear. We hypothesize that early-life stress may result in a reduced capacity for cognitive control in response to a repeated stressor, particularly in individuals who developed maladaptive emotional processing strategies, namely trait rumination. Individuals who encountered early-life stress but have adaptive emotional processing, namely trait mindfulness, may demonstrate an opposite pattern. Using (...)
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  4. Anna Abraham (2013). The World According to Me: Personal Relevance and the Medial Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    More than a decade of neuroimaging research has established that anterior and posterior cortical midline regions are consistently recruited during self-referential thinking. These regions are engaged under conditions of directed cognition, such as during explicit self-reference tasks, as well as during spontaneous cognition, such as under conditions of rest. One of the many issues that remain to be clarified regarding the relationship between self-referential thinking and cortical midline activity is the functional specificity of these regions with regard to the nature (...)
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  5. Angela H. Gutchess Brittany S. Cassidy (2012). Structural Variation Within the Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Predicts Memory for Impressions in Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Research has shown that lesions to regions involved in social and emotional cognition disrupt socioemotional processing and memory. We investigated how structural variation of regions involved in socioemotional memory (ventromedial prefrontal cortex [vmPFC], amygdala), as opposed to a region implicated in explicit memory (hippocampus), affected memory for impressions in young and older adults. Anatomical MRI scans for fifteen young and fifteen older adults were obtained and reconstructed to gather information about cortical thickness and subcortical volume. Young adults had (...)
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  6. Annie Wai Yiu Chan (2013). Functional Organization and Visual Representations of Human Ventral Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex even in the absence of working memory demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex remain unclear. Further, in a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of (...)
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  7. Yusuke Moriguchi & Kazuo Hiraki (2013). Prefrontal Cortex and Executive Function in Young Children: A Review of NIRS Studies. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:867.score: 240.0
    Executive function refers to the higher-order cognitive control process for the attainment of a specific goal. There are several subcomponents of executive function, such as inhibition, cognitive shifting, and working memory. Extensive neuroimaging research in adults has revealed that the lateral prefrontal cortex plays an important role in executive function. Developmental studies have reported behavioral evidence showing that executive function changes significantly during preschool years. However, the neural mechanism of executive function in young children is still unclear. This (...)
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  8. Theofanis I. Panagiotaropoulos, Vishal Kapoor & Nikos K. Logothetis (2013). Desynchronization and Rebound of Beta Oscillations During Conscious and Unconscious Local Neuronal Processing in the Macaque Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Accumulating evidence indicates that control mechanisms are not tightly bound to conscious perception since both conscious and unconscious information can trigger control processes, probably through the activation of higher-order association areas like the prefrontal cortex. Studying the modulation of control-related prefrontal signals in a microscopic, neuronal level during conscious and unconscious neuronal processing and under control-free conditions could provide an elementary understanding of these interactions. Here we performed extracellular electrophysiological recordings in the macaque lateral prefrontal (...) (LPFC) during monocular physical alternation (PA) and binocular flash suppression (BFS) and studied the local scale relationship between beta (15-30Hz) oscillations, a rhythmic signal believed to reflect the current sensory, motor or cognitive state (status-quo),and conscious or unconscious neuronal processing. First, we show that beta oscillations are observed in the LPFC during resting state. Both PA and BFS had a strong impact on the power of this spontaneous rhythm with the modulation pattern of beta power being identical across these two conditions. Specifically, both perceptual dominance and suppression of local neuronal populations in BFS were accompanied by a transient beta desynchronization followed by beta activity rebound, a pattern also observed when perception occurred without any underlying visual competition in PA. These results indicate that under control-free conditions, at least one rhythmic signal known to reflect control processes in the LPFC (i.e. beta oscillations) is not obstructed by local neuronal, and accordingly perceptual, suppression, thus being independent from temporally co-existing conscious and unconscious local neuronal representations. Future studies could reveal the additive effects of motor or cognitive control demands on prefrontal beta oscillations during conscious and unconscious processing. (shrink)
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  9. Yang Xu, Christopher D'Lauro, John A. Pyles, Robert E. Kass & Michael J. Tarr (2013). Fine-Grained Temporal Coding of Visually-Similar Categories in the Ventral Visual Pathway and Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Humans are remarkably proficient at categorizing visually-similar objects. To better understand the cortical basis of this categorization process, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record neural activity while participants learned--with feedback--to discriminate two highly-similar, novel visual categories. We hypothesized that although prefrontal regions would mediate early category learning, this role would diminish with increasing category familiarity and that regions within the ventral visual pathway would come to play a more prominent role in encoding category-relevant information as learning progressed. Early in (...)
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  10. Danilo Bzdok, Robert Langner, Leonhard Schilbach, Denis A. Engemann, Angela R. Laird, Peter T. Fox & Simon Eickhoff (2013). Segregation of the Human Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    While the human medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is widely believed to be a key node of neural networks relevant for socio-emotional processing, its functional subspecialization is still poorly understood. We thus revisited the often assumed differentiation of the mPFC in social cognition along its ventral-dorsal axis. Our neuroinformatic analysis was based on a neuroimaging meta-analysis of perspective-taking that yielded two separate clusters in the ventral and dorsal mPFC, respectively. We determined each seed region’s brain-wide interaction pattern by two (...)
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  11. Prefrontal Cortex (2002). The Structured Event Complex and the Human. In Donald T. Stuss & Robert T. Knight (eds.), Principles of Frontal Lobe Function. Oxford University Press. 292.score: 240.0
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  12. Arnaud D'Argembeau (2013). On the Role of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex in Self-Processing: The Valuation Hypothesis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    With the development of functional neuroimaging, important progress has been made in identifying the brain regions involved in self-related processing. One of the most consistent findings has been that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC) is activated when people contemplate various aspects of themselves and their life, such their traits, experiences, preferences, abilities, and goals. Recent evidence suggests that this region does not support the act of self-reflection per se, but its precise function in self-processing remains unclear. In this (...)
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  13. Bethany G. Edwards, Deanna M. Barch & Todd S. Braver (2010). Improving Prefrontal Cortex Function in Schizophrenia Through Focused Training of Cognitive Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 240.0
    Previous research has shown that individuals with schizophrenia show deficits in cognitive control functions thought to depend on the lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), and its interactions with related regions. The current study explored the effects of instructed strategy training on improving cognitive control functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Event-related fMRI was used to test whether effects of such training were associated with changes in brain activity dynamics during task performance. Patients with schizophrenia (N=22) performed the AX-CPT cognitive control (...)
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  14. Ute Kreplin & Stephen H. Fairclough (2013). Activation of the Rostromedial Prefrontal Cortex During the Experience of Positive Emotion in the Context of Aesthetic Experience. An fNIRS Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:879.score: 240.0
    The contemplation of visual art requires attention to be directed to external stimulus properties and internally generated thoughts. It has been proposed that the medial rostral prefrontal cortex (rPFC; BA10) plays a role in the maintenance of attention on external stimuli whereas the lateral area of the rPFC is associated with the preservation of attention on internal cognitions. An alternative hypothesis associates activation of medial rPFC with internal cognitions related to the self during emotion regulation. The aim of (...)
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  15. Christian Sorg Masoud Tahmasian, David C. Knight, Andrei Manoliu, Dirk Schwerthöffer, Martin Scherr, Chun Meng, Junming Shao, Henning Peters, Anselm Doll, Habibolah Khazaie, Alexander Drzezga, Josef Bäuml, Claus Zimmer, Hans Förstl, Afra M. Wohlschläger, Valentin Riedl (2013). Aberrant Intrinsic Connectivity of Hippocampus and Amygdala Overlap in the Fronto-Insular and Dorsomedial-Prefrontal Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Neuroimaging studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) have consistently observed functional and structural changes of the hippocampus (HP) and amygdale (AY). Thus, these brain regions appear to be critical elements of the pathophysiology of MDD. The HP and AY directly interact and show broad and overlapping intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) to other brain regions. Therefore, we hypothesized the HP and AY would show a corresponding pattern of aberrant intrinsic connectivity in MDD. Resting-state functional MRI was acquired from 21 patients with (...)
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  16. David H. Zald Michael T. Treadway, Joshua W. Buckholtz (2013). Perceived Stress Predicts Altered Reward and Loss Feedback Processing in Medial Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Stress is significant risk factor for the development of psychopathology, particularly symptoms related to reward processing. Importantly, individuals display marked variation in how they perceive and cope with stressful events, and such differences are strongly linked to risk for developing psychiatric symptoms following stress exposure. However, many questions remain regarding the neural architecture that underlies inter-subject variability in perceptions of stressors. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a monetary incentive delay paradigm, we examined the effects of self-reported perceived stress (...)
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  17. Massimo Turatto, Marco Sandrini & Carlo Miniussi (2004). The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Visual Change Awareness. Neuroreport 15 (16):2549-2552.score: 210.0
  18. A. Etkin, T. Egner & R. Kalisch (2011). Emotional Processing in Anterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):85-93.score: 210.0
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  19. Sara Basso Moro, Simone Cutini, Maria Laura Ursini, Marco Ferrari & Valentina Quaresima (2013). Prefrontal Cortex Activation During Story Encoding/Retrieval: A Multi-Channel Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  20. Christian Herff, Dominic Heger, Ole Fortmann, Johannes Hennrich, Felix Putze & Tanja Schultz (2014). Mental Workload During N-Back Task—Quantified in the Prefrontal Cortex Using fNIRS. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  21. A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio & S. W. Anderson (1993). Insensitivity to Future Consequences Following Damage to Human Prefrontal Cortex. Cognition 50 (1-3):7-15.score: 210.0
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  22. Tobias Grossmann, Eugenio Parise & Angela D. Friederici (2010). The Detection of Communicative Signals Directed at the Self in Infant Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 210.0
  23. Aron K. Barbey & Richard Patterson (2011). Architecture of Explanatory Inference in the Human Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 210.0
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  24. Hirokazu Doi, Shota Nishitani & Kazuyuki Shinohara (2013). NIRS as a Tool for Assaying Emotional Function in the Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  25. Tobias Grossmann (2013). The Role of Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Early Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  26. Rei Akaishi, Naoko Ueda & Katsuyuki Sakai (2013). Task-Related Modulation of Effective Connectivity During Perceptual Decision Making: Dissociation Between Dorsal and Ventral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  27. Annie W.-Y. Chan & Paul E. Downing (2011). Faces and Eyes in Human Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 210.0
  28. Pyungwon Kang, Jongbin Lee, Sunhae Sul & Hackjin Kim (2013). Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity Predicts the Accuracy in Estimating Others' Preferences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  29. Jonathan Smallwood, Krzysztof J. Gorgolewski, Johannes Golchert, Florence J. M. Ruby, Haakon Engen, Benjamin Baird, Melaina T. Vinski, Jonathan W. Schooler & Daniel S. Margulies (2013). The Default Modes of Reading: Modulation of Posterior Cingulate and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Connectivity Associated with Comprehension and Task Focus While Reading. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  30. K. G. Thompson & Jeffrey D. Schall (2000). Antecedents and Correlates of Visual Detectoin and Awareness in Macaque Prefrontal Cortex. Vision Research 40 (10):1523-38.score: 210.0
  31. Stephanie K. Riès, Kira Xie, Kathleen Y. Haaland, Nina F. Dronkers & Robert T. Knight (2013). Role of the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex in Speech Monitoring. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 192.0
    The role of lateral prefrontal cortex in speech monitoring has not been delineated. Recent work suggests that medial frontal cortex (MFC) is involved in overt speech monitoring initiated before auditory feedback. This mechanism is reflected in an event-related potential (ERP), the error negativity (Ne), peaking within 100 ms after vocal-onset. Critically, in healthy individuals the Ne is sensitive to the accuracy of the response; it is larger for error than correct trials. By contrast, patients with lateral (...) cortex (lPFC) damage are impaired in nonverbal monitoring tasks showing no amplitude difference between the Ne measured in correct vs. error trials. Interactions between the lPFC and the MFC are assumed to play a necessary role for normal action monitoring. We investigated whether the lPFC was involved in speech monitoring to the same extent as in non-linguistic actions by comparing performance and EEG activity in patients with lPFC damage and in aged-matched controls performing linguistic (Picture Naming) and non-linguistic (Simon) tasks. Controls did not produce enough errors to allow the comparison of the Ne or other ERP in error vs. correct trials. PFC patients had worse performance than controls in both tasks, but their Ne was larger for error than correct trials only in Naming. This task-dependent pattern can be explained by lPFC-dependent working-memory requirements present in non-linguistic tasks used to study action monitoring but absent in picture naming. This suggests that lPFC may not be necessary for speech monitoring as assessed by simple picture naming. In addition, bilateral temporal cortex activity starting before and peaking around vocal-onset was observed in lPFC and control groups in both tasks but was larger for error than correct trials only in Naming, suggesting the temporal cortex is associated with on-line monitoring of speech specifically when access to lexical representations is necessary. (shrink)
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  32. Alexander Heinzel & Georg Northoff (2009). Emotional Feeling and the Orbitomedial Prefrontal Cortex: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):443 – 464.score: 180.0
    Emotional feeling can be defined as the affective constituent of emotions representing a subjective experience such as, for example, feeling love or hate. Several recent neuroimaging studies have focused on this affective component of emotions thereby aiming to characterise the underlying neural correlates. These studies indicate that the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex is crucially involved in the processing of emotional feeling. It is the aim of this paper to analyse the extent to which the present state of the art (...)
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  33. Kai Vogeley, M. Moskopp Kurthen, P. Falkai & W. Maier (1999). Essential Functions of the Human Self Model Are Implemented in the Prefrontal Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):343-363.score: 180.0
    The human self model comprises essential features such as the experiences of ownership, of body-centered spatial perspectivity, and of a long-term unity of beliefs and attitudes. In the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, it is suggested that clinical subsyndromes like cognitive disorganization and derealization syndromes reflect disorders of this self model. These features are neurobiologically instantiated as an episodically active complex neural activation pattern and can be mapped to the brain, given adequate operationalizations of self model features. In its unique capability of (...)
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  34. D. Ben Shalom (2000). Developmental Depersonalization: The Prefrontal Cortex and Self-Functions in Autism. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):457-460.score: 180.0
    The human self model suggests that the construct of self involves functions such as agency, body-centered spatial perspectivity, and long-term unity. Vogeley, Kurthen, Falkai, and Maieret (1999) suggest that agency is subserved by the prefrontal cortex and other association areas of the cortex, spatial perspectivity by the prefrontal cortex and the parietal lobes, and long-term unity by the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobes and that all of these functions are impaired in schizophrenia. (...)
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  35. Georg Northoff & Alexander Heinzel (2009). Emotional Feeling and the Orbitomedial Prefrontal Cortex: Theoretical and Empirical Considerations. Philosophical Psychology 22 (4):443-464.score: 180.0
    Emotional feeling can be defined as the affective constituent of emotions representing a subjective experience such as, for example, feeling love or hate. Several recent neuroimaging studies have focused on this affective component of emotions thereby aiming to characterise the underlying neural correlates. These studies indicate that the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex is crucially involved in the processing of emotional feeling. It is the aim of this paper to analyse the extent to which the present state of the art (...)
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  36. Patrizia Turriziani, Daniela Smirni, Giuseppe Zappalà, Giuseppa R. Mangano, Massimiliano Oliveri & Lisa Cipolotti (2012). Enhancing Memory Performance with rTMS in Healthy Subjects and Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    A debated question in the literature is the degree of anatomical and functional lateralization of the executive control processes subserved by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during recognition memory retrieval. We investigated if transient inhibition and excitation of the left and right DLPFC at retrieval by means of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulate recognition memory performance in 100 healthy controls (HCs) and in 8 patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Recognition memory tasks of faces, buildings and words (...)
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  37. James A. Waltz, Barbara J. Knowlton & Keith J. Holyoak (1998). Relational Complexity, the Central Executive, and Prefrontal Cortex. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):846-847.score: 180.0
    Halford et al.'s analysis of relational complexity provides a possible framework for characterizing the symbolic functions of the prefrontal cortex. Studies of prefrontal patients have revealed that their performance is selectively impaired on tasks that require integration of two binary relations (i.e., tasks that Halford et al.'s analysis would identify as three-dimensional). Analyses of relational complexity show promise of helping to understand the neural substrate of thinking.
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  38. Naoyuki Osaka (2003). How Does the Attentional Pointer Work in Prefrontal Cortex? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):751-751.score: 180.0
    The current model, based on event-related potential (ERP) studies, posits that the working-memory system is a state of activated long-term memory; this appears comprehensive, but it needs further detailed analysis of functional neural connectivity analysis within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and between the posterior and prefrontal cortex. Specifically, the role of dorsolateral PFC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is probably critical for PFC's attentional controller. Neural implementation of the executive function in working memory appears critical (...)
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  39. Fabian Grabenhorst & Edmund T. Rolls (2011). Value, Pleasure and Choice in the Ventral Prefrontal Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):56-67.score: 180.0
    Rapid advances have recently been made in understanding how value-based decision-making processes are implemented in the brain. We integrate neuroeconomic and computational approaches with evidence on the neural correlates of value and experienced pleasure to describe how systems for valuation and decision-making are organized in the prefrontal cortex of humans and other primates. We show that the orbitofrontal and ventromedial prefrontal (VMPFC) cortices compute expected value, reward outcome and experienced pleasure for different stimuli on a common value (...)
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  40. Evgeniya Kirilina, Na Yu, Alexander Jelzow, Heidrun Wabnitz, Arthur M. Jacobs & Ilias Tachtsidis (2013). Identifying and Quantifying Main Components of Physiological Noise in Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy on Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:864.score: 180.0
    Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a promising method to study functional organization of the prefrontal cortex. However, in order to realize the high potential of fNIRS, effective discrimination between physiological noise originating from forehead skin haemodynamic and cerebral signals is required. Main sources of physiological noise are global and local blood flow regulation processes on multiple time scales. The goal of the present study was to identify the main physiological noise contributions in fNIRS forehead signals and to develop (...)
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  41. Corrina J. Frye, Hillary S. Schaefer & Andrew L. Alexander, Individual Differences in Amygdala and Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activity Are Associated with Evaluation Speed and Psychological Well-Being.score: 180.0
    & Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined whether individual differences in amygdala activation in response to negative relative to neutral information are related to differences in the speed with which such information is evaluated, the extent to which such differences are associated with medial prefrontal cortex function, and their relationship with measures of trait anxiety and psychological well-being (PWB). Results indicated that faster judgments of negative relative to neutral information were associated with increased left and right amygdala (...)
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  42. Elisa Ciaramelli & Giuseppe di Pellegrino (2011). Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex and the Future of Morality. Emotion Review 3 (3):308-309.score: 180.0
    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) is crucial for moral behavior, yet the mechanism through which the VMPFC promotes moral behavior remains unclear. In this article, we emphasize that moral choice is often intertemporal, requiring foregoing short-term gains in favor of future outcomes of larger value. We propose that the VMPFC may be necessary for mental time travel (MTT), a cognitive process enabling vivid preexperiencing of future outcomes. By providing anticipated outcomes that inform decisions, MTT may promote farsighted, moral (...)
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  43. Jack B. Nitschke Deborah L. Kerr, Donald G. McLaren, Robin M. Mathy (2012). Controllability Modulates the Anticipatory Response in the Human Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 180.0
    Research has consistently shown that control is critical to psychological functioning, with perceived lack of control considered to play a crucial role in the manifestation of symptoms in psychiatric disorders. In a model of behavioral control based on nonhuman animal work, Maier and colleagues posited that the presence of control activates areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which in turn inhibit the normative stress response in the dorsal raphe nucleus and amygdala. To test Maier’s model in humans, (...)
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  44. Lisa Cipolotti Patrizia Turriziani, Daniela Smirni, Giuseppe Zappalà, Giuseppa R. Mangano, Massimiliano Oliveri (2012). Enhancing Memory Performance with rTMS in Healthy Subjects and Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 180.0
    A debated question in the literature is the degree of anatomical and functional lateralization of the executive control processes subserved by the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during recognition memory retrieval. We investigated if transient inhibition and excitation of the left and right DLPFC at retrieval by means of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulate recognition memory performance in 100 healthy controls (HCs) and in 8 patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Recognition memory tasks of faces, buildings and words (...)
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  45. Joji Tsunada, Allison E. Baker, Kate L. Christison-Lagay, Selina J. Davis & Yale E. Cohen (2011). Modulation of Cross-Frequency Coupling by Novel and Repeated Stimuli in the Primate Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 180.0
    Adaptive behavior depends on an animal’s ability to ignore uninformative stimuli, such as repeated presentations of the same stimulus, and, instead, detect informative, novel stimuli in its environment. The primate prefrontal cortex (PFC) is known to play a central role in this ability. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the ability to differentiate between repeated and novel stimuli are not clear. We hypothesized that the coupling between different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) underlies the PFC’s role (...)
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  46. Michael W. Cole, Joset A. Etzel, Jeffrey M. Zacks, Walter Schneider & Todd S. Braver (2011). Rapid Transfer of Abstract Rules to Novel Contexts in Human Lateral Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 180.0
    Flexible, adaptive behavior is thought to rely on abstract rule representations within lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), yet it remains unclear how these representations provide such flexibility. We recently demonstrated that humans can learn complex novel tasks in seconds. Here we hypothesized that this impressive mental flexibility may be possible due to rapid transfer of practiced rule representations within LPFC to novel task contexts. We tested this hypothesis using functional MRI and multivariate pattern analysis, classifying LPFC activity patterns across (...)
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  47. Rogier B. Mars & Lennart Verhagen (2013). Book Review: Foraging with a Prefrontal Cortex Makes All the Difference. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 162.0
  48. Mark A. Elliott, Markus Conci & Hermann J. Müller (2003). Prefrontal Cortex and the Generation of Oscillatory Visual Persistence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):733-734.score: 156.0
    In this commentary, the formation of “pre-iconic” visual-prime persistence is described in the context of prime-specific, independent-component activation at prefrontal and posterior EEG-recording sites. Although this activity subserves neural systems that are near identical to those described by Ruchkin and colleagues, we consider priming to be a dynamic process, identified with patterns of coherence and temporal structure of very high precision.
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  49. Christopher D. Frith (1996). The Role of the Prefrontal Cortex in Self-Consciousness: The Case of Auditory Hallucinations. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 351:1505-12.score: 150.0
  50. Terrence W. Deacon (1996). Why a Brain Capable of Language Evolved Only Once: Prefrontal Cortex and Symbol Learning. Zygon 31 (4):635-670.score: 150.0
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