Search results for 'Prehistoric peoples' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    C. F. Keaby (1890). Schrader's Prehistoric Antiquities of the Aryan Peoples Prehistoric Antiquities of the Aryan Peoples, by Dr O. Schrader. Translated From the Second Edition by F. B. Jevons. (London:Charles Griffin & Co.). 21s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (09):419-421.
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  2. Gordon Cortis Baldwin (1964). Stone Age Peoples Today. New York, Norton.
     
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  3. Richard Bradley (2002). The Past in Prehistoric Societies.
     
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  4. Joseph Bernhart & Hugo Obermaier (1931). Sinn der Geschichte. Herder & Co. G. M. B. H.
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  5. Cyril Bibby (1938). The Evolution of Man and His Culture. London, V. Gollancz.
     
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  6.  17
    Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the quality of (...)
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  7.  1
    Stephen Duguid (2010). Nature in Modernity: Servant, Citizen, Queen or Comrade. Peter Lang.
    This is explored in a series of chapters that focus on our hunter-gatherer heritage, the shift to a more sedentary and agricultural life and the subsequent ...
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  8. Hans Fehlinger & S. Herbert (1921). Sexual Life of Primitive People. A. & C. Black.
     
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  9. Robert J. Jeske & Douglas K. Charles (eds.) (2003). Theory, Method, and Practice in Modern Archaeology. Praeger.
  10.  23
    Matthew R. Goodrum (2008). Questioning Thunderstones and Arrowheads: The Problem of Recognizing and Interpreting Stone Artifacts in the Seventeenth Century. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):482-508.
    Flint arrowheads, spearheads, and axe heads made by prehistoric Europeans were generally considered before the eighteenth century to be a naturally produced stone that formed in storm clouds and fell with lightning. These stones were called ceraunia, or thunderstones, and it was not until the sixteenth century that their status as a natural phenomenon was challenged. During the seventeenth century natural historians and antiquaries began to suggest that these ceraunia were not thunderstones but ancient human artifacts. I argue that (...)
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  11. Alice MacLachlan (2013). Government Apologies to Indigenous Peoples. In C. Allen Speight & Alice MacLachlan (eds.), Justice, Responsibility and Reconciliation in the Wake of Conflict. Springer 183-204.
    In this paper, I explore how theorists might navigate a course between the twin dangers of piety and excess cynicism when thinking critically about state apologies, by focusing on two government apologies to indigenous peoples: namely, those made by the Australian and Canadian Prime Ministers in 2008. Both apologies are notable for several reasons: they were both issued by heads of government, and spoken on record within the space of government: the national parliaments of both countries. Furthermore, in each (...)
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  12.  25
    David A. Lertzman & Harrie Vredenburg (2005). Indigenous Peoples, Resource Extraction and Sustainable Development: An Ethical Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (3):239 - 254.
    Resource extraction companies worldwide are involved with Indigenous peoples. Historically these interactions have been antagonistic, yet there is a growing public expectation for improved ethical performance of resource industries to engage with Indigenous peoples. (Crawley and Sinclair, Journal of Business Ethics 45, 361–373 (2003)) proposed an ethical model for human resource practices with Indigenous peoples in Australian mining companies. This paper expands on this work by re-framing the discussion within the context of sustainable development, extending it to (...)
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  13.  10
    Lantz Fleming Miller (2013). Rights of Self-Delimiting Peoples: Protecting Those Who Want No Part of Us. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (1):31-51.
    While in recent years new charters and government actions have boosted the collective and individual rights enjoyed by “Fourth-World” indigenous peoples such as the Inuit, another set of indigenous peoples has not experienced such protection: “self-delimiting” peoples. Their rights go largely unprotected because of deliberate ambiguities in the word “indigenous”; because these peoples generally avoid all contact with the larger society, and so are unknown by it and have no voice in it; and because charters and (...)
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  14.  87
    Mitchell Avila (2007). Defending a Law of Peoples: Political Liberalism and Decent Peoples. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (1):87 - 124.
    In this paper I reconstruct and defend John Rawls' The Law of Peoples, including the distinction between liberal and decent peoples. A “decent people” is defined as a people who possesses a comprehensive doctrine and uses that doctrine as the ground of political legitimacy, while liberal peoples do not possess a comprehensive doctrine. I argue that liberal and decent peoples are bound by the same normative requirements with the qualification that decent peoples accept the same (...)
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  15.  34
    Tarek Hayfa (2004). The Idea of Public Justification in Rawls's Law of Peoples. Res Publica 10 (3):233-246.
    The article examines Rawlss Law of Peoples as an attemptto extend the conception of public justification originallydeveloped in Political Liberalism to the internationaldomain. After briefly sketching the main elements of Rawlssconception of public justification, the article examineshow this is developed in Law of Peoples, pointingout the main differences with the domestic case. The articlethen tries to show that Rawlss justificatory strategy containsa number of inconsistencies which undermine the persuasivenessof the conception of international justice he advocates. Thisin turn can (...)
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  16.  33
    Burleigh T. Wilkins (2007). Principles for the Law of Peoples. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):161 - 175.
    In The Law of Peoples John Rawls gives a list of eight principles for the law of peoples. I argue that the force of the principles depends in large part upon their being lexically ordered, and I attempt such an ordering. However, the lexically ordered list makes it clear that the duty of non-intervention obtains only after the duty to honor human rights is satisfied. Also, I point to certain “practical” difficulties with intervention on behalf of human rights. (...)
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  17.  5
    William Farfán Moreno (2010). La posición original de The Law of Peoples de John Rawls como postura etnocéntrica rortiana. Logos 17:115-131.
    John Rawls’ main purpose in The Law of Peoples is to extend his social contract theory to the peoples’ society, establishing the general principles that should be accepted by liberal and non-liberal societies, regulating the relationships between peoples. This paper pretends to analyze and demonstrate that Rawls’ law of peoples is considered to be an ethnocentrically theory, and therefore, difficult as a regular proposal for today’s world.
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  18.  15
    David A. Freedman & William Wang (1996). Language Polygenesis: A Probabilistic Model. Philosophical Explorations.
    Monogenesis of language is widely accepted, but the conventional argument seems to be mistaken; a simple probabilistic model shows that polygenesis is likely. Other prehistoric inventions are discussed, as are problems in tracing linguistic lineages. Language is a system of representations; within such a system, words can evoke complex and systematic responses. Along with its social functions, language is important to humans as a mental instrument. Indeed, the invention of language,that is the accumulation of symbols to represent emotions, objects, (...)
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  19.  4
    Robert W. Glover (2011). Eyes Wide Shut: The Curious Silence of The Law of Peoples on Questions of Immigration and Citizenship. Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 14:10-49.
    In an interdependent world of overlapping political memberships and identities, states and democratic citizens face difficult choices in responding to large-scale migration and the related question of who ought to have access to citizenship. In an influential attempt to provide a normative framework for a more just global order, The Law of Peoples , John Rawls is curiously silent regarding what his framework would mean for the politics of migration. In this piece, I consider the complications Rawls’s inattention to (...)
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  20.  8
    Keith F. Otterbein (1997). The Origins of War. Critical Review 11 (2):251-277.
    In War Before Civilization, Lawrence H. Keeley argues that prehistoric as well as primitive mankind was more warlike than has been recognized by most scholars. Such scholars subscribe, according to Keeley, to?the myth of the peaceful savage,? the subtitle of his book. But Keeley, who leads a long list of Hawks, has replaced this myth with another, the?myth of the warlike savage.? Anthropologists who argue that serious warfare arose only after the rise of the state and civilization understate the (...)
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  21.  1
    Lina Laurinavičiūtė (2013). Peoples”: The Perspective of International Public Law. Jurisprudence 20 (1):91-118.
    The article deals with the application rationae personae of the right to selfdetermination. Relying on the existing international legal framework, decisions of the judicial bodies and doctrine, the author analyses conceivable beneficiaries of the above-mentioned right: the inhabitants of Trust and Non-Self-Governing territories, peoples under foreign occupation, the entire population of a state and subgroups within a state.
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  22.  50
    Hisashi Nakao, Kohei Tamura, Yui Arimatsu, Tomomi Nakagawa, Naoko Matsumoto & Takehiko Matsugi (2016). Violence in the Prehistoric Period of Japan: The Spatio-Temporal Pattern of Skeletal Evidence for Violence in the Jomon Period. Biology Letters 12:20160028.
    Whether man is predisposed to lethal violence, ranging from homicide to warfare, and how that may have impacted human evolution, are among the most controversial topics of debate on human evolution. Although recent studies on the evolution of warfare have been based on various archaeological and ethnographic data, they have reported mixed results: it is unclear whether or not warfare among prehistoric hunter–gatherers was common enough to be a component of human nature and a selective pressure for the evolution (...)
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  23.  60
    John Rawls (1999). The Law of Peoples. Harvard University Press.
    Consisting of two essays, this work by a Harvard professor offers his thoughts on the idea of a social contract regulating people's behavior toward one another.
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  24. Philip Pettit (2010). A Republican Law of Peoples. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (1):70-94.
    Assuming that states will remain a permanent feature of our world, what is the ideal that we should hold out for the international order? An attractive proposal is that those peoples that are already organized under non-dominating, representative states should pursue a twin goal: first, arrange things so that they each enjoy the republican ideal of freedom as non-domination in relation to one another and to other multi-national and international agencies; and second, do everything possible and productive to facilitate (...)
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  25.  89
    M. Dodson & R. Williamson (1999). Indigenous Peoples and the Morality of the Human Genome Diversity Project. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):204-208.
    In addition to the aim of mapping and sequencing one human's genome, the Human Genome Project also intends to characterise the genetic diversity of the world's peoples. The Human Genome Diversity Project raises political, economic and ethical issues. These intersect clearly when the genomes under study are those of indigenous peoples who are already subject to serious economic, legal and/or social disadvantage and discrimination. The fact that some individuals associated with the project have made dismissive comments about indigenous (...)
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  26.  6
    Catherine Lu (2009). Political Friendship Among Peoples. Journal of International Political Theory 5 (1):41-58.
    Does the concept of political friendship make sense, and does cultivating political friendship among peoples strengthen universal peace? This article provides an Aristotelian account of political friendship as distinct from but analogous to personal friendship. Political friendships, founded on mutual recognition and respect, are characterized by consensual agreement about the fundamental terms of cooperation. While promoting such political friendship at the global level would be a measure to strengthen universal peace, another form of friendship, politicized friendship, is to be (...)
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  27. Samuel Freeman (2006). The Law of Peoples, Social Cooperation, Human Rights, and Distributive Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):29-68.
    Cosmopolitans argue that the account of human rights and distributive justice in John Rawls's The Law of Peoples is incompatible with his argument for liberal justice. Rawls should extend his account of liberal basic liberties and the guarantees of distributive justice to apply to the world at large. This essay defends Rawls's grounding of political justice in social cooperation. The Law of Peoples is drawn up to provide principles of foreign policy for liberal peoples. Human rights are (...)
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  28.  13
    H. M. Buiting, D. J. H. Deeg, D. L. Knol, J. P. Ziegelmann, H. R. W. Pasman, G. A. M. Widdershoven & B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (2012). Older Peoples' Attitudes Towards Euthanasia and an End-of-Life Pill in The Netherlands: 2001-2009. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):267-273.
    Introduction With an ageing population, end-of-life care is increasing in importance. The present work investigated characteristics and time trends of older peoples' attitudes towards euthanasia and an end-of-life pill. Methods Three samples aged 64 years or older from the Longitudinal Ageing Study Amsterdam (N=1284 (2001), N=1303 (2005) and N=1245 (2008)) were studied. Respondents were asked whether they could imagine requesting their physician to end their life (euthanasia), or imagine asking for a pill to end their life if they became (...)
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  29. Gillian Brock (2010). Recent Work on Rawls's Law of Peoples: Critics Versus Defenders. American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):85.
    There is much current and growing interest in theorizing about global justice. Contemporary events in the world probably account for most of this, but if any philosophical text can be identified as igniting theorists' relatively newly found interest, it must be John Rawls's influential book, The Law of Peoples . There is a lively debate between critics and advocates of Rawls's approach, and much theorizing about global justice is framed in terms of that exchange. Because of its enormous influence (...)
     
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  30. Andrea Smith (2003). Not an Indian Tradition: The Sexual Colonization of Native Peoples. Hypatia 18 (2):70-85.
    : This paper analyzes the connections between sexual violence and colonialism in the lives and histories of Native peoples in the United States. This paper argues that sexual violence does not simply just occur within the process of colonialism, but that colonialism is itself structured by the logic of sexual violence. Furthermore, this logic of sexual violence continues to structure U. S. policies toward Native peoples today. Consequently, anti-sexual violence and anti-colonial struggles cannot be separated.
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  31.  15
    Glen S. Coulthard (2007). Subjects of Empire: Indigenous Peoples and the |[Lsquo]|Politics of Recognition|[Rsquo]| in Canada. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (4):437.
    Over the last 30 years, the self-determination efforts and objectives of Indigenous peoples in Canada have increasingly been cast in the language of 'recognition' — recognition of cultural distinctiveness, recognition of an inherent right to self-government, recognition of state treaty obligations, and so on. In addition, the last 15 years have witnessed a proliferation of theoretical work aimed at fleshing out the ethical, legal and political significance of these types of claims. Subsequently, 'recognition' has now come to occupy a (...)
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  32. Uwe Steinhoff (2012). Unsavory Implications of a Theory of Justice and the Law of Peoples: The Denial of Human Rights and the Justification of Slavery. Philosophical Forum 43 (2):175-196.
    Many philosophers have criticized John Rawls’s Law of Peoples. However, often these criticisms take it for granted that the moral conclusions drawn in A Theory of Justice are superior to those in the former book. In my view, however, Rawls comes to many of his 'conclusions' without too many actual inferences. More precisely, my argument here is that if one takes Rawls’s premises and the assumptions made about the original position(s) seriously and does in fact think them through to (...)
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  33.  54
    Iván Carrasco M. (2013). Peoples of sea by Recasens: Between Ethnography and Literature. Alpha (Osorno) 37:45-58.
    Pueblos de mar. Relatos etnográficos es un libro singular que forma parte de una clase de textos ambivalentes entre la escritura etnográfica y la literatura antropológica, género nuevo en las letras chilenas paralelo a la llamada antropología poética. Esta condición depende de los diversos metatextos que lo conforman en gran parte, tales como el título, subtítulo, prólogo, estructura y especificidades textuales, que reconocen expresamente su plural condición de texto etnográfico y literario. Al mismo tiempo, su narración referencial se mezcla con (...)
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  34.  65
    Martha Nussbaum (2002). Women and the Law of Peoples. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (3):283-306.
    John Rawls argues, in The Law of Peoples , that a principle of toleration requires the international community to respect `decent hierarchical societies' that obey certain minimal human rights norms. In this article, I question that line of argument, using women's inequality as a lens. I show that Rawls's principle would require us to treat the very same practices of the very same entity differently if it happens to set up as an independent nation rather than a state within (...)
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  35.  4
    Bette Jacobs, Jason Roffenbender, Jeff Collmann, Kate Cherry, LeManuel Lee Bitsói, Kim Bassett & Charles H. Evans (2010). Bridging the Divide Between Genomic Science and Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):684-696.
    The new science of genomics endeavors to chart the genomes of individuals around the world, with the dual goals of understanding the role genetic factors play in human health and solving problems of disease and disability. From the perspective of indigenous peoples and developing countries, the promises and perils of genomic science appear against a backdrop of global health disparity and political vulnerability. These conditions pose a dilemma for many communities when attempting to decide about participating in (...) research or any other biomedical research. Genomic research offers the possibility of improved technologies for managing the acute and chronic diseases that plague their members. Yet, the history of particularly biomedical research among people in indigenous and developing nations offers salient examples of unethical practice, misuse of data, and failed promises. This dilemma creates risks for communities who decide either to participate or not to participate in genomic science research. Some argue that the history of poor scientific practice justifies refusal to join genomic research projects. Others argue that disease poses such great threats to the well-being of people in indigenous communities and developing nations that not participating in genomic research risks irrevocable harm. Thus, some communities particularly among indigenous peoples have declined to participate as subjects in genomic research. At the same time, some communities have begun developing new guidelines, procedures, and practices for engaging with the scientific community that offer opportunities to bridge the gap between genomic science and indigenous and/or developing communities. Four new approaches warrant special attention and further support: consulting with local communities; negotiating the complexities of consent; training members of local communities in science and health care; and training scientists to work with indigenous communities. Implicit is a new definition of “rigorous scientific research,” one that includes both community development and scientific progress as legitimate objectives of genomic research. Innovative translational research is needed to develop practical, mutually acceptable methods for crossing the divide between genomic researchers and indigenous communities. This may mean the difference between success and failure in genomic science, and in improving health for all peoples. (shrink)
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  36.  11
    Ryan Hurd (2011). Integral Archaeology: Process Methodologies for Exploring Prehistoric Rock Art on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):72-94.
    A process-based approach to archaeology combines traditional third-person data collection methods with first- and second-person inquiries. Drawing from the traditions of cognitive archaeology, transpersonal psychology, and ecopsychology, this mixed-methods approach can be thought of as a movement toward a more holistic or “integral” archaeology. By way of example, a prehistoric rock art site on Ometepe Island, Nicaragua is explored from the inside (through the researcher's lucid dreaming incubations) as well as in relationship with the researcher's embodied presence (an (...)
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  37.  13
    Edmund N. Santurri (2005). Global Justice After the Fall Christian Realism and the “Law of Peoples”. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (4):783-814.
    In "The Law of Peoples" John Rawls casts his proposals as an argument against what he calls "political realism." Here, I contend that a certain version of "Christian political realism" survives Rawls's polemic against political realism sans phrase and that Rawls overstates his case against political realism writ large. Specifically, I argue that Rawls's dismissal of "empirical political realism" is underdetermined by the evidence he marshals in support of the dismissal and that his rejection of "normative political realism" (...)
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  38.  27
    Marţian Iovan (2010). The Role of Spiritual Values and Beliefs in the Historical Development of Peoples. Cultura 7 (1):150-166.
    An extremely profound knower of the history of the Romanian people and of humankind as a whole, Vasile Goldiş brought an original contribution to the development of philosophy of history. In this respect, without having attempted to write a treatise or to work out a systematic body of work in the field, he discovered objective grounds or “natural laws” determining the evolution lines for historical events, analyzed the relation between trends in lawmaking and the unifying force of spiritual values, expressed (...)
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  39.  13
    Robert Lee Nichols (2005). Realizing the Social Contract: The Case of Colonialism and Indigenous Peoples. Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):42.
    From 1922 to 1924, the Iroquois Confederacy — a federal union of six aboriginal nations — sought resolution of a dispute between themselves and Canada at the League of Nations. In this paper, the historical events of the 1920s League are employed as a case study to explore the development of the international society of states in the early 20th century as it relates to the indigenous peoples of North America. Specifically, it will be argued that the early modern (...)
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  40. Kok-Chor Tan (2006). The Problem of Decent Peoples. In Rex Martin & David Reidy (eds.), Rawls's Law of Peoples: A Realistic Utopia? Blackwell
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  41.  82
    Chris Brown (2000). John Rawls, "the Law of Peoples," and International Political Theory. Ethics and International Affairs 14 (1):125–132.
    "The Law of Peoples" has been extended into a monograph with the same title,which is the main focus of this essay. Brown includes a sketch of Rawls’s project as a whole as a necessary preliminary.
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  42.  3
    Michael S. Alvard (1994). Conservation by Native Peoples. Human Nature 5 (2):127-154.
    Native peoples have often been portrayed as natural conservationists, living a “balanced” existence with nature. It is argued that this perspective is a result of an imprecise operational definition of conservation. Conservation is defined here in contrast to the predictions of foraging theory, which assumes that foragers will behave to maximize their short-term harvesting rate. A behavior is deemed conservation when a short-term cost is paid by the resource harvester in exchange for long-term benefits in the form of sustainable (...)
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  43.  10
    Brij Kothari (2002). Theoretical Streams in Marginalized Peoples' Knowledge(S): Systems, Asystems, and Subaltern Knowledge(S). [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 19 (3):225-237.
    Two distinct theoreticalstreams flowing in the investigation,documentation, and dissemination ofMarginalized Peoples' Knowledge(s) (MPK)are identified and a third suggested.Systems thinking, which originally coined theterm Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS),continues to predominate the growinginterdisciplinary interest in MPK. Thisapproach has tended to view knowledge or itsproduction based on systemic principles.The asystems approach challenges theusefulness of MPK as a systemsconstruct. Its central proposition is that MPKdoes not always represent a coherent system ofknowledge with underlying principles.Asystemists tend to prefer the term LocalKnowledge (LK) and approach (...)
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  44.  3
    Milorad Stupar (2004). Voluntary League of Peoples Vs. Coercive World Federative State of Peoples as States: Kant's and Rawls' Considerations Concerning International Relations: Similarities And. Filozofija I Društvo 25:9-25.
    Although similar in some respects, Rawls' and Kant' visions of world order fall apart on the question of sovereignty. Rawls never advocates of an international single state with international authority. Kant, on the other hand, inspired by the project of Enlightenment, as a final form of international sovereignty sees federative state of states as a provider for eternal peace among peoples.
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  45.  58
    Brian E. Butler (2001). There Are Peoples and There Are Peoples: A Critique of Rawls' Law of Peoples. Florida Philosophical Review 1 (2):1-24.
    In this paper, I aim to show that the arguments offered and conclusions at which Rawls aims in his book, The Law of Peoples, are telling as to the intellectual legitimacy of his larger theoretical project. To show this I first investigate how (1) non-liberal peoples fit within the limitations Rawls describes in The Law of Peoples and (2) how liberal peoples would react to such rules. I argue from the answers to these questions to the (...)
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  46.  20
    Lynda Lange (1998). Burnt Offerings to Rationality: A Feminist Reading of the Construction of Indigenous Peoples in Enrique Dussel's Theory of Modernity. Hypatia 13 (3):132 - 145.
    The philosopher Enrique Dussel offers a critical analysis of European construction of indigenous peoples which he calls "transmodern." His theory is especially relevant to feminist and other concerns about the potential disabling effects of postmodern approaches for political action and the development of theory. Dussel divides modernity into two concurrent paradigms. Reflection on them suggests that modernism and postmodernism should not be too strongly distinguished. In conclusion, his approach is compared with that of Mohanty.
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  47.  16
    Marta Soniewicka (2008). The Problem of Global Distributive Justice in Rawls's The Law of Peoples. Diametros 17:45-59.
    The essay "The Problem of Global Distributive Justice in The Law of Peoples by John Rawls" is concerned with the question of distributive claims of justice in the global realm. The conception of international justice developed by John Rawls in his book The Law of Peoples offers a very limited kind of distribution of goods beyond state borders, where the matter of the distribution of wealth is restricted to a single state. The Rawlsian point of view is frequently (...)
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  48.  2
    Mervyn L. Tano (2006). Interrelationships Among Native Peoples, Genetic Research, and the Landscape: Need for Further Research Into Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (2):301-309.
    To understand the impacts of development on native peoples requires an understanding of how their genetic make-up is implicated in their relationship with their landscapes. This is an area ripe for more research. The ASLME project on DNA Fingerprinting and Civil Liberties proposed improvements to the ethical and legal safeguards for the collection and storage of DNA-derived genetic information. Native peoples have proposed a similar examination of the ethical and legal issues related to the collection and storage of (...)
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  49.  16
    H. Kim (2015). A Stability Interpretation of Rawls's The Law of Peoples. Political Theory 43 (4):473-499.
    In this essay, I propose an interpretation of John Rawls’s The Law of Peoples that puts the stability of liberal societies as the central organizing idea of its principles. I start by critically examining other interpretations currently found in the literature. I observe two characteristics of Rawls’s conception of stability from his political turn: stability for the right reasons and in the right way. In the main body of the essay, I argue that the absence of a global egalitarian (...)
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  50.  44
    Mark F. N. Franke (2007). Self-Determination Versus the Determination of Self: A Critical Reading of the Colonial Ethics Inherent to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3):359 – 379.
    The United Nations' (UN) adoption of a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is intended to mark a fundamental ethical turn in the relationships between indigenous peoples and the community of sovereign states. This moment is the result of decades of discussion and negotiation, largely revolving around states' discomfort with notion of indigenous self-determination. Member states of the UN have feared that an ethic of indigenous self-determination would undermine the principles of state sovereignty on which the UN (...)
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