Search results for 'Priest Stephen' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Stephen Priest (1998). Merleau-Ponty. Routledge.score: 540.0
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty was the first French thinker to identify phenomenology with philosophy. He is known and celebrated as a renowned phenomenologist and was identified as a key figure in the existential movement. In his wide-ranging and penetrative study, Stephen Priest engages Merleau-Ponty across the full range of his thought. He considers Merleau-Ponty's writings on the problems of the body, perception, space, time, subjectivity. freedom, language, other minds, physical objects, art and being. Priest uses clear and direct language (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stephen Priest (2000). The Subject in Question: Sartre's Critique of Husserl in the Transcendence of the Ego. Routledge.score: 540.0
    The Subject in Question provides a fascinating insight into a debate between two of the twentieth century's most famous philosophers over the key notions of conscious experience and the self. Edmund Husserl, the father of phenomenology, argued that the unity of one's own consciousness depends on the "transcendental ego," an irreducible, essential self not available to ordinary consciousness. But in The Transcendence of the Ego , Jean-Paul Sartre launched a sustained attack on Husserl's doctrine and argued that the self is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Roger Gallie & Stephen Priest (1991). The British Empiricists. Philosophical Quarterly 41 (163):260.score: 540.0
    The Empiricists represent the central tradition in British philosophy as well as some of the most important and influential thinkers in human history. Their ideas paved the way for modern thought from politics to science, ethics to religion. The British Empiricists is a wonderfully clear and concise introduction to the lives, careers and views of Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Mill, Russell, and Ayer. Stephen Priest examines each philosopher and their views on a wide range of topics including mind (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Stephen Priest (1981). Descartes, Kant, and Self-Consciousness. Philosophical Quarterly 31 (125):348-351.score: 300.0
    Descartes maintained the doctrine attacked by hume and kant that the self is substance. Consciousness does not entail self-Consciousness for kant. The "i think" must be "capable" of accompanying my thoughts but does not constantly do so. What is necessarily true is that if I have an experience then it is mine, Not that I am conscious of it as mine. Pure apperception is a formal condition for experience, Not as a sort of introspection.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Stephen Priest (2007). The Problem of Evil – Peter Van Inwagen. Philosophical Quarterly 57 (229):696–698.score: 300.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Stephen Priest (2000). Merleau-Ponty's Concept of the Body-Subject. Nursing Philosophy 1 (2):173–174.score: 300.0
  7. Stephen Priest (ed.) (1987). Hegel's Critique of Kant. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    Despite the rapid growth of interest in Hegel among English-speaking philosophers, surprisingly little has been directed at Hegel's relationship toward Kant. This collection of essays by eleven eminent philosophers meets this deficiency by critically examining Hegel's attitude to Kant over a wide range of issues: the nature of space and time; the possibility of metaphysics, categories, and things-in-themselves; dialectic and the self; moral and political philosophy; aesthetics; the philosophy of history, and teleology. All the essays provide channels to a fuller (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stephen Priest (1998). Duns Scotus on the Immaterial. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (192):370-372.score: 300.0
    In _De Spiritualitate et Immortalitate Animae Humanae Scotus distinguishes three senses of 'immaterial': x is immaterial if x depends upon nothing material, x is immaterial if x is unextended, x is immaterial if x is abstract. Pace Scotus: depending on nothing material is neither necessary nor sufficient for being immaterial, being unextended is not necessary but is sufficient for being immaterial, and being abstract is not necessary but is sufficient for being immaterial. The idea of immaterial existence is not incoherent. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Stephen Priest (2000). Taking Merleau-Ponty Literally: Reply to Dermot Moran. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 8 (2):247 – 251.score: 300.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Stephen Priest (1984). A Point of Dispute About Hegel's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 24 (2):166-167.score: 300.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stephen Priest (2000). Reality and Existence in Anselm. Heythrop Journal 41 (4):461–462.score: 300.0
  12. Stephen Priest (1991). Theories of the Mind. Penguin Books.score: 300.0
  13. Stephen Priest (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 104 (413):166-168.score: 300.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen Priest (1986). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (1):166-168.score: 300.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Stephen Priest (1999). Husserl's Concept of Being: From Phenomenology to Metaphysics. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 44:209-222.score: 300.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Stephen Priest (1998). Reid's Concept of Identity. Reid Studies 1 (2):49-57.score: 300.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Stephen Priest (2006). Radical Internalism. In Anthony Freeman (ed.), Radical Externalism: Honderich's Theory of Consciousness Discussed. Exeter: Imprint Academic. 147-164.score: 300.0
  18. Stephen Priest (1987). Subjectivity and Objectivity in Kant and Hegel. In , Hegel's Critique of Kant. Oxford University Press. 103--18.score: 300.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stephen Priest (1990). The British Empiricists: Hobbes to Ayer. Viking Penguin.score: 300.0
  20. Graham Priest & Stephen Read (1980). Merely Confused Supposition. Franciscan Studies 40 (1):265-97.score: 240.0
    In this article, we discuss the notion of merely confused supposition as it arose in the medieval theory of suppositio personalis. The context of our analysis is our formalization of William of Ockham's theory of supposition sketched in Mind 86 (1977), 109-13. The present paper is, however, self-contained, although we assume a basic acquaintance with supposition theory. The detailed aims of the paper are: to look at the tasks that supposition theory took on itself and to use our formalization to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Graham Priest & Stephen Read (2004). Intentionality: Meinongianism and the Medievals. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):421 – 442.score: 240.0
    Intentional verbs create three different problems: problems of non-existence, of indeterminacy, and of failure of substitutivity. Meinongians tackle the first problem by recognizing non-existent objects; so too did many medieval logicians. Meinongians and the medievals approach the problem of indeterminacy differently, the former diagnosing an ellipsis for a propositional complement, the latter applying their theory directly to non-propositional complements. The evidence seems to favour the Meinongian approach. Faced with the third problem, Ockham argued bluntly for substitutivity when the intentional complement (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Priest Stephen (2006). Radical Internalism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (s 7-8):147-174.score: 240.0
    Honderich claims that for a person to be perceptually conscious is for a world to exist. I decide what this means, and whether it could be true, in the opening section Consciousness and Existence. In Honderich's Phenomenology, I show that Honderich's theory is essentially anticipated in the ideas and Ideas of Husserl. In the third section, Radical Interiority, I argue that although phenomenology putatively eschews ontology of mind, and Honderich construes his position as near- physicalism, Honderich's insights are only truths (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Graham Priest & Stephen Read (1977). The Formalization of Ockham's Theory of Supposition. Mind 86 (341):109-113.score: 240.0
  24. Graham Priest & Stephen Read (1981). Ockham's Rejection of Ampliation. Mind 90 (358):274-279.score: 240.0
  25. Kenneth Campbell, Stephen Banning, Hilary Fussell Sisco, Susanna Priest & Karen Taylor (2011). Reading Hurricane Katrina: Information Sources and Decision-Making in Response to a Natural Disaster. Social Epistemology 23 (3):361-380.score: 240.0
    In this paper we analyze results from 114 face-to-face qualitative interviews of people who had evacuated from the New Orleans area in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, interviews that were completed within weeks of the 2005 storm in most cases. Our goal was to understand the role information and knowledge played in people's decisions to leave the area. Contrary to the conventional wisdom underlying many disaster communication studies, we found that our interviewees almost always had extensive storm-related information from a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Karen Taylor, Susanna Priest, Hilary Fussell Sisco, Stephen Banning & Kenneth Campbell (2009). Reading Hurricane Katrina: Information Sources and Decision-Making in Response to a Natural Disaster. Social Epistemology 23 (3):361-380.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. James Tartaglia (2001). Stephen Priest, Merleau-Ponty. Noûs 35 (2):317–323.score: 120.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. H. S. Harris (1988). Stephen Priest, Ed., Hegel's Critique of Kant Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (3):107-109.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Benedikt Paul Göcke (ed.) (2012). After Physicalism. The University of Notre Dame Press.score: 24.0
    Although physicalism has been the dominant position in recent work in the philosophy of mind, this dominance has not prevented a small but growing number of philosophers from arguing that physicalism is untenable for several reasons: both ontologically and epistemologically it cannot reduce mentality to the realm of the physical, and its attempts to reduce subjectivity to objectivity have thoroughly failed. The contributors to After Physicalism provide powerful alternatives to the physicalist account of the human mind from a dualistic point (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Daan Evers (2013). Weight for Stephen Finlay. Philosophical Studies 163 (3):737-749.score: 24.0
    According to Stephen Finlay, ‘A ought to X’ means that X-ing is more conducive to contextually salient ends than relevant alternatives. This in turn is analysed in terms of probability. I show why this theory of ‘ought’ is hard to square with a theory of a reason’s weight which could explain why ‘A ought to X’ logically entails that the balance of reasons favours that A X-es. I develop two theories of weight to illustrate my point. I first look (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jean-Paul Sartre (2001). Jean-Paul Sartre: Basic Writings. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Jean-Paul Sartre is one of the most famous philosophers of the twentieth century. The principal founder of existentialism, a political thinker and famous novelist and dramatist, his work has exerted enormous influence in philosophy, literature, politics and cultural studies. Jean-Paul Sartre: Basic Writings is the first collection of Sartre's key philosophical writings and provides an indispensable resource for readers of his work. Stephen Priest's clear and helpful introductions make the volume an ideal companion to those coming to Sartre's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Stephen Jay Gould. In T. Flynn (ed.), The New Encyclopedia of Unbelief. Prometheus.score: 24.0
    A brief biography of evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jürgen Dümont & Frank Mau (1998). Are There True Contradictions? A Critical Discussion of Graham Priest's, Beyond the Limits of Thought. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 29 (2):289-299.score: 24.0
    The present article critically examines three aspects of Graham Priest's dialetheic analysis of very important kinds of limitations (the limit of what can be expressed, described, conceived, known, or the limit of some operation or other). First, it is shown that Priest's considerations focusing on Hegel's account of the infinite cannot be sustained, mainly because Priest seems to rely on a too restrictive notion of object. Second, we discuss Priest's treatment of the paradoxes in Cantorian set-theory. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Katrina L. Sifferd (forthcoming). What Does It Mean to Be a Mechanism? Stephen Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.score: 24.0
    Stephen Morse seems to have adopted a controversial position regarding the mindbody relationship: John Searle’s non-reductivism, which claims that conscious mental states are causal yet not reducible to their underlying brain states. Searle’s position has been roundly criticized, with some arguing the theory taken as a whole is incoherent. In this paper I review these criticisms and add my own, concluding that Searle’s position is indeed contradictory, both internally and with regard to Morse's other views. Thus I argue that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Thomas Macaulay Ferguson (2014). Extensions of Priest-da Costa Logic. Studia Logica 102 (1):145-174.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we look at applying the techniques from analyzing superintuitionistic logics to extensions of the cointuitionistic Priest-da Costa logic daC (introduced by Graham Priest as “da Costa logic”). The relationship between the superintuitionistic axioms- definable in daC- and extensions of Priest-da Costa logic (sdc-logics) is analyzed and applied to exploring the gap between the maximal si-logic SmL and classical logic in the class of sdc-logics. A sequence of strengthenings of Priest-da Costa logic is examined (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jamie Iredell (2011). Belief: An Essay. Continent 1 (4).score: 24.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like Jesus, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stephen Makin (2000). Aristotle on Modality: Stephen Makin. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):143-161.score: 21.0
    [Stephen Makin] Aristotle draws two sets of distinctions in Metaphysics 9.2, first between non-rational and rational capacities, and second between one way and two way capacities. He then argues for three claims: [A] if a capacity is rational, then it is a two way capacity [B] if a capacity is non-rational, then it is a one way capacity [C] a two way capacity is not indifferently related to the opposed outcomes to which it can give rise I provide explanations (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Aaron Allen Schiller (2009). Colorblindness and Black Friends in Stephen Colbert’s America. In , Stephen Colbert and Philosophy. Open Court.score: 21.0
    Is there a contradiction in Stephen Colbert’s attitudes towards race? How can he consistently claim to be colorblind and yet hold a national search for a new "black friend"? I argue that Stephen is trying to claim rights and shirk responsibilities on matters of race relations in America, and that his famous notion of "truthiness" is an extension of this attitude to other areas of social and political discourse.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Kent Emery, Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer, Maxime Mauriege & Stephen F. Brown (eds.) (2011). Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown. Brill.score: 21.0
    The title of this Festschrift to Stephen Brown points to the understanding of medieval philosophy and theology in the longue durée of their traditions and discourses.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Graham Oppy (1995). Professor William Craig's Criticisms of Critiques of Kalam Cosmological Arguments By Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking, and Adolf Grunbaum. Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):237-250.score: 18.0
    Kalam cosmological arguments have recently been the subject of criticisms, at least inter alia, by physicists---Paul Davies, Stephen Hawking---and philosophers of science---Adolf Grunbaum. In a series of recent articles, William Craig has attempted to show that these criticisms are “superficial, iII-conceived, and based on misunderstanding.” I argue that, while some of the discussion of Davies and Hawking is not philosophically sophisticated, the points raised by Davies, Hawking and Grunbaum do suffice to undermine the dialectical efficacy of kalam cosmological arguments.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Eric Dietrich (2008). The Bishop and Priest: Toward a Point-of-View Based Epistemology of True Contradictions. Logos Architekton 2 (2):35-58..score: 18.0
    True contradictions are taken increasingly seriously by philosophers and logicians. Yet, the belief that contradictions are always false remains deeply intuitive. This paper confronts this belief head-on by explaining in detail how one specific contradiction is true. The contradiction in question derives from Priest's reworking of Berkeley's argument for idealism. However, technical aspects of the explanation offered here differ considerably from Priest's derivation. The explanation uses novel formal and epistemological tools to guide the reader through a valid argument (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Heinrich Wansing (2006). Contradiction and Contrariety. Priest on Negation. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 91 (1):81-93.score: 18.0
    Although it is not younger than other areas of non-classical logic, paraconsistent logic has received full recognition only in recent years, largely due to the work of, among others, Newton da Costa, Graham Priest, Diderik Batens, and Jerzy Perzanowski. A logical system Λ is paraconsistent if there is a set of Λ-formulas Δ ∪ { A } such that (i) in Λ one may derive from Δ both A and its negation, and (ii) the deductive closure of Δ with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Lorenzo Peña, Graham Priest's `Dialetheism' -- Is It Althogether True?score: 18.0
    Graham Priest's book In Contradiction (Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff, 1987) is a bold and well argued for defense of the existence of true contradictions. Priest's case for true contradictions -- or «dialetheias», as he calls them -- is by no means the only one in contemporary analytical philosophy, let alone in philosophy tout court . In some sense, other defenses of the existence of true contradictions are less philosophically «heterodox» than his is, since, unlike Priest's orientation, other approaches (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Matti Eklund, Reply to Beall and Priest.score: 18.0
    In my ‘Deep Inconsistency’ (2002a) (henceforth DI), I criticized Graham Priest’s dialetheism by unfavorably comparing it to my preferred view on the liar paradox, a view I will here call the meaning–inconsistency view. Perhaps the main claim in Jc Beall and Priest’s reply (henceforth B&P)1 is that I am guilty of an ignoratio: in DI, I argue that Priest (1987) fails to establish the analyticity of certain principles, but, B&P say, Priest (1987) isn’t concerned to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. John McDowell (2009). Response to Stephen Houlgate. The Owl of Minerva 41 (1-2):27-38.score: 18.0
    I argue that Stephen Houlgate misstates an element in the Kantian background to my reading of “Lordship and Bondage” (§2). He misreads my remarks about the need to see Hegel’s moves there in the context of the progression towards absolute knowing (§3), and, partly consequently, he fails to engage with the motivation for my reading (§4). And he does not understand the way my reading exploits the concept of allegory (§5).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jonardon Ganeri (2010). The Study of Indian Epistemology: Questions of Method—a Reply to Matthew Dasti and Stephen H. Phillips. Philosophy East and West 60 (4):541-550.score: 18.0
    I would like to thank the editors of Philosophy East and West for courteously asking me if I would like to respond to Matthew Dasti and Stephen Phillips' very thoughtful remarks about the review I wrote of Phillips' translation and commentary on the pratyakṣa chapter of Gaṅgeśa's Tattvacintāmaṇi, prepared in collaboration with N. S. Ramanuja Tatacharya (Phillips and Tatacharya 2004). Let me begin by reaffirming what I said at the beginning of my review, that the book is "a monumental (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Stephen Darwall (2009). The Second-Person Standpoint An Interview with Stephen Darwall. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 16 (1):118-138.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Benedikt Paul Göcke (2008). God, Soul, and Time in Priest and Swinburne. New Blackfriars 89 (1024):730-738.score: 18.0
    Contra Swinburne I argue that God cannot exist within time. There is a sufficient condition for its being now now. Because the conception of God existing within time cannot account for this condition, it has to be rejected. Based on Priest I argue that God's creative act is this: to cause the actuality of the universe within the soul.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jc Beall (2012). Why Priest's Reassurance is Not Reassuring. Analysis 72 (3):517-525.score: 18.0
    In the service of paraconsistent (indeed, ‘dialetheic’) theories, Graham Priest has long advanced a non-monotonic logic (viz., MiLP) as our ‘universal logic’ (at least for standard connectives), one that enjoys the familiar logic LP (for ‘logic of paradox’) as its monotonic core (Priest, G. In Contradiction , 2nd edn. Oxford: Oxford University Press. First printed by Martinus Nijhoff in 1987: Chs. 16 and 19). In this article, I show that MiLP faces a dilemma: either it is (plainly) unsuitable (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Sven Rosenkranz (2006). Priest and the Bishop. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (3):335–347.score: 18.0
    According to metaphysical realism, there may be features of reality which we cannot conceive. If this thesis of cognitive closure is inconsistent, then, pace dialetheism, metaphysical realism proves incoherent. Recently, Graham Priest has revived Berkeley's idealist argument meant to show that cognitive closure is inconsistent. If cogent, this argument poses a threat to metaphysical realism. I argue that while Priest's reconstruction of Berkeley's argument may be seen to be paradoxical on one interpretation of ‘conceive’, that interpretation is not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000